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New bike woes--Schwinn Clear Creek
#1
I researched a bunch and decided that since Shimano low-end parts were on the $200 Target/Walmart bikes as well as the $400 LBS bikes, it wasn't worth paying the extra $200 for a basic low tech bike for basic flat land needs. Overall the build quality seems good, the frame is steel and solid, the C-Star brakes work well so far for my needs, the wheels and rims seem good for this level of bike and the Tourney RD along with the MRX grip shift, is standard on tons of much more expensive bikes although I know both are still basic. The SR Suntour forks and seat shock are comfortable also. The FD is well, no name or something from the stone age as there are no marks on it and I think may be part of the problem with the noise I hear in the drivetrain. Target put the bike together and I will take it back for 1 try to make an adjustment, but if that doesn't work, it looks like I'll be learning how to do all this stuff myself. Yeah I know a LBS at a much greater expense would most likely have prevented this, but for my very basic paved trail riding I thought it was a good choice. I expect noise but the grinding even in the middle front gear and 2-6 on the back (21-speed) seems like maybe more than an adjustment. I like to ride and not work on bikes and was another reason I wanted a basic bike. Anyone else go this route? Also interested in those with general comments on this situation. Thanks in advance.
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#2
Where is the noise coming from, front or rear deraillieur, hubs, bottom bracket?

Try flipping the bike up and running through the gears to see where the problem is.
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#3
(08-03-2010, 11:32 PM)xerxes Wrote:  Where is the noise coming from, front or rear deraillieur, hubs, bottom bracket?

Try flipping the bike up and running through the gears to see where the problem is.

A small noise from the chain rubbing on the FD side during shifts but the major noise is from the rear hub when I stop pedaling and it freewheels. Its fairly quiet while pedaling but when I stop, the noise increases many times over. I'm wondering #1 if the rear hub is lubed or sealed at the factory and #2 what FD I have as there is no identifying marks on it, and what to do about both.
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#4
If its a constant and steady clicking, that may just be the freewheel. Freewheels are set up like a ratchet. That might be the noise you're hearing.
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#5
(08-04-2010, 02:42 AM)Jordan300 Wrote:  If its a constant and steady clicking, that may just be the freewheel. Freewheels are set up like a ratchet. That might be the noise you're hearing.

Yes, and they are generally a bit noisier when new, as the wear a little they tend to get a bit quieter.

Could try a few drops of oil, make sure it's not running very dry.
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#6
10-4 to all above. Also might be worth while taking the wheel off and making sure its set properly and greased. Have heard stories of poor set up.
To lub freehub lay the wheel on side and let oil penetrate slowly. Its tight but some will get in. I like Teflon lub for this.

See this site for wheel dismantling and adjusting dérailleur info. On top of this page is a link to Alexes great videos. Repair Guide.
Never Give Up!!!
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#7
What a great bunch of guys, thanks for all the quick input, I appreciate it. It does sound like the freewheel may be in need of a little lube. I don't know what came pre-assembled on the bike and what the Target tech should have done so maybe this may be the fix. I'll look at the video's also. Is there just one or two general purpose lubes I can get that will work on everything or do I need several? All I see at the local store is chain lube but I can mail order something or go to a bike store and get it there, would like to keep it as simple as possible if thats an reasonable option w/o sacrificing what the bike really needs. Thanks again everyone.
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#8
First of all where are you??? We are international and locals can tell you best.

In USA..........
As far as Lubs, You can start with Teflon spray for most moving parts , Chain lub and cleaner, grease for bearings, I use Bel-Rey Marine grease, although the new Teflon grease at bike stores is good, and Liquid Wrench to spray on stubborn nuts before disassembly.

BTW the Teflon grease is a lot cheaper and in bigger tubes at swimming pool supply places. Looks the same to me. Is there a chemist in the house??

Again check the videos there are some products recommended. Start a specialty tool collection starting with cone wrenches for wheels.Your BB is likely sealed .
Never Give Up!!!
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#9
I do hear the freewheel "ratcheting" sound, but also there is a mechanical/vibration sound. Not grinding. Maybe its just the low tech parts they use that make more noise in a thin hub? The tire spins and spins and spins after hand turning so whatever it is, its not creating much/if any friction The Schwinn owners manual say to use "oil" for the freewheel but doesn't list anything more than to do it every 6 months. I would think a bad hub would make the noise all the time if it was underlubricated or defective, not just freewheeling? I watched the lubrication videos and still wondering what lube would be best as I don't plan to take the hub apart and lube, just put a few drops of oil somewhere as the owners manual didn't say where and by looking at it, I didn't see an obvious place to oul.
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#10
I wouldn't put oil in the hubs themselves, it's too thin and you should really use grease. If you take the wheels off, you may be able to pop the bearing seals or dust caps off without disassembling the hubs and push some fresh grease into the bearings with your finger, or using a small grease gun if you have one. However, with many hubs, there isn't much of a gap and it would be tricky to get the grease in amongst the ball bearings where it's actually needed.

Here's some more info on hubs: http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=105
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#11
(08-05-2010, 02:55 PM)xerxes Wrote:  I wouldn't put oil in the hubs themselves, it's too thin and you should really use grease. If you take the wheels off, you may be able to pop the bearing seals or dust caps off without disassembling the hubs and push some fresh grease into the bearings with your finger, or using a small grease gun if you have one. However, with many hubs, there isn't much of a gap and it would be tricky to get the grease in amongst the ball bearings where it's actually needed.

