Bicycle TutorBicycle Tutor

Show off your bike!

Related video tutorials:
Tell me something about the 29's...
#1
Hi to all.

I'm starting to see more and more 29" bikes (especially cruisers) and wonder if the frames are the same as the 26's. The 29's look "oversized" but I'm interested in test driving one since I usually have a hard time being comfortable on the 26".

So..... what do you folks know about these 29's? Are they relatively new to the market? Are they truly a bigger frame than the 26" or just riding on oversized rims?

Some bikes just seem small to me and I feel cramped unless I start changing seat posts and H-bars.

Maybe I should move up to a 29?

Tom
2011softcruise


“Striker, listen, and you listen close: flying a plane is no different than riding a bicycle, just a lot harder to put baseball cards in the spokes.”
Airplane (1980) – Rex Kramer (Robert Stack)

Reply
#2
Yes and no, One can only re-invent the wheel so many times. Marketing, so called new Ideas, same thing with another name and so on pays the bills and feeds the family and just maybe puts the kid through college. One can make a bike with 12in. wheels with an axle spread same as a bike bike with 39r wheels and i have yet to ever buy a bicycle no matter the wheel size that one or two things to changer would not make it better for " me ". the key is know what to change, how to trim the cost of such changes and so on. If you walk into a bike shop and buy a bike, great for them. walk into a bike to buy a bike " but " say its almost perfect would you swap the stem for a higher rise and I think I would like a seat with more cushion. would you do that for the same price?
great for them and you. That is how you deal with a bike shop that cares and will do it.
95 % of people will buy a bike off the floor. so for the five% that need a little extra, I will do it if I can and is reasonable.
So, if you want a 29r get it the way you want it or do not get it at all. the size of the wheel will not help fit.It might roll over a two inch log wiith a 1\16 more tire patch than a 26in. wheel
but has nothing to do with "fit'
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
Reply
#3
PK - well said.

"29'ers" have the same diameter rims as "700c"; which is ISO 622. That means the part of the rim that the bead of the tires sits on is 622mm in diameter. "26" MTBs are ISO 559. So basically, you are getting an extra 63mm (2½") of diameter. Of course, 29er frames are configured so that the bottom bracket is only slightly higher off the ground than 26ers.

Because of the larger diameter wheels and tires, 29ers will have a softer ride, going over obstacles more easily. But that can be compensated for with lower tire pressure and softer suspension on a 26er.

Bottom line - find what works for you, your are the only one who can determine that.
Nigel
Reply
#4
yep 10-4 to that . I tend to ride bigger bikes than according to regulations I should ride. :-) Seen lots of dudahs come and go like pain said. Changing things sells bikes. For those that just got to have the latest ciackas.

I like to stretch and not ride like a grasshopper.

Its mostly the frame size that determines the fit. How tall are you?
Never Give Up!!!
Reply
#5
Hi and thanks to all for the reply's.

By the feedback given so far it seems the general consensus is that the 29's are a passing "fad". Myself being 6' I am unsure if the larger bike is the answer to my problems. I do like the idea of an adult bike thats fitting for adults but at what point is a bike limited?

If the 29's are a better bike then the "Darwin" effect should insure their dominance (although, products in the past have been successful because of popularity even though they were clearly 2nd best * remember the BETA?).

At any debate, larger wheels will require more power.....right?

Tom
2011softcruise


“Striker, listen, and you listen close: flying a plane is no different than riding a bicycle, just a lot harder to put baseball cards in the spokes.”
Airplane (1980) – Rex Kramer (Robert Stack)

Reply
#6
Tom;

Go for the bike that fits you; don't worry about the wheel size.

29ers are no more a passing fad than mountain biking. 90+% of road bikes are now ISO 622, (same as 29ers) Choices of 622 tires range from 20mm wide to more than 55mm wide.

My current bikes/projects have ISO 630 (commuter); 622 (tandem), 571 (SR Sierra) and 559. The 571 is probably going to be changed to 590, which is what the frame was deigned for, because of tire and rim availability.

If I hadn't scored a great set of 27 x 1¼ wheels, my commuter would probably be 622 now too.
Nigel
Reply
#7
In the UK a lot of people go to a bike shop for a sizing and fitting. This is a good idea if you have size or probs with backs and knees. I did this before building up a bike. The frame I got from Cinelli was a bit from what I was used to, but it worked out just great. Comfort improved big time. Also gave me the incentive to spend big bucks.........but that's another story. Safe riding. ( by the way, after looking at the spec sheet for my build I thought I had turned into Tolouse Lautrec!
Reply
#8
Welcome to biketutur ghost
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
Reply


Forum Jump:



ISSN 1918-3445 © Copyright 2007-2010 Bicycle Tutor / Privacy Policy / Created by Alex Ramon

feed