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Remove rust from painted frame
#1
Greetings forum folks!

I'm wondering if anyone has any good ideas about how to best remove light rust from the frame without actually going all out; I don't really want to disassemble the bike and can live with a scuffed paint job that welcomes stickers, but I want to nip the problem before it grows...

I figure I would need to remove !ALL the rust and then clear coat, right?

Should I just use dry sandpaper or is there some solvent that will eat rust off steel that won't chemically react with the paint around it?

I've just gotten through S.O.Sing the chrome and it is amazing how much rust just rubs right out to shiny chrome! Looking forward to reading your suggestions...
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#2
I know that WD-40 gets out minor rust on the paint pretty well. Used some on my own bikes a few times. There is some kind of rust remover spray that's out there, can't remember what its called at the moment, that works well as I've heard. For the most part though, here in Hawaii bikes tend to rust quickly (might be an understatement right there haha) so we just sand the rust down with some fine grit dry sandpaper and the clear coat on top of it with rustoleum or any anti-rust paint. Most of the time it doesn't look too bad if you're careful with your sanding.
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#3
(02-08-2011, 09:02 AM)nameused Wrote:  I know that WD-40 gets out minor rust on the paint pretty well. Used some on my own bikes a few times. There is some kind of rust remover spray that's out there, can't remember what its called at the moment, that works well as I've heard. For the most part though, here in Hawaii bikes tend to rust quickly (might be an understatement right there haha) so we just sand the rust down with some fine grit dry sandpaper and the clear coat on top of it with rustoleum or any anti-rust paint. Most of the time it doesn't look too bad if you're careful with your sanding.

Sweet! I'll give it a whirl when the sun rises on california again....
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#4
Nameused probably has the best knowledge of rust being that he is from Hawaii.

You said you didn't want to go all out against the rust, but from my own experience, if you don't remove the rust completely, then it won't be long before you have to do it again.

There are some commercial rust removers available, but I have found that white vinegar from the grocery store is as good as any at a fraction of the cost. Since you won't find de-rusting instructions on a bottle of white vinegar, here is mine. Fill a container with vinegar, submerge for 2 hours, and then scrub the remaining black-oxide off quickly. Rinse and repeat if necessary. Smile

If you don't get it all in my instructions above, you at least have "converted" the remainder to something other than rust, and it will likely last much longer.

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
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#5
Vinegar eh?? Got to try that some time. My bike is too big to soak in it.:-))

There is Naval Petroleum Jelly, and Rust Reformer , both good for rust. Follow manufacturers directions. The reformer turns rust into a hard shell. Rustoleum Oil Enamel paints are great and is very durable. I just painted my spokes black with it after removing surface rust. For color matches I found automotive touch up paint to match my bike. Use a very small brush (not the one in the stick) and apply little dot dabs.

Also instead of sandpaper I use a small strip of fine Cracus Cloth (at paint and hardware stores) which is similar to a kitchen scouring pad. You can also use a plastic kitchen scouring pad. Put tape around areas you want to protect.

Whats this about no sun in California?? Its warm and sunny here. :-)))
Never Give Up!!!
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#6
Yes! You can also use Naval Jelly to remove the rust. It works really great, but it can also take the paint with it. I have used it before (not on bikes) and if you want to do a small area, put the jelly on a rag and rub it in as small an area as you can, then rinse it off. I would try it on some other painted material with rust, other than your bike, to see how it works and get the feel of doing small areas before you work on your bike.

George,

For touching up paint chips and scratches, I use a product called Langka (available from their web site only) and it is the best thing I have found for paint touch-ups, especially if there are chips in the paint. I use it on my show car and you can't even see what you touched up unless you know where the paint chip is. You use regular touch-up paint but you don't need to worry about not letting it show. You actually want to have a blob of paint over the chip. Let the paint dry then put some Langka on a soft rag and rub lightly. It will take the blob off leaving the chip filled with the paint.

When the paint dries for a day or so, I use Maguire's Quick Wax over the chipped area then use Maguire's Quick Detailer (several coats) to harden the paint and smoothen the surface. I use Quick Detailer on both my bikes anyway. Makes a big difference in the paint
HCFR Cycling Team
Ride Safe...Ride Hard...Ride Giant
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#7
10-4 JohnV, I added it to my links.

