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#21
Sure Cheryl go for it you will pick up new skills . Not sure about it saving you money though as new parts will cost more than a new bike. You can use rustoleum rust reformer and than paint it with silver paint.That is the crank, bars , and brakes. ETC. Where are you BTW?
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I understand your teaching intent Bill. (I am a former College Prof., among my many hats) I am always for young uns learning how to fix stuff. I spend hours fixing stuff I hate to just throw away. I am probably making .10C an hour. Keeps me out of my wifes hair , and I get peace and quiet in the garage.:-))

I have seen some of your projects here. Nice work.
I have also seen members picking up great bikes such as the Schwinn Super Le Tour in great condition for $50. Now that bike is worth spending time on.

I am looking for one myself, but a nice one rather than have to strip and repaint a rusty one and loose all the original markings, and still have pitted metal on parts.

After being in the school of hard knocks and getting a phd in it I learned to recognize a worth while project and a bury it and walk away project.

I was once offered a rare Vellocete motorcycle. I got all excited and ready to restore it. I was young than. But when I saw the bike sitting under a pigeons roost covered with pigeon droppings and half the metal eaten away I knew better than feel sorry for it.It was beyond restoration. Sad that someone let that happen to that rare motorcycle.

Anyway we are getting away from bicycle repair.
Never Give Up!!!
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#22
(05-19-2010, 01:00 AM)Bill Wrote:  So those are your assignments for tomorrow. Let me know your progress here.
List:
1. Spray down the chain with WD40
2. Check wheels to see if they move freely
3. Check crank to see if it moves freely
4. Check handlebars (steering) to see if it moves back and forth.
5. Squeeze the brake levers and calipers to see if they move freely.
6. Attempt to remove the seat and seat post fro its tube.
7. Spray chain again with WD40.
8. Check back here with progress .

Wheels, handle bars, and crank move fine. The brakes move and stop on the front only the back won't budge. The seat came out after a fight with my dad (we greased it and put it back in). The chain is frozen in many places (we wd-40'ed it 3-4 times) and the shifter cables on one side are rusted. Soooo, yah I have a lot of work to do. as it is now i have to do some research and the bike is in the shed instead of behind it. sorry I got defensive before.

OH! and I live in North Carolina just below Raleigh. I'm going to school in Greenville (ECU). Also I already am looking into painting any exposed rusted metal.
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#23
Glad to hear you and your dad are having fun on this project.Thats worth the price of entry.

Ye the chain looked like a lost cause and IMO should be replaced. You could try soaking it in a rust removing solvent.

Lubricate rusted bolts and nuts with Liquid Wrench, much better than WD40, if you have wd40 try that first.Than remove rusted parts and soak in a good rust cleaning solvent. I think Bill posted on this once. Ask at hardware store.Take photos before you take parts apart so you can see how they go back, take notes.

Disconnect the cable at rear brake to determine if its the brake or the cable thats stuck. Fix as needed. Start cleaning and lubricating all moving parts and cables. Check out Alex's videos on this site.

Eventually servicing all bearings(wheels,crank, steering head) is recommended.

Once you learn how to do all that do some research on vintage bikes, find a worthwhile classic keeper and restore it. Quality vintage bikes had some of the best frames made. Keep it indoors.:-)

North Carolina is gorgeous especially on the coast. Good Wrenching.
Never Give Up!!!
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#24
Hehe George you beat me to it for the next steps lol. Note on the chain, try using a wire brush to knock off some of the rust while dipping the brush into a rust eater solvent. If you have a coffee can or something like that then pour just enough to to dip a wire brush in. Leave it sit over night. Check with your dad about the solvent because he may have something already. Also MAKE sure you WEAR GOGGLES and GLOVES when handling solvents. Definitely do as George said on the Rear Brake. To see if it is the cable or caliper or lever. Do the shifters still move?
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#25
(05-20-2010, 02:53 AM)Bill Wrote:  Hehe George you beat me to it for the next steps lol. Note on the chain, try using a wire brush to knock off some of the rust while dipping the brush into a rust eater solvent. If you have a coffee can or something like that then pour just enough to to dip a wire brush in. Leave it sit over night. Check with your dad about the solvent because he may have something already. Also MAKE sure you WEAR GOGGLES and GLOVES when handling solvents. Definitely do as George said on the Rear Brake. To see if it is the cable or caliper or lever. Do the shifters still move?

