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Holdsworth Equippe
#1
Holdsworth Equippe

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My new winter commuter had a thing for steel bikes since my last 4130 chromoly Giant Commuter. Picked this 531 Plain Gauge 1970 Holdsworth, not one of their High End frames but still very nice with really relaxed angles can be ridden for miles in comfort. Resisting the temptation to turn into a fixi for the moment.

The original Campagnolo mech has long gone replaced with a low end Shimano. It shifts well enough, its really nice to shift without indexing for a change, like going from a Auto to manual Car, The Huret front Mech looks like it should not work but is really effective. 10 Speed with 14-26 on the rear Changed out the 50, 40 Chainset for a cheap 50, 34 Compact and a Square Taper UN53. This would make a really nice light touring bike with a triple on the front. Nice set of 27’ Wobler Superchamp rims , Tyres a bit limited at this size but Schwalbe Marathon are available at 1’1/4

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#2
Nice bike--I've always liked orange frames and this bike looks like it might have been inspired by the Gulf-sponsored racing cars of its era.
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#3
Looks nice. I like your pedals too. I used to have a set of those.
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#4
a nice bike in the day, look here for more info;
http://www.nkilgariff.com/
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#5
Ahhh love old bike! Nice!
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#6
I really appreciate the above link to the site with the origins and successes of the Holdsworth/Grugg/Butler marques. Thanks for posting it. Seems Mr. Grubb was quite the racer as his records of a century ago would be the envy of most riders today. Amazing. And sad that his efforts in the '30s to make modern tubular furniture was a costly failure. Still, one has to applaud these enthusiasts and entrepreneurs for standing on the pedals and living large throughout their lives.
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#7
It would have been nice if these quality frame makers could have looked up some time in the early eighties and followed the trend into Mountain Bikes. They might have been with us still to see things come full circle. Its funny I have had my share of Hybrids and Converted Mountain bikes for commuting when all I needed was a 10 speed racer, it also pleases my recycling ethos that I can replace a few choice components on a 40 year old frame rather than waste resources and heaps of cash on a shiny new bike.
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#8
Ahhh, I remember 1970 well. Very kewl bike! Colors on nearly everything were bright and loud. It was common on everything including cars. If you check out the latest retro Dodge Challenger you will see a similar color. Below is a photo of the 1970 version. (not mine)

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
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#9
(09-08-2010, 12:05 AM)KC-Steve Wrote:  Ahhh, I remember 1970 well. Very kewl bike! Colors on nearly everything were bright and loud. It was common on everything including cars. If you check out the latest retro Dodge Challenger you will see a similar color. Below is a photo of the 1970 version. (not mine)

Steve

This was the Holdsworth Team Colours of the 70s they replicated them on their lower end bikes like the equippe as a marketing exercise. Love the Dodge, our cars were not quite so extravagant here in the UK, but my Dad did own a bright orange Hillman Avenger (Plymouth Cricket) in the 70s and my weapon of choice was an orange Raleigh Chopper. Not sure weather to change the handlebar tape to brown leather effect to match the brown charge spoon saddle.
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