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Anyone know how to "fade" paint colors?
#1
Hi to all.

I'm wanting to fix up an old MTB and want to use three colors (black for the front, yellow for the mid and red for the rear). I didn't want the colors to just abruptly meet but instead blend into the next. I'm unsure what this technique is called and the net provided no clues.

I guessed that it's a "fade" or "blend" technique but it's a mystery how this is done.

Can this be done via "rattle can" or is a shop needed for this effect?

Thanks.................Tom
2011softcruise


“Striker, listen, and you listen close: flying a plane is no different than riding a bicycle, just a lot harder to put baseball cards in the spokes.”
Airplane (1980) – Rex Kramer (Robert Stack)

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#2
My show car has faded black to gray in the flames that was done via a professional artist using an air brush. I think that you would have to be extremely good at it to be able to do it via a spray can. However, if you tried it, I would imaging that you would do the painting in reverse. Red painted solid where the yellow fades in and yellow solid where the black fades in. If someone has done this before and I'm off base, my apologies.
HCFR Cycling Team
Ride Safe...Ride Hard...Ride Giant
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#3
what color is the frame now? or are stripping it? if the frame is aluminum you should use a chromium primer. if steel I would prep and use a non sandable primer/sealer then paint then clearcoat. spray cans do not atomize like spray guns and may spittle here and there. and never seem to setup as hard as an automotive finish. however it could be done, just do not be to picky about the results after all it is your first attempt. on the fade it will be hard to start and stop your paint stroke evenly and you will overspray where you might not want it too.

there are other techniques that produce cool effects like a crackle. That is where the color you see through the cracks in the paint are one color of your choice painted first in enamel, then your main color painted next in lacquer. then let dry and clearcoat in polyurethane

the principle is this: enamel dries longer than lacquer so the lacquer cracks in an asymmetrical pattern revealing the color beneath, after that dries a day or two the polyurethane gives it the gloss and adds a little strength to the finish. Just another Idea to think about and you will not have to be so precise with your stroke and still have a unique and custom paint job. either way practice in scrap first, then go for it and have fun
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#4
Hi.
The frame is a gloss black (but rough) and is likely steel (but I'll confirm that later). I wanted to get my wife interested in biking and told her I would build a bike in her home country colors (Germany). I wanted to try to fade the color changes rather than solid borders but doing so from a can will be a challenge. I'm unsure about doing a total stripping of the frame and had planned to just lightly sand the original paint (some original paints work well for adhering to) but it's scratched and may prevent a nice covering. Perhaps spraying at a greater distance as I near the bordering color will create the effect I want.
2011softcruise


“Striker, listen, and you listen close: flying a plane is no different than riding a bicycle, just a lot harder to put baseball cards in the spokes.”
Airplane (1980) – Rex Kramer (Robert Stack)

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#5
The fading of paint requires very light trigger finger and a narrow spray pattern. In painting with spray cans or any other prep is the most important thing. If current paint is good no need to strip it, just sand it lightly with 400 grit wet, clean with paint prep cleaner use good primer and than paint. You can buy supplies at automotive paint shops, also lots of good info. Best to use supplies from the same manufacturer for compatibility. Kraylon is good.

Oil enamel is super durable but harder to work with and clean.

Practice technique before spraying the frame.

BTW you can get custom colors mixed and loaded into a spray can..

Few tricks in using spray cans , warm it up in a tub of warm water, shake well, shake frequently as you paint , clear nuzzle once in a while, start and finish spray pattern OFF the frame. This is very important, start spray off the frame spray across and past the frame and than stop.

As far as crackling, lacquer will lift enamel paint. You can spray enamel over lacquer but NOT the other way around. Do not ask how I know. :-))
Never Give Up!!!
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#6
always remember your tack cloth!
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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