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Steep Learning Curve!!
#1
Hey fellas,

I seem to be in the 'mistake making' phase of bicycle maintenance at the moment. I'm really hoping it will pass & I'll get more competent!!

So far, I've managed the following -

1) To strip the thread on the mount holding my right side master cylinder on the handlebar. So now I'm running with just the rear brake!! Slightly dangerous but managing so far. I don't know what I'm gonna do about this particular problem really. I can either send the brake to a Magura dealer in the UK who will fit a new Master Cylinder onto the hose, but at what cost? I've a feeling it might not be much more expensive to completely replace the brakes! But until then, just the one brake operational!

2) To strip the thread on my left side Sram X-9 trigger shifter, so although it's not totally wrecked it's not securely held in place on the handlebar! Cripes!! So that's looking like a new shifter required at £45-£50.

3) After something of an overhaul last weekend, which included the headest, I've put the forks back in the wrong way round!! And it gets better, I've managed 36 miles to work and back without noticing until today!! Feel like such a duchebag it's unreal.

So yeah, just thought I'd share that with you all. It certainly is a very steep & expensive learning curve for me at the moment!

Si
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#2
as they say you learn from your mistakes. I am new at this and learning step by step Big Grin good luck!
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#3
As far as the stripped threads are concerned, all is not lost. It may be cheaper to go to a hardware store and get a set of taps and just re-thread it if possible. If not, drill it out to the next screw size and tap it with new threads. Would certainly save on getting new parts. If you have to drill and tap, make sure that the drill bit goes in straight or your tap will cut at an angle keeping the screw head from being flush with the component it is securing.

And yes, you certainly do learn from your mistakes. Been there done that and on more expensive things than bikes.
HCFR Cycling Team
Ride Safe...Ride Hard...Ride Giant
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#4
(05-06-2011, 11:42 AM)johnj2803 Wrote:  as they say you learn from your mistakes. I am new at this and learning step by step Big Grin good luck!

Thanks mate, fingers crossed for a speedy recovery!

All the best to you too.

Si
(05-06-2011, 12:51 PM)JohnV Wrote:  As far as the stripped threads are concerned, all is not lost. It may be cheaper to go to a hardware store and get a set of taps and just re-thread it if possible. If not, drill it out to the next screw size and tap it with new threads. Would certainly save on getting new parts. If you have to drill and tap, make sure that the drill bit goes in straight or your tap will cut at an angle keeping the screw head from being flush with the component it is securing.

And yes, you certainly do learn from your mistakes. Been there done that and on more expensive things than bikes.

Thanks for the advice John.

I don't know the first thing about drilling, so I'd probably end up doing a Homer Simpson job where the drill suddenly starts carrying me away & drilling holes all over the bike! I may be able to get someone else to do it though. Like you say, would be a lot cheaper than replacing the whole unit.

In terms of the Magura brake mount, I'm afraid I can't do anything about that because the housing that surrounds the screw & thread had partially crumbled as a result of it stripping so not sure there's any fixing of that my friend! I could post a picture if you think there may be a salvage possibility?

Thanks kindly

Si
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#5
Posting a photo of the brake mount can't hurt. You never know what type of ingenious things people come up with.
HCFR Cycling Team
Ride Safe...Ride Hard...Ride Giant
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#6
Learning how not to strip threads is a valuable lesson that will serve you well your whole life!
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#7
One of my downhill friends turned me onto this little tip about the mounting of brake levers and shifters onto the handlebars...you don't want to tighten them down all the way because if you're in a crash they'll spin around the handlebar rather than just break off. Probably.

I was stripping threads like crazy, too, and then I bought a torque wrench.
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#8
Ye, welcome to the school of hard knocks. BTDT.
For tightening fasteners its not as hard as you can get it. Use a small wrench and just your fingertips, snug plus maybe half a turn more. Never force it.

AS per fixes post some photos. Who knows, there are many but can cost more than a new part.


If you are going to get a torque wrench get the smallest lowest scale you can find. See archives here for info.

Also find out if torque specs for your bike are available.
Never Give Up!!!
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#9
Here you are fellas, hopefully these pics are clear enough to show how the screw has broken through the housing part of the mount rendering the brake un-mountable.

[attachment=2340][attachment=2338][attachment=2339]

Hopefully some of you may have some cool ideas for me!

Thanks a lot

Si
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#10
Ye thats nasty. Looks like the bolt and threads are OK. Maybe you can bend a large washer or a piece of metal with fingers to grab the mount in the center grove, and than put hole in it for the bolt and re tighten gently.Kind of like your fingers curling and your hand bend up at the wrist.

Maybe the pin holding the broken part can be removed and new part put in??? Its one piece casting and does not look very strong, could be casting fault too. Contact manufacturer and complain.

Good photos BTW.
Never Give Up!!!
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#11
(05-08-2011, 04:53 PM)GeorgeET Wrote:  Ye thats nasty. Looks like the bolt and threads are OK. Maybe you can bend a large washer or a piece of metal with fingers to grab the mount in the center grove, and than put hole in it for the bolt and re tighten gently.Kind of like your fingers curling and your hand bend up at the wrist.

Maybe the pin holding the broken part can be removed and new part put in??? Its one piece casting and does not look very strong, could be casting fault too. Contact manufacturer and complain.

Good photos BTW.

Hiya pally wally,

Thanks, I tried my best with the pics. After all, the better I give you guys, the better advice I can receive!

Here's another pic...(need to click to enlarge, file size too big too attach directly to this site!)

[Image: 062f02131444188.jpg]



I tried putting a nail into that little hole and hammering out the pin but it won't come out. Any idea how I can remove it?

As for your suggestion, it sounds a bit complicated for a simpleton like me, but much appreciated, I'll give it a go I reckon!

Cheers

Si
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#12
Ye, good luck. It looks very thin where the bolt cinches it. Not well made IMO.

AS per photo, I always reduce my photos for email posting.

Its easy to take good photos with current digital cameras on macro setting. They have to be set up properly to start, as to type of light, asa, etc.You can also reduce memory in camera or after in computer.

Its frustrating seeing some blobs posted.
Never Give Up!!!
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#13
Hi guys,

Just a quick update for you all.

I've found a shop in the US that sells the bolt & clamp separately!

So all I need to do now is knock the pin out of the hinge somehow (already got a guy from work sorting it, says it's already half way out) then I can buy the part & have it shipped to the UK via US Postal Services.

Total cost is just over $60, so about £38. It is, admittedly rather expensive for such a small part, but it's probably cheaper than replacing the whole master cylinder & certainly cheaper than replacing the brakes entirely!

Si
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