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Bike navigation via your phone
#1
I just read an interesting article about bike navigation applications for both the Android and iPhone platforms. Pretty neat.

http://www.physorg.com/news196013414.html
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#2
Very cool! Wish I could get an one of those type of phones but for now I have my cell, it has an FM radio option lol. Serious thanks for the info.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#3
(06-19-2010, 12:37 PM)Bill Wrote:  . . . it has an FM radio option lol. Serious thanks for the info.

There ya go . . . use the radio station as a homing beacon (AM works better in this app tho) . . . use a coat hanger for the antenna and adjust for direction . . . Just like the old days of aircraft navigation. Smile

On the other side though I am going save this tidbit from the article: "You might think of them as a couple of teenage boys -- well-meaning, enthusiastic and smart, but capable of stunningly bad decisions." Smile

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
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#4
You know Steve, I think you stumbled upon something there. Back in my young years we used to have what they called DX aka "fox" hunts in Amateur Radio. Not sure if they already do this , but there is an idea for them using only bicycles! One would take a transmitter of small power and hide somewhere in their community and a whole bunch would get together with receivers with directional antennas to find it for a prizes. Sorta like the old scavenger/treasure hunts.
But yes thats a cool way to find direction too Smile
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#5
All we need then is to add synchronized pulses in the AM/FM signal so we can send it back to the transceiver, receive it back, then calculate the time it took, giving us our exact distance. Smile

I used to work on those years ago. (TACAN, TVOR, homing beacons and ILS) Smile

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
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#6
(06-22-2010, 11:40 AM)KC-Steve Wrote:  All we need then is to add synchronized pulses in the AM/FM signal so we can send it back to the transceiver, receive it back, then calculate the time it took, giving us our exact distance. Smile

I used to work on those years ago. (TACAN, TVOR, homing beacons and ILS) Smile

Steve

Hehehe ok ya got me beat there, USAF has the REAL good stuff. Big Grin . Was good to see modes named again though.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#7
I find myself opening up the maps app every few miles when I try out a new route. Honestly don't know where I'd be without gps, it's pathetic.
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#8
I have one for my iPhone that tracks where I've gone. The only problem is it only lasts 4-5 hours. How am I supposed to get in a good ride in only 5 hours!? :-P
Live life one century at a time.
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#9
Always get a spare battery, or if there is an option for a Solar Powered charger that you could retrofit into a carrier??
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#10
I spent 7 days this last June doing the AIDS Life Cycle, biking from San Fran to Los Angeles. I saw a couple people with various chargers: None got very good experience with them, not enough to leave their phone on all day.

Phones also tend to use more battery when the signal strength is low. This is akin to yelling. So when you are on the mountain or up in the trees, you will probably see faster battery run down time.

Of the chargers that were in use on the ride, they went in one of 4 positions:
- off the back of the seat - not good, very minimal direct sunlight
- hanging off one's backpack - ok, but sometimes could turn backwards
- mounted on the handlebars - good, but then it's in the way
- mounted on top of one's helmet - best

Of the people I saw, even on a 10 hour ride, they'd only get about 4-5 hours of direct sunlight, and be well below a full charge.

I'd recommend a phone with removable batteries and several charged spares. But you can also get a map holder for < $5.

BTW, I've ridden on Central Expressway, in the article mentioned. It's not bad. It's not great, but it's something doable by most, especially if one is a good rider and defensive. To contrast, try riding on Hwy 101 when fully loaded brussel sprout trucks go by several feet away at 50+ mph.
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