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PROJECT: Pneumatic piping
#21
The flexible pipe connecting the compressor to the black steel pipe, rated at least 150-psi, is very difficult to find and much more expensive. I first went to Grainger Supply but the counter guys had little knowledge about what I needed. So I went to an air compressor wholesale supply and found two 18-inch pieces to replace the gas range flexible pipe. A coupler connector is between the two pieces.

The new pipe is 3/4-inch and is all that was available without spending a great deal more time searching for something smaller. The length has to be at least 32 inches in my situation so if you can reduce the length by placing the compressor closer to your pipe then you might save some money.

Steve
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#22
This section has two male ends so new connectors are required to fit it into the air supply system. Shown below are a reducer (for both ends, 3/4" to 1/2") and another union to insert the new section to the piping.

A small nipple is also required. Make sure you use plumber's tape for all threads to avoid air leaks.
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#23
(08-17-2010, 03:45 PM)Ramzious Wrote:  Might want to check the pressure rating on those shut off's too. The steel pipe is fine as it is just air, we use galvanized pipe in FL simply for the rust prevention is more important on the outside of the pipe (LP gas carries no Oxygen- therefore no rust on inside of pipes).

The shut-off valves are fine. They use a ball valve. I decided not to use galvanized pipe because small pieces of it come loose and will clog the filter at the end of the run. Filter clogs will cause undesirable pressure variations. There will be water in the system because the whole point is to cool the air so moisture condenses inside the pipe, to be removed via the drains and the moisture filter at the end of the piping system.

Therefore, at some time in the future some or all of the pipe will need to be replaced. That's where the unions will be an important feature.

Steve
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#24
Connecting the air compressor to the pipe, I made sure that the slope allowed water to flow back into the compressor tank to be drained from the tank. I didn't want a low spot where water would accumulate or puddle up.

Also make sure you don't kink the flexible pipe. That would weaken the pipe and possibly reduce air flow.

There is somewhat of an added benefit to using the 3/4-inch flexible pipe. When air in a 1/2-inch pipe out of the compressor hits the 3/4-inch wide pipe then there is a tendency for water in the air to condense, just like when you use an air blower, water droplets form on the tip of the blow gun.
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#25
Now back to the end of the air supply system and moisture filter. As stated previously, layout components on the floor and visualize how they will go together. There is a union for ease of assembly and dis-assembly. This also helps to have the proper measurements. Then assemble the components.

This section has a drain to remove accumulated water. There will also be the quick disconnect for an air hose, not shown below.
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#26
Connect the filter assembly to the piping system and attach to the platform on the wall.
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#27
Wow Steve I really wish I had time to do this for my Compressor. Work has been keeping me sooo busy. Sad
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#28
In the photos below, I installed the pressure gauge on the pressure regulator. I also added new fittings for the quick-disconnect receptacle for the air hose connection.

Here in the post-filter section you must be VERY careful about wrapping your plumber's tape so that pieces of it won't come loose inside the pipe. There isn't a filter to prevent loose tape from getting into your air supply unless you use another filter at the tool.
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#29
After checking everything, making sure everything is tight, and closing all the shut-off valves, . . . NOW IT'S TIME TO TEST THE SYSTEM! Yee-haw. Fun time!

I ran the compressor up to a modest 50-psi just to see if it leaks.

The first photo shows the compressor's pressure gauge at around 50-psi. The second photo shows the filter/regulator's pressure gauge reading around 40-psi. This is roughly a 10-psi drop (or 20-percent drop) in the readings across the piping system and I don't think that is unusual.

It doesn't leak too bad. Compressors always leak a little. I estimate that it leaks around 3 to 5 psi every hour or so. The compressor can easily manage that amount of leakage. If leakage is ever a problem, just use soapy water on the joints and connections to see where the leak exists.

Of course, in normal operating conditions, the air compressor will be set to 90-psi with the regulators set to 50-psi when painting with an HVLP paint gun. So there won't be any variations in air pressure at the gun.

The REAL TEST comes when I lay down a coat of paint though, but that's another thread though. Smile

BTW, don't forget to tie everything down after testing.

Steve
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#30
(08-25-2010, 12:54 PM)Bill Wrote:  Wow Steve I really wish I had time to do this for my Compressor. Work has been keeping me sooo busy. Sad

Thanks Bill. It was a fun project though. I learned a lot and thanks again to Ramzious. I'm sure you'll get around to it someday. Smile

Steve
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#31
(08-25-2010, 01:39 PM)KC-Steve Wrote:  
(08-25-2010, 12:54 PM)Bill Wrote:  Wow Steve I really wish I had time to do this for my Compressor. Work has been keeping me sooo busy. Sad

Thanks Bill. It was a fun project though. I learned a lot and thanks again to Ramzious. I'm sure you'll get around to it someday. Smile

Steve

You are welcome. Would rather you find out before it blows up than after. Right tools (or parts) for the right job is always a good thing.
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