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#1
Hi all, I am a new member here, so I thought I'd post some of the things made for my bike. It sees mainly messenger and hauler duties as much is accessible close to where I live.

I got tired of trying to re-do any commercially available rear racks, so I just made one:

[Image: bikerearrack2.jpg]

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[Image: bikerearrack3.jpg]

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[Image: bikerearrackrawmaterial.jpg]

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It was made from a waiting room chair that was discarded. You can see it before installation in that last picture (and a trailer that is mostly complete) You can see other raw materials, hockey nets and other stuff that was all tossed out on garbage day. That rack involved welding, but could be put together with a few sheet metal screws if anyone is interested in that approach. My bike, a Canadian Tire SUPERCYCLE was another garbage find at a neighbour's a few years back, and it is my Fav. it just rolls along forever.
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#2
Well done!
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#3
Well done!
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#4
HomeBrew is the best! Welcome aboard, Newton!
Wheelies don't pop themselves. (from a QBP fortune cookie)
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#5
I think Gary fisher started out that way! Seems as though your gonna make it.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#6
Very nice craftsmanship !!!! Welcome to BT . Smile
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#7
Thank- you! Another I came up with, is a truing stand, made from junk on hand. It might look incomplete, but was left that way so it can be table or vise mounted as needed. You could easily add a fixed adjustable finger or a dial indicator, but I have found that holding a lumber marking crayon out to the wheel indicates any "wows" in the rim accurately. At least, good enough for the girls I go with!!

[Image: truingstand1.jpg]

[Image: truingstand3.jpg]

Or in this vise, when not already being used as a "repair stand"

[Image: dscf0565b.jpg]

The material used was 1" square tubing with the internal piece sized for a close sliding fit, the upright arms are 3/8 X 1" steel stock. That square tubing came from office dividers and desk legs that were tossed out. The steel bar stock came from the junk yard many years back........I have a good supply of scavenged steel pieces from garbage days.
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#8
Good stuff Newton! That truing stand is the next project on my list. Smile

Thanks,
Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
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#9
Hi newton,
Been sometime, but I was looking through older posts and I noticed on this one the 2nd pic you have posted. Is that a bolt in the tube of the bike?
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#10
(01-28-2012, 01:38 PM)Bill Wrote:  Hi newton,
Been sometime, but I was looking through older posts and I noticed on this one the 2nd pic you have posted. Is that a bolt in the tube of the bike?

Holding on the bracket (that wasn't previously there?) Yes, that tubing was drilled and tapped on the outside section. But over the long run it was not enough to hold heavy swaying loads so it was welded, after that picture was taken. I took that measurement from another bike and was relatively sure the mounting bracket was located properly, just bolted it until I knew for sure.

[Image: bikerearrack3.jpg]

My welder.........

[Image: miller1351.jpg]
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#11
Yeah despite the awesome heavy duty home brew ya made, the concern i had was the fragileness of the metal tubing on the bike. An alternative is going to the seat post or tube? I know you said you just ended up welding it (not gonna much now lol). Still think and rate it an A+ Smile .

On the truing stand that is really sweet. You could add a dial indicator like nigel did here http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-3834.html if you are into it. It is really awesome to have a welder and skills as a machinists like yourself. I'm jealous already lol.

Bill
P.S. Nice welder Smile .
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#12
Hi Bill,

Thanks for that kind rating.

It is plenty strong enough for anything I'm about to haul. The tubing on bikes is amazingly tough stuff......no problem with my set-up breaking off or coming loose. If anything, that rear wheel (Spokes) is the weakest link.

I like to keep things simple as in that trueing stand and it works really well for me, on a bench or in a vise. I just hold a lumber crayon up to the rim to find the length of any "wow" and make adjustments to the spokes. I have a dial indicator that could be added, but find the crayon method good enough.

I'm no machinist by any stretch of the imagination, just picked up a few DIY skills along the way. Having a welder IS the way to go if you have the space available, it opens up a whole new window to DIY adventures.
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#13
Ok I see your point Smile. Your welcome on the compliment. Hmm I think I was reading another post that one member said they do machinist work then.
Anyways sounds like you are going with the welding though.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#14
That's truing stand is great. I hope you don't mind, but I'm going to make myself one just like it.
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#15
Be my guest, that is the whole reason for showing this stuff. I like simplicity!! A "no weld" similar version could also be made, with a few extra steps. A small grinder with a thin cutting wheel will take care of cutting up the pieces.
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#16
Good job man, you DIY bicycle accessories are great.
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