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Handlebar Riser
#1
As a mechanical engineer, I will always design and then make what I need if I can before buying it. I needed to raise my handlebars about 4.5 inches to lessen the pressure on my hands and to sit up a little more. I have a new Genesis V2100 from Kent with a threadless headset. I searched on the web for a riser and never found one so I designed one and made it in the shop. It worked flawlessly and I feel better riding. I did however find today at a bike shop a riser similar to mine but only half the height. I will attach some pictures of it.

I Hope you all enjoy the pics. I am working to manufacture this at an affordable $25 - $35 each depending on height. Do you think this is a sellable item.

I am 6'2" with a 34 inseam. I really needed this riser.
Stuck at minus 19 pounds - Getting Discouraged
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#2
WASSUP! Mr. Jones

I am 6'6" with a 37 inseam and I think your idea is AWESOME!! I AM SO HAPPY! to FINALLY see inventive ideas catering to the TALL men living in this "small & short" world!

Nobody thinks tall... Even when I saw your picture I thought "this is an interesting little bike".. After looking at the rest of the page I was SO HAPPY!!! Just the other day (Sunday) another tall person was asking me about how to solve the same problem and knew if there was a part like the one you made.
Good work VERY CLEAN looking!

I am not a marketing expert... It's ideas like this is what will make it a better world!!

Thanks for sharing!
QWILDER
[size=x-large]MORE BIKES!![/size] [size=medium]LESS CARS!![/size]
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#3
well done m8 .... very impressed with the quality of the finish .. really nice work
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Boardman Team Road/Race Bike

Felt 620 MTB
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#4
A very good idea, except one that others have had already. Search for "threadless riser". On your design, are you using set screws to secure it to the steerer tube? If so, I'd be a little worried about the strength of that connection and the chance it could damage the steerer. Most designs I see use a pinch bolt design like the stem. But still, well done for home made!
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#5
Nice work. They are available , could not find height info.

In the movie biz we use a lot of set screw fittings for building trusses, camera rigs etc They hold very well. Pinch system works well to.

http://www.rei.com/product/700227
Never Give Up!!!
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#6
while waiting on parts to arive to fix 2 of my bikes, i made something similar for a 20" so i could still ride. pretty much it was a riser, threaded to threadless adapter, and an eyesore all in one.Smile it was press- fit (ok, sledgehammered)into the fork, another pipe over it connected to a threadless stem. even had a shim made from a mtn dew can. considered using set screws for added security ( yeah, its a little loose),but havent done it yet. i dont recommend my "design" to anyone, nor will i let my kids ride it. but i believe you did it the right way, i would trust yours. if you had to make it "better", could you drill & tap the set screws through both pieces?
Get on your bad pedalscooter and ride!
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#7
(09-21-2010, 08:13 PM)DaveM Wrote:  A very good idea, except one that others have had already. Search for "threadless riser". On your design, are you using set screws to secure it to the steerer tube? If so, I'd be a little worried about the strength of that connection and the chance it could damage the steerer. Most designs I see use a pinch bolt design like the stem. But still, well done for home made!

You are absolutely correct. It will dimple the steering tube. I have the next generation already designed. The issue with a split clamp is that it makes the manufacturing of it more expensive due to the complexity of machining setups. However I have figured out how to machine it still using a CNC lathe which will cut costs.

Thanks to all.
(09-22-2010, 12:38 AM)GeorgeET Wrote:  Nice work. They are available , could not find height info.

In the movie biz we use a lot of set screw fittings for building trusses, camera rigs etc They hold very well. Pinch system works well to.

http://www.rei.com/product/700227

The most height I had found is 2.5 inches. I rode tonight and still think I need a few maybe 2 more inches
(09-21-2010, 08:10 PM)jinxy72 Wrote:  well done m8 .... very impressed with the quality of the finish .. really nice work

Thanks for the compliment but it goes to my machinist tech Jerry Taxon. Very maticulous at his craft.
(09-21-2010, 02:06 PM)qwilder Wrote:  WASSUP! Mr. Jones

I am 6'6" with a 37 inseam and I think your idea is AWESOME!! I AM SO HAPPY! to FINALLY see inventive ideas catering to the TALL men living in this "small & short" world!

