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Bearing size?
#1
how common are the 3/16 inch bearings on the front?
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#2
I'm not sure, what make and model hubs do you have and is there any information on their website? I know you can find all the technical documents and service manuals on Shimano's and SRAM's sites.
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#3
Before the advent of MTB's, this was the standard and is still used if the axle size is 5/16", if the axle is 3/8" or 10mm, (or sometimes 9mm. on the front) they are probably 1/4", although some bmx's use 7/32".
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#4
I don't know if it helps but it is from like 2000ish and a cheap mountan bike
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#5
(10-22-2010, 07:10 PM)nd456 Wrote:  I don't know if it helps but it is from like 2000ish and a cheap mountan bike

Very likely 10x 3/16" per side, 20 balls in the front wheel.

Rear wheel is likely 9x 1/4" per side, 18 ball in the rear wheel.
Nigel
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#6
Well I took it apart and found that it had bearings in a cage instead of being loose
Weird
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#7
Ye I see you said cheap Mt Bike. I think that to reduce assembly costs caged bearings were used. I found that on one of my recently acquired bikes. I replaced the caged bearings with loose bearings providing a larger rolling surface and less friction.

Bike stores have a bearing gauge, find the appropriate size and replace with loose bearings. Use lots of grease to hold bearings in place while you reassemble.
Never Give Up!!!
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#8
(10-27-2010, 02:17 AM)GeorgeET Wrote:  . . . Bike stores have a bearing gauge, find the appropriate size and replace with loose bearings. Use lots of grease to hold bearings in place while you reassemble.

Hardware store too! Last time I went to a bike shop for bearings, they didn't have the size I needed and said, ". . . just go next door to the hardware. That's where we get ours."

Turns out the hardware store was cheaper too. Smile

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
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#9
Now thats interesting I'll have to check. I get lots of nuts, bolts and o-rings in the hardware store.

Bikes use so many different threads I tried to get axle nuts and could not find the right thread.Than I went to bikerowave a do it yourself shop with boxes of old parts. Could not find right axle nuts in a whole box of them. WOW.

Also seal and bearing stores are becoming rare, I could not find one locally.Ye if it breaks throw it away. shees...
Never Give Up!!!
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#10
thanks guys i got it back together and it works great i left the cage because it's my crap bike
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#11
Cage bearings are crap and will pit out your races. whenever you find these, instantly get rid of. Bearing stores are way more dependable than a bike shop. But like you say, if there even found. Bike shops carry only certain bearing, loose, sealed, sizes. Good luck. Luck of the draw. Theres a great tool called a thread gauge. Takes the guessing game out of trying to figure out what thread your dealing with. Some hardware stores carry them. SOME hardware stores.
GO RIDE...
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