didn't try the shifters. i don't think we have any solvent but i'll check. my mom has safety glasses but i know we don't have any rubber gloves (just purple surgical style, will they work?) if i don't have any of this stuff on hand i'll have to wait because i can't buy anything until this weekend. so, right now i'm price checking just in case i'm going to have to replace it all. (cables, housings, and all the bits.)
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#26
Cheryl,
I think you will really struggle to get the chain to work properly.
(And a bad chain will wear the cogs out quickly.)
I would budget for a new chain and some thin oil.
The chain doesn't have to be anything special as any 5/6/7 speed chain will suit.

Gloves - any plastic, rubber gloves should suffice for handling chemicals. The "plastic" ones though tend to be a bit thin and can easily tear. Washing-up gloves are also suitable.
[font=Trebuchet MS]Ride hard or ride home alone![/font]
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#27
ok tried the shifters. they work ok, i'm not entirely happy with them. it looks like the rust on the cables is only surface rust and they might not need replacing.

the rear brake is frozen at the handle, won't budge and i have no clue how to fix that. so any suggestions here are greatly needed.

it looks like my tires have held up pretty well and just naturally lost pressure, so i might luck out here and just have to fill them.

other than all that and the chain, i'm in good shape and this might actually be do-able. again thank you guys so very much for all your help. now if you'll excuse me i'm going to go do a happy dance.
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#28
The rear brake - try squeezing the actual caliper itself. If that moves then suspect the cable. Undo the cable at the caliper end and see if the lever will pull in then.
[font=Trebuchet MS]Ride hard or ride home alone![/font]
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#29
(05-20-2010, 01:31 PM)cyclerUK Wrote:  The rear brake - try squeezing the actual caliper itself. If that moves then suspect the cable. Undo the cable at the caliper end and see if the lever will pull in then.

i undid the cable at the caliper and the handle still didn't move. i squeezed the caliper it's self and that does move. so, i'm looking into replacing the handle and the cables and push comes to shove the housings along with all the other stuff.
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#30
Try removing the cable as it may be that is rusted.
Pull on the outer where it enters the brake lever.
The lever part of the brake is pivoted at the bolt.
Remove the bolt (keep all the bits in a bag or dish) and the lever should come out.
Clean up, reassemble and fit new cable.

If you really want to make a good job then you could take off the bits and paint them. This would take some time though and you might like to do a bit each weekend.

First though I would get everything working.
[font=Trebuchet MS]Ride hard or ride home alone![/font]
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#31
(05-20-2010, 02:41 PM)cyclerUK Wrote:  Try removing the cable as it may be that is rusted.
Pull on the outer where it enters the brake lever.
The lever part of the brake is pivoted at the bolt.
Remove the bolt (keep all the bits in a bag or dish) and the lever should come out.
Clean up, reassemble and fit new cable.

If you really want to make a good job then you could take off the bits and paint them. This would take some time though and you might like to do a bit each weekend.

First though I would get everything working.

i tried to undo the barrel adjuster but it's all wonky and rusted up. (just to see if i could) sprayed it down with wd40, i'll try it again in tomorrow or later tonight and take an adjustable wrench to it if that doesn't work to get it moving. but i'll take it all apart once i get all the parts to put it back together. right now i'm pricing stuff.
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#32
Sorry been away, duty called lol. Anyways I wanted to express something I forgot to mention, tools. You will need a chain breaker tool. I do not know where you plan on shopping but if there is one tool you will want to invest in this is the one. They look like this http://www.walmart.com/ip/Riveting-Tool-for-Shimano/13012554 . That is to remove the chain if you did not already know.

Now use a pair of pliers to screw the barrel end adjuster on the hand lever if that is what you are talking about being wonky. I also wanted to warn you to stay away from these chains as they are cheaper made then the one on the bike currently..... http://www.walmart.com/ip/Bell-Sports-Multi-Speed-Bike-Chain/10400600 . RATHER GO WITH THIS ONE (unless you have one already picked out)....http://www.walmart.com/ip/Ventura-Bicycle-Chain-for-15-21-Speed/13012243 .

