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Rear fork teeth stripped
#1
So the rear fork or at least i think it's a fork is dimpled to help the lock nut to the axle hold tight. Well an old bike that it is has those dimples worn down now not even a lock washer will hold the axle. I bought two thick different sized washers. I am thinking if i get a big enough washer to grip the non-stripped part it'll hold the axle. Of not im out of ideas.

Any suggestions?
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#2
When metal wears like that then there is a time when to replace it, meaning in this case the frame needs replaced. I really do not know of any way to repair this. Sorry that is all I have for suggestions.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#3
By "rear fork" I assume you mean where the rear wheel bolts into the frame. This area wouldn't normally have dimples to prevent the wheel from slipping. But the end of the axle locknut (on the inside) and the axle nut (on the outside) do have to have a big enough surface area to grab on to to get a tight clamp. I've seen a lot of bikes where the dropout gets bent out a little or worn so the axle and nut really don't get enough surface area to clamp on to.

You can definitely get a bigger washer to go under the exterior nut. You don't want split/lock washers. What works better is a large diameter, thick washer. Preferably one that has knurled teeth on the inside to grab the frame better. Most bike shops would have these.

On the axle, it is possible to find a lock nut with a larger diameter, but this will be a little tricky. Just throwing a washer on the inside isn't usually a good idea.

But if the dropout on the frame is bent or seriously damaged, you need to decide if it will ever be able to grab the axle well, just needs a little clean up, or is too damaged.
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#4
without pictures; I am with Bill on this one.

there is too much risk of it breaking resulting in injury or worse.
Nigel
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#5
(06-14-2011, 07:31 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  without pictures; I am with Bill on this one.

there is too much risk of it breaking resulting in injury or worse.

It is still pretty thick and durable metal. All that is wrong is that the area is worn just enough to slip the lock nuts with no washers. I cant bend any of it by hand so guess its still strong.
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#6
Bull !!

If you put your hand on the floor, and someone your weight jumps on your fingers; will they be broken (.....yes).

The loads that a bike's frame, especially the dropout is many time the riders weight.
Nigel
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#7
How will i tell if the frame at the axle joint is bad then?
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#8
pictures would help; safest is to assume it is bad, and scrap it in such a manner that it can not be used again - cut it up.
Nigel
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#9
(06-15-2011, 12:44 AM)Rama Owhl Wrote:  All that is wrong is that the area is worn just enough to slip the lock nuts with no washers.

What the other commentors are getting at is that this statement could mean a lot of things. If it is just the surface of the metal on the frame is scratched up some, probably not a safety issue, but that wouldn't cause the axle to slip. If the notch/cutout where the axle goes has gotten bent out of shape, it may be fixable, or it may just snap off.

I wouldn't rush to destroy the frame. It may be fine and you just need some decent washers. But it could be a real safety issue. We just can't tell you for sure without seeing it and understanding better why the wheel is slipping.
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#10
Here are picture of the mountain bike. As I still believe, it is only the surface that is worn enough to cause the teeth on the nut to not hold. [attachment=2533][attachment=2534]
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#11
Yeah, the frame looks ok from what I can see. I think you should:
1. Make sure the derailleur hanger (the big silver thing in the 2nd photo) is pulled as far back in to the dropout as possible.
2. Make sure that the axle on the drive side is then pulled as far back as possible too.
3. Get some larger diameter, thick washers to go under the axle nuts. The kind of nuts you have technically don't need washers, the flared part at the bottom of the nut acts like a washer. But a good washer with teeth on the inner surface may help it get more bite. Note that the standard split lock washer here probably hurts rather than helps. Split washers are intended to help prevent a nut from vibrating loose/unscrewing, not to prevent it from slipping while it's tight.

If you can't get the axle nuts tight enough so they don't slip, what happens when you tighten them? It could be that the nuts and/or axle threads have stripped. Maybe you should try fresh nuts as well.

From what I can see, there is no problem on the frame. Frames do not normally have teeth or ridges to give the axle better hold. In fact, they're almost always smooth. I would actually recommend giving the clamping area on the frame a quick sanding to smooth out any little shavings of metal that have gotten torn up when the wheel has slipped. You want a nice flat clean surface for the nuts to clamp on to.
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#12
+1 I concur with DaveM
Nigel
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#13
Yes it looks good enough to fix! Smile . Pictures say 1000+ words.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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