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First Mountain Bike - Which Gary Fisher
#1
Hey guys, I am brand new to the forums and to biking. I biked a bit as a kid, but never stuck with the sport or ever had my own bike. A few weeks ago I got on a bike again and picked it back up quickly, riding around some of the flat empty roads in my town. I now feel comfortable with speed, shifting gears, turning and going up and down hill and remaining control. I am an avid snowboarder, so balance and endurance doesn't seem to be an issue for what I will be doing. I plan to take my bike around town, on some of the paved and gravel roads, and on some pretty clean and easy mountain trails. My friend, who planned on using his bike in similar circumstances to me, purchased a carbon fiber road bike, and has had trouble using it on trails, in town and on gravel, but loves his bike for the road. After learning a bit about bikes and talking to my friend, it seems a mountain bike will be the best bet.

The local bike shop has many expensive mountain bikes, with the cheapest being the 2010 Gary Fisher Marlin and Wahoo. I will be going there tomorrow to try these bikes. Are these good bikes for what I plan to ride? Should I be looking at something different? Recommendations are welcome. Thanks.
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#2
This is generally a good time of the year to buy late model bicycles, as the stores should be making room for the 2011 models due in later this year. If you visit a few stores, you'll find other brands and can compare.

The bike would probably fit your plans very well. I've found that the nubby tires on my mountain bike aren't the best on paved roads as compared to my road bike. But it's OK for a quick trip to the store or similar.

One thing about riding it around town - it will be a more expensive around-town bike, so be sure you get a U lock and probably a chain of sufficient strength to protect it from getting lifted. Either of those Fisher bikes will stand out from Target and WalMart beaters that may be next to it in the bike racks.
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#3
Alright, thanks for the reply. How does the mountain bike compare to road bikes on dirt or not perfectly smooth roads? I really want this bike to be a durable all around bike, that I can use to work on sharp turns and switching gears, and also something I can use to ride around to work out and have fun. I am sure the Gary Fishers would serve that purpose, but would a hybrid bike work well too? My store has many Trek hybrids in the 500 dollar price range. Thanks again.
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#4
I have a road bike and a mountain bike. Nothing better for road riding than a good road bike. A good hybrid might compare, but still not the same thing.

But I must agree with you that on gravel and anything dicey, it is definitely not the best option.

I guess hybrid might be your best choice in your situation. But don't do anything real technical in the trail riding area.

You might consider spending your bigger bucks on the one you think you will use the most, either road or mountain. And then search for a good used one online or locally for the other.
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#5
(08-21-2010, 08:19 AM)broyo13 Wrote:  Alright, thanks for the reply. How does the mountain bike compare to road bikes on dirt or not perfectly smooth roads? I really want this bike to be a durable all around bike, that I can use to work on sharp turns and switching gears, and also something I can use to ride around to work out and have fun. I am sure the Gary Fishers would serve that purpose, but would a hybrid bike work well too? My store has many Trek hybrids in the 500 dollar price range. Thanks again.

A hybrid bike would work, as long as you don't go jumping over logs, boulders, and jumps. A flat trail with hills shouldn't be a problem.

If you don't mind getting a little grime on you, you could also swap tires between smoother road tires and knobby off-road tires on the same bike frame.

The price range on new hybrid bikes should be about $350-$600. Trek bikes are nice, but they usually are in the higher end of the price range.
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#6
I'd grab up that Marin. Gary fisher won't be putting his name on the bikes that way any longer. It's all Trek now. Of course you'll still see the little Gary fisher signature. but it's not the same. Grab that Marin!

It may be a little sluggish on the road, especially when riding with someone on a road bike. But you'll really enjoy the Marin I think.
Always buy more bike than you want. I know it's tough to justify it. But 9 times out of ten once you buy it you'll have wished you got then one that was a little better.
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