NOTE: I used these as you said you were shopping at walmart. Some people can't get on Amazon or Ebay. BUT if you already have a source then by all means go with that. Smile

Bill
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#33
ok so today i took apart my brake lever. the cable is frozen and in trying to get the cable out of the handle (plus trying to squeeze the handle) i managed the screw up my handle. so i'm ordering one lever for each side and brake line kits for both sides (might as well have a matching set).

my repair list:
chain and chain breaker
brake levers and brake cables and housings
WD 40
ferrules and crimps
pump

Buying the chain Bill suggested at walmart and the rest of my list will be ordered from amazon. except for grease, lube, and oil, i haven't gotten around to researching that yet. Smile i will be getting the chain this weekend.
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#34
Very good you are doing AWESOME!!!
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#35
Cheryl,
Out of all the jobs the chain is probably the hardest.
Check out the tutorials on here and also the Park Tools website:-
http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=25

First make a note of the route of the old chain around and through the dérailleur.
To break the old chain can be quite hard and check that the tool "point" lines up with rivet center. If you don't then the rivet wont push out.
When you have the old chain off straighten it out, as best you can, and put the new one alongside it.
This will give you the length required for the new chain (remove the excess) but you can always check against the tutorial video.

Now for ease of fitting and future maintenance I would recommend getting what Park Tool call a "Master Link". There are KMC, Sram or Wipperman versions available. (I prefer KMC.)
Again shown on a tutorial and Park
http://bicycletutor.com/quick-release-chain-link/

If you do then make sure you have the correct one for your width of chain.
[** 8 speed version should be fine.**]

P.S. Hard luck with the brake levers.
If you are fitting complete new ones then you probably have to remove the grips?
[font=Trebuchet MS]Ride hard or ride home alone![/font]
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#36
(05-22-2010, 03:07 PM)cyclerUK Wrote:  Cheryl,
Out of all the jobs the chain is probably the hardest.
Check out the tutorials on here and also the Park Tools website:-
http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=25

First make a note of the route of the old chain around and through the dérailleur.
To break the old chain can be quite hard and check that the tool "point" lines up with rivet center. If you don't then the rivet wont push out.
When you have the old chain off straighten it out, as best you can, and put the new one alongside it.
This will give you the length required for the new chain (remove the excess) but you can always check against the tutorial video.

Now for ease of fitting and future maintenance I would recommend getting what Park Tool call a "Master Link". There are KMC, Sram or Wipperman versions available. (I prefer KMC.)
Again shown on a tutorial and Park
http://bicycletutor.com/quick-release-chain-link/

If you do then make sure you have the correct one for your width of chain.
[** 8 speed version should be fine.**]

P.S. Hard luck with the brake levers.
If you are fitting complete new ones then you probably have to remove the grips?

thanks for the info. yah i'm gonna have to wiggle off the grips.
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#37
(05-22-2010, 11:55 AM)Bill Wrote:  Very good you are doing AWESOME!!!

thank you! it feels really good to be doing something like this. you guys are such a big help.
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#38
On the grips there is a video tutorial if you need help. Those grips are a pain in the neck! Here is the video as it will save you some time..... http://bicycletutor.com/handlebar-grips/ . You are welcome for the help.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#39
If you ever bring your bike to the Raleigh area, you must ride the Greenway. It's a nice long route that takes you all around the city, past the museum, cuts through NC State and Meredith, etc.
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#40
when i started the ordering process for all the parts i needed (chain tool, brake levers, cables, and housing, lubes/grease/oil) it became clear that it wasn't worth it to totally re-haul the bike. i got the bare minium to get it moving (chain and breaker tool, brake cables and housing, and lube/grease/oil), but for transport at school i'm going to break down and buying a new bike. thanks for all the help y'all have given to me in this process. it has been one of learning and adventure and i hope that the skills i have learned from you guys keeps my next bike from getting as bad as my old one.
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