Nobody thinks tall... Even when I saw your picture I thought "this is an interesting little bike".. After looking at the rest of the page I was SO HAPPY!!! Just the other day (Sunday) another tall person was asking me about how to solve the same problem and knew if there was a part like the one you made.
Good work VERY CLEAN looking!

I am not a marketing expert... It's ideas like this is what will make it a better world!!

Thanks for sharing!
QWILDER

You made my day. Thanks
Stuck at minus 19 pounds - Getting Discouraged
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#8
Many people are surprised at the lack of height adjustment on threadless stems and find riding them for general use bad for the back and wrists.
Srem risers have been available for some time, both for quill and threadless stems, here is one you can get in the UK;
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#9
Quote:The most height I had found is 2.5 inches. I rode tonight and still think I need a few maybe 2 more inches

You need a bigger frame. Smile

If you think of the amount of leverage on the handlebars and stem, they are both highly stressed areas and I would worry about the strength of long stem extensions. Looking at your frame it seems quite small, no larger than mine and I'm only 5'8. A larger frame would be a lot stronger and safer solution and would probably fit better all round.
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#10
Right on xerxes. If you need such great height increases the bike is too small. OR you need to adjust your riding position. It looks like a BMX.

IMO, That cruiser seat is the next thing to go. Everyone starts with a big plushy seat (me too) ,When I finally got a proper Terry liberator Y for my MB I discovered what fit is.
Never Give Up!!!
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#11
(09-22-2010, 05:05 PM)GeorgeET Wrote:  Right on xerxes. If you need such great height increases the bike is too small. OR you need to adjust your riding position. It looks like a BMX.

IMO, That cruiser seat is the next thing to go. Everyone starts with a big plushy seat (me too) ,When I finally got a proper Terry liberator Y for my MB I discovered what fit is.

That cruiser seat is the only thing between me at 340 pounds and a whole lot of butt ache. I have found this to be the most comfortable for now at 5 miles per day until I get better at riding or more experienced. I just purchased the dual pad seat with no nose. It shipped today and I will try that one as well. I do not mountain bike. I road ride but needed the larger tires for my size.
Stuck at minus 19 pounds - Getting Discouraged
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#12
Yikes thats almost 2 + of me. :-))) Looked Lakeland up its smack in the middle of Florida, H&H. I lived in Coconut Grove Fl.

Did not know they still made the noseless seats. Lets hear how you like it.
Never Give Up!!!
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#13
(09-22-2010, 08:52 AM)xerxes Wrote:  
Quote:The most height I had found is 2.5 inches. I rode tonight and still think I need a few maybe 2 more inches

You need a bigger frame. Smile

If you think of the amount of leverage on the handlebars and stem, they are both highly stressed areas and I would worry about the strength of long stem extensions. Looking at your frame it seems quite small, no larger than mine and I'm only 5'8. A larger frame would be a lot stronger and safer solution and would probably fit better all round.

I measured my frame and it is a 19 inch. Much smaller than I should have I guess. This is my first mountain bike.
I am working on my legs to strengthen them and the smaller frame is helping.

I am purchasing a 23" Cannondale R1000 from a colleague in 2 months. It is a road bike. He purchased a Cannondale Slice 5.
Stuck at minus 19 pounds - Getting Discouraged
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#14
Try this: http://www.ebicycles.com/bicycle-tools/frame-sizer

Also, measure your inseam correctly, rather than go by what length trousers you wear: http://www.ehow.com/how_14104_determine-correct-frame.html
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#15
Great design!

I'm 6'-2" and my frame is 64 cm vertical. If I could raise the handlebar height an additional 5" - 6", I would be in hog heaven. When you begin production please contact me.

Regards,

Bruce

I Hope you all enjoy the pics. I am working to manufacture this at an affordable $25 - $35 each depending on height. Do you think this is a sellable item.

I am 6'2" with a 34 inseam. I really needed this riser.
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#16
You definitely need a much LARGER bike frame. From your dimensions, you need a 25" or 26" frame on the road; I am 5'10", wear trousers with a 30" inseam, am 300+lbs and ride bikes with 23" frame with the saddle 30" from the crank center line. That saddle look pain full to me.

Check out some of my bikes:
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-3167.html
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-2920.html
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-3036.html
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-3216.html

That much extension is not safe - and I would definitely not entertain selling it in the over lawyered country. I am also a Mechanical Design Engineer; feel free to chack me out on LinkedIn.
Nigel
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