What show car do you have? Wish I still had some of the cars I had growing up, like a 1959 Buick Invicta 401, or a 1962 Dodge 383 with 3 duces. Both convertibles. They were affordable in the used car lots in those days.
Never Give Up!!!
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#8
(02-08-2011, 07:08 PM)GeorgeET Wrote:  10-4 JohnV, I added it to my links.

What show car do you have? Wish I still had some of the cars I had growing up, like a 1959 Buick Invicta 401, or a 1962 Dodge 383 with 3 duces. Both convertibles. They were affordable in the used car lots in those days.

George,

Right now I have a 2002 customized PT Cruiser. I had a 1965 Plymouth Sports Fury but sold it years ago. When I decided to get back into show cars, I cheated and got the PT because I didn't have to do much restoration. Besides that, I fell in love with the body style from the minute I first saw it. I know that this is a bike forum, but here's a picture of it anyway. There is a airbrushed hood liner that isn't in this photo because it was just a showing at a dealership (club sponsor) and wasn't a regular car show.

[attachment=1890]
HCFR Cycling Team
Ride Safe...Ride Hard...Ride Giant
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#9
Nice, I have seen them in a woody skin kit, cute.
Never Give Up!!!
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#10
(02-08-2011, 07:00 AM)moch Wrote:  Greetings forum folks!

I'm wondering if anyone has any good ideas about how to best remove light rust from the frame without actually going all out; I don't really want to disassemble the bike and can live with a scuffed paint job that welcomes stickers, but I want to nip the problem before it grows...

I figure I would need to remove !ALL the rust and then clear coat, right?

Should I just use dry sandpaper or is there some solvent that will eat rust off steel that won't chemically react with the paint around it?

I've just gotten through S.O.Sing the chrome and it is amazing how much rust just rubs right out to shiny chrome! Looking forward to reading your suggestions...

Hi,
My suggestion.....don't use any chemical on bike. Just wipe it little hard with a crunched piece of aluminum foil. in the beginning it may look reddish but just keep going till you feel it smooth with your finger & then wipe it with a little cloth wet with WD 40. this won't even scratch your old existing paint. I have tried it & came out with amazing result. Check out my 1958 Raleigh bike.
[size=large][font=Impact]Cyclostyle in style[/font][/size]
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#11
That's the second time I have read on this forum about using aluminum foil to remove rust. I'm definitely going to have to try that just to satisfy my curiosity.
HCFR Cycling Team
Ride Safe...Ride Hard...Ride Giant
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#12
Thanks for all these great ideas on derusting bikes, the initial test of the aluminum foil does look promising, so 8mll try it on the whole thing tomorrow when the sun rises again on california (because I go online at night when it's harder to see what I'm doing outside)....
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#13
(02-12-2011, 02:10 AM)JohnV Wrote:  That's the second time I have read on this forum about using aluminum foil to remove rust. I'm definitely going to have to try that just to satisfy my curiosity.

Yes I agree John I was trying to find the first one who shared that. Was in a hurry out the door as usual.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#14
(02-12-2011, 03:13 AM)moch Wrote:  Thanks for all these great ideas on derusting bikes, the initial test of the aluminum foil does look promising, so 8mll try it on the whole thing tomorrow when the sun rises again on california (because I go online at night when it's harder to see what I'm doing outside)....

May your bike shine with the rising sun on California. All the best.
(02-12-2011, 03:17 PM)Bill Wrote:  
(02-12-2011, 02:10 AM)JohnV Wrote:  That's the second time I have read on this forum about using aluminum foil to remove rust. I'm definitely going to have to try that just to satisfy my curiosity.

Yes I agree John I was trying to find the first one who shared that. Was in a hurry out the door as usual.

Yes Bill, that was me suggesting foil work. i done it on my Raleigh 1958, This foil beats anything for rust removal without scratching. And compared to most solutions I came across till today this is the cheapest one.......wht do U think?
[size=large][font=Impact]Cyclostyle in style[/font][/size]
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