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Looking for a decent mini bike pump...
#1
Hi guys,

I'm new to the forums here, but I've been enjoying the tutorials on this site for some time.

I want to buy a new mini pump for my mountain bike, but I'm not really sure which ones are good. I don't need a top of the range model, I just want something that's straightforward to use, and is not going to break after a week. Being a mountain bike, my tyres have a Schraeder connection, and I think they're rated between 45-60 psi (although I know tyre pressures are a contentious issue), so it wouldn't have to be something that delivers super-high pressure.

I've been having a look at a couple of mini pumps - has anyone used or bought one of these, and are they any good?

- Zefal Air Profil Micro
- Beto 2-stage mini pump with gauge
- Quicker Micro

The Beto has a gauge, but looks like it'd be difficult to see while you're pumping. The Quicker Micro looks like you have to hold it on (rather than having a thumb lock).

Anyone have any other suggestions for a reliable middle-of-the-range mini pump that might suit?

Cheers (and thanks for reading),

Rofey
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#2
(01-29-2011, 01:25 PM)Rofey Wrote:  Hi guys,

I'm new to the forums here, but I've been enjoying the tutorials on this site for some time.

I want to buy a new mini pump for my mountain bike, but I'm not really sure which ones are good. I don't need a top of the range model, I just want something that's straightforward to use, and is not going to break after a week. Being a mountain bike, my tyres have a Schraeder connection, and I think they're rated between 45-60 psi (although I know tyre pressures are a contentious issue), so it wouldn't have to be something that delivers super-high pressure.

I've been having a look at a couple of mini pumps - has anyone used or bought one of these, and are they any good?

- Zefal Air Profil Micro
- Beto 2-stage mini pump with gauge
- Quicker Micro

The Beto has a gauge, but looks like it'd be difficult to see while you're pumping. The Quicker Micro looks like you have to hold it on (rather than having a thumb lock).

Anyone have any other suggestions for a reliable middle-of-the-range mini pump that might suit?

Cheers (and thanks for reading),

Rofey

I have used Zefal and did not have any problems, also heard great things about them to. As far as the others I really can not say too much about. You located in Europe? Reason I asked is because there are members here that could assist ya better maybe?
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#3
Thanks Bill, I'm located in Australia. Which Zefal did you use?

Smile Rofey
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#4
Rofey I do believe it was this one... http://www.zefal.com/zefal/produit.php?key=840501&PHPSESSID=48ba27b9bcd9793dbf168df36c00c3f9 ... it was a different cyclist's. He was nice enough to asked if I needed to put some air in my tire. Hehe one of the few times I did not have anything with me and forgot to check the pressure before I went out Sad . It pumped up really well enough to make my ride smooth to get home. Smile By the way welcome to the forums! Big Grin
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#5
My thoughts on mini / hand / frame pumps...

Forget the gauge. It adds weight, bulk, parts and $. IMHO, these are a "get me home" tool and take second-stage to my floor pump at home. Everytime you air your tires, stop at certain pressures and give the tire a squeeze - fingers on rim, palm on tire. There is also the Thumb-press method. After almost 20 years of this method, on my familiar tires, I can get within 5 +/- psi of what pressure I am aiming for.

On the Valve issue, probably 99.5% of minis sold today are convertible -flip a couple of parts around. Some have dual heads.

Now... let's talk about Air! I am familiar with the Zefal APM. It is capable of 130 lbs. It's meant for road bikes and I pity the roadie that has to use that tiny thing all the way to even 90 psi.
With a MTB, or any balloon / low pressure tire, what we want is a pump that delivers more air volume per stroke. The most noticeable characteristic is a larger diameter barrel, regardless of the length. Of course, a longer stroke moves more air.
The reason that you don't want a big barrel for a roadbike pump? A large volume pump and a high pressure pump can't breed. It's a math subject for another thread. Most humans can't physically move a large volume of air at high pressures. Thus, pumps for road / high pressure tires move very little air per stroke. Make sence?

As far as brands go.. Zefal, Topeak, Serfas and Lezyne are the most popular in the US. Park, Wrench Force (Trek brand) and others are also great.
I, personally, tend to favor Topeak and vote Conservative. Again... a subject for another thread. Smile Oh me.

Since it seems that Zefal is easily available for you - check out the Lapize Mini Classic for a tiny one. The Mini Jet AP for an all-arounder.

Rob
(01-30-2011, 02:56 AM)Bill Wrote:  Hehe one of the few times I did not have anything with me and forgot to ...

Huh??? I think Bill might have a concussion.
Wheelies don't pop themselves. (from a QBP fortune cookie)
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#6
My cousin has this one and I am really impressed with it. Dunno why the mountain morph does not have an online gauge, though. http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/11585-245_TOPRM2-2-Accessories-37-Pumps/Topeak-Road-Morph-G.htm
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#7
Hmm. I do not think anyone has improved the bicycle pump in the last 50 + years
The one on sale works best. I got this one for $9.85.

http://www.mtbr.com/cat/accessories/pump/blackburn/mammoth-pump/PRD_352578_136crx.aspx


Here is another dual pressure one.

http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/category/tools/cycling-tools/mini-pump/product/mammoth-2stage-pump-33728e
As RobAR says most come with reversible valves.
Some pumps pump air on both strokes, have not tried one. Too pricey .