Here's some more info on hubs: http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=105

Thanks for the link. This is starting to get way too complicated for a guy who just wanted a simple bike to ride. Maybe a simple quality $200 bike doesn't exist and working on them is not a joy for me. I think I'm better off just returning the bike and finding another hobby, thanks for all the excellent responses.
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#12
Don't give up, I'm sure it's just a bit of teething trouble. Do you know anyone that has a little knowledge that could give your bike a quick once over and put your mind at rest.

Like cars, bikes do need regular maintenance to perform at their best, and things do wear out and need replacing, but in general you'll get hundreds of miles of riding for every hour or two you have spend tinkering.
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#13
Yeah, my disappointment comes from working enough on technical issues with car's and aircraft that I didn't need those issues with a bike I bought for enjoyment. I called Schwinn and explained the issue and asked if this was what I could expect owning one of their bikes and that I had the option to still get a refund. The rep was very helpful and sounded like they knew bikes and came to the same conclusion that the problem was in the rear hub. They also thought it might possibly be a bad fit with the rim or spokes and are sending me a whole new rim/hub assembly. For a now mass market company, it was the best customer service I had seen in years. Let's hope this actually fix's the problem and I can start riding. After the 1 year warranty is up, when something goes bad I certainly plan to upgrade a level or two as bike parts for the low-mid range are quite reasonable in cost and will then have better components than the $400 bikes I was looking at. At least that's the plan. For now, I just want to ride.
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#14
Good for you and Schwinn. Maintaining bikes aint that bad. I got a motorcycle too. Keeps me in the garage away from honey do this stuff. :-))

I got my Schwinn almost 20 years ago and just recently I started to go through it renewing some parts. (Aside from some lubing and minor adjustments.) Thats pretty good.

When I see some of the Dept Store bikes I am amazed that they can ship them from China and sell them so cheap and still make a profit. The parts alone are worth a lot more, as one lister found out when she wanted to restore a wreck.

I also cant believe the $4000 bikes, wow.

Dodo happens.
Never Give Up!!!
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#15
Hi all I'm a newb here, I'm rick I saw the name Clear Creek I own a Schwinn Clear Creek that Ive had for 16 years it was the 1995 100th anniversary edition. It's all cro molly very very light I paid 350 dollars for it in 1995 basically kept it up never dumped it.One day I took in a set of rims to have some street tires put on them & have the local pro go over them. I use to do it all myself . I just don't have the time anymore. When i told the guy what bike they were going on he asked to see the bike so I brought it in. When I went back to pick up my rims the guy that worked on them was in awe of the bike he offered me $425 dollars for it which I declined . He said it was a very, very, rare bike 7 I had no idea I didn't realize they were still making the Clear Creek







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#16
(08-04-2011, 12:12 AM)jumpa Wrote:  Hi all I'm a newb here, I'm rick I saw the name Clear Creek I own a Schwinn Clear Creek that Ive had for 16 years it was the 1995 100th anniversary edition. It's all cro molly very very light ....... I didn't realize they were still making the Clear Creek
The new model with the same name is nothing like the bike you have - your '95 is a far better machine.
(08-07-2010, 02:33 AM)flyted Wrote:  ...... in cost and will then have better components .......

you seem to be overly fixated on the components - which are NOT that important. The important thing is the design and build quality of the frame, and the build quality of the wheels - not the components. I can put together a great set of wheels from low end rims and hubs (but decent spokes); just as easily, a great set up rims and hubs does not mean a quality wheel.
Nigel
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#17
(08-04-2011, 08:54 AM)nfmisso Wrote:  
(08-04-2011, 12:12 AM)jumpa Wrote:  The new model with the same name is nothing like the bike you have - your '95 is a far better machine.
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[quote='flyted' pid='9916' dateline='1281148395']
...... in cost and will then have better components .......

you seem to be overly fixated on the components - which are NOT that important. The important thing is the design and build quality of the frame, and the build quality of the wheels - not the components. I can put together a great set of wheels from low end rims and hubs (but decent spokes); just as easily, a great set up rims and hubs does not mean a quality wheel.

I bought the lights last month because someone clipped me with their mirror on Cranberry Hwy one fine June "Dark" morning. Yet I'm not sure if thats what you mean by components. The lights and the speedo meter are the only components Ive purchased in the 16 years. Oh yea and the drink holder, all other components came with it. I did pick up the set of rims "pictured on it now" at a yard sale. They were on a spring riddled mongoose I paid $40 bucks for. I thought I was getting an awesome deal for $40 bucks until I picked up the Goose. It felt like the frame was filled with lead "What happened to Mongoose I wondered . Then I found out they were sold to Walmart I wish I kept my Supergoose & I surly would have if it wasnt stolen #@$%^$

See when I was a kid or teenager Mongoose was where it was at,along with Redline , P.K. Rippers , Super Goose. all cost upwards of $400-$1200 dollars each. Back then in 1983$300 was like $700 is today. So the Mongoose rims are now "my beater rims" I keep the stock rims for long distance road trips and such. . I dont consider myself a hard core serious biker However I have managed to ride at least once every year of my life since I learned to ride. Thank you "nfmisso" for the very kind words towards my bike, P.S. Have you ever seen or ridden a 1995 CC?
Sincerely
Rick
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#18
oops wrong post
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