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Lowering handles of hawk nuage
#1
any body can tell how much low handle can be done without spoiling it!?
I want to lower it as i cant increase saddle hieght anymore!
I can get the photo of the handle part but would it help?
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#2
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_st-z.html#stem

Well, saddle height depends on your leg length (basically) and your style of pedaling. If you cannot choose a saddle height that is reasonable the frame does not fit (or the seat post is too short).
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#3
(04-08-2010, 02:16 PM)Joe_W Wrote:  http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_st-z.html#stem

Well, saddle height depends on your leg length (basically) and your style of pedaling. If you cannot choose a saddle height that is reasonable the frame does not fit (or the seat post is too short).

I read that article earlier that helps to explain how it works. but doesn't explain how to determine how much low handle can go. my mechanic also don't know how much. I spoilt once by making it dangerously and then got a fresh one so back to square 1 Big Grin
about the seat i cant increase saddle height coz then i struggle to pedal. there is still scope to increase it though.
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#4
OK, saddle height should be correct first (high, but not too high on a road bike, MTBs are a bit different). I'd say that about the last 5-8 cm of the steerer (measured from the top of the fork crown) are butted, I'd probably not insert the stem lower than that. You could just take it out, hold it next to the steerer and guesstimate the maximum insertion depth. Mark that point with a sharpie and try it that is low enough. If you cannot get it low enough, either the stem is too long or the stack of the frame is too high. Replace either stem or frame Wink
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#5
(04-11-2010, 06:54 PM)madcyclist Wrote:  I spoilt once by making it dangerously and then got a fresh one so back to square 1

How did you "spoil" a stem by putting it too low?
I'm not sure what you are trying to do. But if you like having your hands sit way below your seat level, note that there is such a thing as "too low". Except for controlled conditions like a track, having your hands too far below your seat can be a bit dangerous. It shifts your weight forward which can mess up your handling, make flipping over the bars in a hard stop more likely, make it hard to look around, etc. If you feel like the bike is too small and you aren't stretched out enough, maybe try to find a longer stem, not go lower. Maybe if you can explain better what you are trying to achieve, people here can better suggest what to do.
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#6
(04-12-2010, 03:07 PM)DaveM Wrote:  
(04-11-2010, 06:54 PM)madcyclist Wrote:  I spoilt once by making it dangerously and then got a fresh one so back to square 1

How did you "spoil" a stem by putting it too low?
I'm not sure what you are trying to do. But if you like having your hands sit way below your seat level, note that there is such a thing as "too low". Except for controlled conditions like a track, having your hands too far below your seat can be a bit dangerous. It shifts your weight forward which can mess up your handling, make flipping over the bars in a hard stop more likely, make it hard to look around, etc. If you feel like the bike is too small and you aren't stretched out enough, maybe try to find a longer stem, not go lower. Maybe if you can explain better what you are trying to achieve, people here can better suggest what to do.

hi thanks for showing interest to reply! that wud be tough one to answer though. What i am trying is to shift some of my weight to the handles coz on longer rides butts hurt. I have done as i said absolutely everything about seat height. and pedaling is nice i think. still it hurts after 4 hrs ride. if i can shift some of weight to handles might be help?

coming back to spoiling i pushed stem too low and mechanics said it cant be pulled back up anymore Big Grin and also handle got angled to the left a bit about 1 inch which coudn't be straightened with any amount of power. in desperation i took risk again but this time i didn't hit hard and it is still 2-3 inches stem hanging out measured from the top bolt. wont go ahead without expert advice Wink

i don't think bike is too small coz i am 5.9 and its a 24inch bikeframe so its biggest available normally.

Did u say pull the stem out. will i be able to install it again!?

Joe_W quoted: pull stem out and measure it against steerer!
There is one long screw which i have to loosen before lowering and tighten after i am done. can i pull it out completely u mean and measure it. I am not trying to pull out the stem without expert beside me. Sorry i know nothing about mechanics.
I will upload a pic soon.

Thanks very much!
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#7
Well, in order to remove weight from your rear end you have to pedal harder, that way your legs carry more weight, they were made for lifting your body after all. Another point is a good fitting saddle. If the saddle doesn't fit it'll hurt. Concerning the weight transfer: I ride my road bike with a very steep seat angle, I have a seat post that is not set back, and I ride almost exclusively in the drops. After some hours my shoulders and arms get tired, as they were not intended to carry this weight. To ameliorate this I can do two things (well, including changing the position it'd be three): Train my muscles or get aerobars. What you should be aware of is: You can (well, you will) fundamentally and adversely affect the handling of your bike when transferring weight to the front.

What do you mean "handle got angled to the left a bit about 1 inch which coudn't be straightened"? What did you try to do? And also "but this time i didn't hit hard and it is still 2-3 inches stem hanging out"? Don't use excessive force on your bike (unless you know what you're doing)!

On a threaded steerer you loosen the head nut a bit (like when adjusting stem height) and just pull the stem out. You then have the opportunity to clean it (and the inside of the steerer), lightly grease it and reinsert it. Then, move to desired position and tighten the head screw. All done. Only thing that can go worng is on on a quill type stem, the screw will sometimes turn the quill (this is probably only relevant for bikes ~25 yrs and older).
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#8
(04-13-2010, 12:09 PM)Joe_W Wrote:  Well, in order to remove weight from your rear end you have to pedal harder, ....

Thanks!
Ok got you i have to work more on my technique while riding! I tried to work out more with legs but on lower gears I cant put weight on my legs and pedal comfortably. if i want weight more on legs i have to go for high gears but then cadence drops this will tire me out also. but i understand the technique you are talking about.
yeah control is less with more weight on handles. I ride long endless roads which are mostly straight. but yes while take sharp 90 turns i don't feel comfortable. and with those thin tyres its always a risk to go kaboom on the road.

By angling i meant - handle steerer (left grip to right grip) do not cut the line of bike at 90 degree. you must have done the handle rotation to align the handles perpendicular to bike frame. so i messed it up and it couldn't be aligned anymore. hehe.

Thanks again!
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