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Opinions re: bolt vs locking disc brakes on mtb's
#1
I'm looking to buy a replacement wheel set for my mtb which has hydraulic disc brakes.

I see there are different types of "disc attachment systems": a "shimano locking hub" style and the six bolted type [I forget the exact number of bolts]

any feelings on the two systems? Is one easier to maintain/install than the other? Does one system require less tools? [I'm a newbie to bike repair]

photos from park tools site

TIA!

Hawaii Mountainbiker

[attachment=961][attachment=962]
When u ride in a peloton of 1 you never get dropped...
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#2
Given that rotors wear and may need replacing I would probably stick with the cheaper and more widely available ISO 6 bolt.

Here are some pros and cons: http://www.feedthehabit.com/mountain-biking/disc-brake-rotors-shimano-centerlock-or-iso-6-bolt/

However, I'm not sure that I agree with the bad points for the 6-bolt system:

Bad 6-bolt

Can install rotors off-center - not by much if all the holes line up.

Removal for shipping is cumbersome - how often do you need to do that?

Risk of stripping a bolt - You can strip any thread on any component if you're ham-fisted enough, if you do this often, invest in a torque wrench and follow the manufacturers guide-lines.

Multiple points of failure (6 bolts) - You could also say that there are 5 back-ups if one bolt fails.
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#3
^ I fully agree with xerxes

Centre-lock hubs are not very common at all, so finding a decent set of wheels becomes much harder. I've also never seen a rotor bolt fail, just what a bit of blue threadlock on them before you install (If it doesn't come with it already) and you'll be fine.

On the subject of new wheels if you're into harsh trails (I'm assuming you are if you've got hydros) I'd see if you can get some Hope hubs (not sure if you can get them in the states). They're a little more expensive but they last forever. They're also cartridge bearing so the hub doesn't wear out.
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#4
(06-02-2010, 10:37 AM)JonB Wrote:  ^ I fully agree with xerxes

Centre-lock hubs are not very common at all, so finding a decent set of wheels becomes much harder. I've also never seen a rotor bolt fail, just what a bit of blue threadlock on them before you install (If it doesn't come with it already) and you'll be fine.

On the subject of new wheels if you're into harsh trails (I'm assuming you are if you've got hydros) I'd see if you can get some Hope hubs (not sure if you can get them in the states). They're a little more expensive but they last forever. They're also cartridge bearing so the hub doesn't wear out.

Thanks to both of you for the reply! I'll go for the traditional set up I'm not into a system that is not widely available.
When u ride in a peloton of 1 you never get dropped...
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