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Shimano, the difference.
#1
Okay this has been bugging me for a while.
Shimano sell all sorts of parts with all sorts of prices and names. What do the names mean. Is there a difference between:

Deore
Ultegra
Tiagra
Acera
Sora

Do different names apply to difference type of bike (i:e sora for MTB, ultegra for road)

Are different names compatible. Can I have an acera shifter with an ultegra chainset. Is it possible to "rank" that list of names from bad - professional quality.

Basically.
What the hell? Smile
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#2
That is a very very good question to asked. The only thing I can really answer to you is the part of using an Acera shifter with the Ultegra chainset which is to read specifications, specifications, specifications! It is best to stay with the same grouping class, but I have heard of cross parts used. Another question you asked is pretty easily answer by going here.. http://bike.shimano.com/ and using the drop down menu under the "Products" tab. It shows MTB, Road, etc. then has the groups that apply to each class of cycling. As far as Best, better, crap lol I really can not tell ya on that one.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#3
Suggest you visit Shimano's EU site here;
http://cycle.shimano-eu.com/
and do some reading, also shop around for prices so you can compare.
These are their UK distributors.
http://www.madison.co.uk/products.aspx?vertical=Cycling
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#4
The low end components (Acera, Sora) work well enough for most. The finish is not great, the parts are heavy and I don't like how Sora shifts and breaks, it feels... squishy, not well controlled.
The extreme highest end stuff is great, but comes with a hefty price tag.
Best bang for bucks is the stuff one or two rungs down the ladder (Road: Ultegra or 105) which is still pretty good but a bit heavier, sometimes lasts longer (steel is oh so sturdy) but is much cheaper (factor of two or three).

I usually have to look up the exact hierarchy of MTB parts since the names changed in last years, well let's say decades (there was Deore LX and DX and there is or was plain LX and XLR and now there is Deore again but at the lower end and... I'm confused)
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#5
AAAAAHHH JOE! you are guilty of crime number one! Quote "Extreme high end stuff is great" WHAT'S THE HIGH END STUFF. obviously I can guess that anything over £200 is high end but that's not a real indicator of quality. You then said "2 rungs down the ladder" but what's this ladder that you are on about and who else is on it?
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#6
Shimano have various styles of gear. MTB, Road, Trekking & Comfort.

If you look on this website :- http://techdocs.shimano.com/techdocs/index.jsp

This will give you all their current types.
[font=Trebuchet MS]Ride hard or ride home alone![/font]
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#7
If you look at the Shimano site: http://cycle.shimano-eu.com/publish/content/global_cycle/en/nl/index.html, they basically list things in descending cost order.

As you go up in the range and in price, the weight generally gets less. The fit and finish of the components is also generally better. However, in terms of performance and durability, it gets more difficult to call.

For example, they might use steel for chainrings and cassette sprockets on some of the low end and mid range products, that will outlast the lighter alloy ones on the higher end products.

In addition, I think the improvements further up the model range, become more subtle. I don't know so much about the road components, but with the MTB stuff, most people stop at XT. There's a massive jump in price to XTR, it's twice the price or more than a similar XT component, but the weight savings and performance gains are very small. Components can wear quite quickly in harsh off road conditions, and falls and crashes that might break things are frequent. The high cost of XTR is fine for riders with sponsorship deals, but too steep for most riders that have to pay out of their own pockets.

For most average riders that don't compete, the mid range stuff is probably perfectly adequate. However, many people might buy something better than they actually need, just because it looks nice. I know my bike is much better than a rider of my low standard actually needs. Smile
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#8
You guys left out the most WIDELY USED derailleur . . . the Tourney!

Now I didn't say popular or best, I said widely used. And I have heard it works well enough to last (a while). When you consider the price, it kinda makes me think what can be so bad about it? Any thoughts?

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Shimano-RD-TX31-Tourney/13012512?sourceid=1500000000000003260420&ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=13012512

If it breaks quickly or is unreliable then shouldn't Shimano either make good on the product or take it off the market all together?

Shimano doesn't seem to be proud of it either. I couldn't find it on their website last time I looked. Maybe I just missed it.

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
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#9
Some of Shimano's budget stuff works really well.

I recently picked up a cheap, used mountain bike to use as a runabout. I has some low cost Shimano shifters and mechs and after cleaning them and replacing the cables, they work really well. The lever actions is light and the changes are quick and positive. In fact I'd say they work at least as well as the Deore and LX set-ups I have on other bikes. Not as light or as pretty though.

Incidentally, the mech is incorrectly mounted in the picture below, I fixed that later. Smile
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#10
(07-20-2010, 12:34 PM)KC-Steve Wrote:  You guys left out the most WIDELY USED derailleur . . . the Tourney!

Now I didn't say popular or best, I said widely used. And I have heard it works well enough to last (a while). When you consider the price, it kinda makes me think what can be so bad about it? Any thoughts?

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Shimano-RD-TX31-Tourney/13012512?sourceid=1500000000000003260420&ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=13012512

If it breaks quickly or is unreliable then shouldn't Shimano either make good on the product or take it off the market all together?

Shimano doesn't seem to be proud of it either. I couldn't find it on their website last time I looked. Maybe I just missed it.

Steve

Shimano show it in their "Tech' Documents".
[font=Trebuchet MS]Ride hard or ride home alone![/font]
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#11
I like to use the Deore parts from shimano they seem to be good and last a long time.The more you pay is not always the best sure it is lite but I am not in a race I ride to have fun and do some touring.Now for my Surly LHT I think I change out most of the parts that came on it so I could make it fit my style of ridding.I would say go with shimano deore for the RD they are easy to set up and last forever.It's your money so if I was you I would do lot's of looking online for the best price and then go to your LBS to see what they can get for you at what price hey they may even match it for you my LBS will on lot's of stuff I want sometimes it's best to go with your LBS even if it cost a little more they are there to help you so let them and if you do your own work and get stuck they will help you more than you think.P.S. I am a Shimano man my self.If I can a part from shimano to work on my bicycle you bet it will have it have it on there too.I need to post a new pic of my Surly LHT so many things I have change on it to many to list.
My dad always told me a Sledge a matic can fix any thing.
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