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Best winter bike protection ideas
#1
I've started commuting through the winter, and I'm looking for what others do to keep their bike protected from the elements. I've installed fenders, which are a *big* help. But in my city, the city spreads a lot of salt on the roads, and that's what I worry about the most.

When I worked in a factory about 30 years ago, we often keep new metal stock outdoors, and we would spray it with a product called LPS-3. The manufacturer makes 3 products (1, 2, & 3), and with different lubricating properties and viscosities. LPS-3 is the thickest and after the solvent dries from the spray can, all that is left is a waxy film which seems to protect metal from rust for many months. I also used to use it for bike chain lubrication. Now I'm thinking about spraying the entire bike down with this product, except for things like tires, saddle, brake shoes, etc.

So I'm just looking for what others have used that have proven effective in protecting the bike from the harshest winter forces, especially raod salt.
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#2
I would recommend getting fenders
The quieter you become the more you are able to hear
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#3
Yes, as I said, I've already done that. Smile
Thank you.
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#4
Yes, as I said, I've already done that.

Did you coat the undersides of the fenders with LPS3?
I'm sorry to report that you have a daily maintenance schedule in your future. Salt on Any material is much harsher than Mud. Mountain-bikers detest mud stuck to Anything on the bike.
Wheelies don't pop themselves. (from a QBP fortune cookie)
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#5
RobAR, the fenders are polycarbonate with stainless steel hardware, so I'm not sure if the LPS product would help any.

I've been doing daily cleaning (okay, sometimes every other day), but I'm just looking for any specific info that others might have to share. Things like, "How do people do the initial cleaning (of snow, salt, mud, etc.) before you get down to any final cleaning, lubing, etc.)?" I'm thinking of setting up an area in the basement, near the floor drain, where I can have a hose coming from the sink and lightly run fresh water over the bike (keeping clear of the bearings, of course). That's if my wife allows me to invade her laundry area. Wink
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#6
A daily rinse will help keep grime away. Maybe use a spray degreaser every once in a while on derailleurs and such. Environmentally safe of course. Lubing the chain every few rides will be necessary depending on the distance of your commute. I would recommend a pair of rain pants, cause your thighs will get soaked if raining or snowing. Becomes very uncomfortable when pedaling. Windproof gloves or liners will be key as well.
GO RIDE...
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#7
Thanks for the suggestions, JohnnyCO. I was thinking of using a biodegradable product called Simple Green. Have you or anyone else used this for cleaning bikes?

I have a pair of Goretex pants that I bought years ago, but I've only found a need for them when it's VERY cold, layered over my regular long tights, or when it's cold and raining. But it's good to know that they are there when that kind of weather does occur. Most of the light rains and snows though, I find it best just to keep to the long tights alone, as they have wind-breaking fronts and breathable, lighter back material.
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#8
My buddy sprays his 4-wheeler plastic with armor-all before he goes out in the woods, when he gets home, a hose takes nearly all the mud off. this may work on your fenders as well.
Get on your bad pedalscooter and ride!
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