Bill: sorry I did not answer you.
RobAr: use a hammer.
Never Give Up!!!
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#8
I purchased a Giant mini-pump (my LBS is a big Giant dealer) with a gauge on it for my low pressure (40-65 psi), 700c x 45 tires on my hybrid. It has a switch on it to change from high pressure to high volume and works great until you reach somewhere in the neighborhood of 30-35 psi and then it's pretty much useless. I tried it once on my road bike just to see how it would handle it and again, after about 30 psi it was done for. I now keep it permanently on my hybrid and use CO2 cartridges on the road bike for emergencies. I have both a floor pump and a 12 volt compressor that I use before going on any of my rides.
HCFR Cycling Team
Ride Safe...Ride Hard...Ride Giant
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#9
Thanks Rob, so you'd suggest a Topeak large volume pump? Any models jump to mind? I haven't looked up the Topeak range yet...

GeorgeET, I took a look at the first link you posted, re the Blackburn Mammoth. A lot of people seem to swear by it, but a lot also seem to bag it. Took a look at the Blackburn site, and a few of their pumps seem to feature a "Twist Grip' head rather than a thumb lock head - not sure what the difference is. Do you know?
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#10
The lock is for locking the pump to the valve. The thumb version has a lever you swing 90 degrees to hold it to the valve, have not seen twist but you just rotate the head and it tightens on the valve. Twist grip sounds good, if it works as advertised.

Look at the photos you can see the gray swing out lever just above the black head, its in the down position. To change from shrader to presta valve the head unscrews and the insert is flipped. Easy.

IMO do not spend too much on a pump.They all last for years.
Never Give Up!!!
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#11
Lol , concussion Tongue ! Yes I admit I am not perfect hehe! At any rate I always thought of mini and micro pumps as an emergency accessory only. Everyone has their own opinion though too Wink . George as we say here in NY "forget about it" (on the not answering me) lol.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#12
Sorry I did not answer you Bill, but I am sure someone will. LOL..
Never Give Up!!!
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#13
I ended up going for a Topeak Mountain Morph, rather than a "mini" pump as such. Not too concerned about the weight or length, and so far I'm very happy with the speed and ease with which it inflates the tires.

I found the thumb lock very easy to attach to my Schrader valve, and was very happy with the seal it formed. Only problem is, after I've finished inflating the tire and release the thumb lock, it's nearly impossible to get the thing off my Schrader valve again! Had to pull so hard I was worried I was going to pull the valve off with it, and damn near sprained my wrist in the process.

Has anyone else had similar issues with using the Mountain Morph (or another Topeak with the same head)? Is it just a case of "wearing it in" over a few uses, or has anyone experienced this as a continuing problem? If I keep having to yank so hard to get the thing off, I'm worried I'm going to wreck the head (or my valves, or both). I'm starting to wonder if I'm going to have to slap on a bit of Vaseline every time I use it - which is a tad inconvenient when you're on the road.
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#14
Spray a bit of lubricant into the head. Silicone or Teflon. It should not be that tight , make sure that when you release the lock lever that the pump head opens up. Look inside and check operation.
Never Give Up!!!
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#15
Rofey! Glad you found your pump! The Topeak will serve you well.

George mentioned silicone and teflon as lubes on the valve. I recommend saliva. Just spit a little in the pump head before you press it on. Works great - and you don't have to walk around with a bottle of silicone in your pocket like George. Smile

To everyone with a Topeak product - after almost 20 years in the bike biz, I can't say enough about that companies Customer Service. It is seldom needed but... dig this...
Last summer, a guy comes in the shop with a Topeak Master Blaster Combo that I sold him 15 years ago. Seals were shot and would not go over 20 psi. I called Topeak with low expectations of parts availability.
The Topeak rep on the phone said, in short, "Don't hold your breath but, I'll see what I can find in the warehouse. We may have some, somewhere out there. Sell him a new X -X model. It's way better."
The Topeak rep never called back. We had given up. Then he came to buy a new pump one day as I was unpacking a UPS delivery. I spied a little, unexpected package and it was from Topeak.
Inside was a hand-written note that read - "Dear Robert. Sorry did not get back to you. The warehouse is clean but Steve had a few rebuild kits in his file cabinet. Enclosed are 2 of the last 10 in existance. Thank you for your support!".
We rebuilt his old MBC in 5 minutes. How cool is that!?
Wheelies don't pop themselves. (from a QBP fortune cookie)
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#16
It's good that you've had good luck with Topeak, I have not. The last occasion was with an old Joe Blow Pro floor pump.
I own a number of their pumps, I just don't buy any of their expensive stuff anymore.
The last one was a mini morph. It takes about 100 pumps to get an empty 26(559) x 1.9" to 30 psi
[Image: 3840]
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#17
Actually, for my mountain bike, or any big tire at 40-60 psi, this is my favorite get me home pump. One 16gram cartridge gets me 35psi with less effort & time than one stroke on my Mini Morph pump.

[Image: image.php?object_type=product&image_id=256]
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#18
That one looks nice. Now I just use a cheapo umm trying to remember the name of it pump. It isn't something I use often but had to a couple times and worked well. Sorry ,wait I think it is a Planet Bike?
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#19
I have a TOPEAK small pump for Presta or shraeder valves simply by turning the valve head from side to side. Fits into a small bag and will take on a 100psi load. Light and a great bit of kit. If you want a pic, their online site shows it.
Cycle the streets of Bristol!
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