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Big trouble with BB
#1
Hi, Hello all, looking for some advice and direction on how to get out of the hole I'm in, thanks in advance for any assistance. In the process of rebuilding an old "Eddy Merckx" bike, all was going well until I met the Campagnolia Athenia bottom bracket. it was seized would not budge, so with brute force and a lot of stupidity I used all my strength and tore the splines off the drive side using the appointed tools of course, deciding to have a go at the other side was not a good decision as I have little or no splines left on the non drive side now. not easily phased I brought out my makitta drill which has left the bb not looking like a bb on the drive side. my hands are in the air at this stage and the drill is plugged out. I know its a bit late for this but am I turning this thing the right way? going with the drive, and where do I go next? I would consider myself handy enough when it comes to problem solving /repair but this is testing me so any help is appreciated.
Regards Con
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#2
Did you tried heating the BB with a blow torch??
Using a cheater bar on your BB removal tool??
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#3
(08-30-2011, 01:00 PM)bobtravers Wrote:  Did you tried heating the BB with a blow torch??
Using a cheater bar on your BB removal tool??

No haven't tried heat yet but will, pointless using BB too now as splines are damaged any other ideas ?
Thanks Con
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#4
Ye looks DOA. At this point you can drill lots of holes around the shaft (preferably with a drill press) and collapse the lock nuts.

OR you can try welding a bar to it after soaking it with liquid wrench or kroil overnight Than use heat and the welded on bar and hammer.

Be careful not to damage the threads, than replace with Shimano UN 54 or other. There are some threadless BB to if you damage the thread IIRC.

Perhaps a mechanic on this list will chime in.
Never Give Up!!!
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#5
(08-30-2011, 07:43 PM)GeorgeET Wrote:  Ye looks DOA. At this point you can drill lots of holes around the shaft (preferably with a drill press) and collapse the lock nuts.

OR you can try welding a bar to it after soaking it with liquid wrench or kroil overnight Than use heat and the welded on bar and hammer.

Be careful not to damage the threads, than replace with Shimano UN 54 or other. There are some threadless BB to if you damage the thread IIRC.

Perhaps a mechanic on this list will chime in.
I guess you knew there are left and right hand threads?!! I know it looks a mess but a good shop with a large vice and some thought will remove it. I have seen worse. I once took a frame like yours with a terminally seized BB to good metal work shop and smiles all round. NO blow torch!
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#6
We have done it gentlemen, bad bb gone, it took some more brute force, 76 prayers and yer support but the Mother is gone, so thanks, no lasting damage either. Have a good day Gentlemen and I hope ye are feeling as good as I am right now !
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#7
That's great. Good luck with your rebuild. Again suggest putting in a new sealed BB such as Shimano UN54.

How about providing some info on thread orientation and how you did it for future generations. :-))
Never Give Up!!!
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#8
And how did you manage to do it?
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#9
(09-01-2011, 07:26 AM)Joe_W Wrote:  And how did you manage to do it?

Hi all , As advised I drilled as much as I could around one cup ,without damaging the threads ,chipped at any remaining fragments and with a few repeated belts of a hammer the main body of the BB came out ,,this left me with room to work on the two cups , the one on the non drive side was first to go ,,I cut two notches in the cup ( pic 1 )found a tool ( a hatchet pic 2 ) to act as a lever gave her a few solid blows with a club hammer and hey presto ,,movement ,,,It felt as if I had a strong breeze at my back now and all the hours of training had just kicked in :-) ,,the other side needed some taught as there was no room for "notches" ,,with the hacksaw I cut many times eventually leaving two smooth groves into the side-walls of the cup and manipulated a piece of steel to fit snugly there in ( pic 3 ) luckily there was a hole in this piece of steel that allowed me to lever a bar off of it ( pic 4 ) ,,I should have stated that I soaked cups with WD40 prior to hack-sawing and these fittings had to be precise !
Thanks again for the support ! Con
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#10
Well done! - it shows what determination and a little care can do. A shimano sealed unit will fit well. Use a LOT of Lithium grease on the threads.
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#11
Great job I like your home made tools and the hatchet job. :-))

Soaking is very critical, as is use of heat. Here is a test of penetrating oils I got once.
I always soak nuts a day before removal.

"Machinist's Workshop magazine actually tested penetrants for break
out torque on rusted nuts. Significant results! They arranged a subjective
test of all the popular penetrants with the control being the torque
required to remove the nut from a "scientifically rusted" environment.

Type of penetrating oil ..... Average load

None ................................ 516 pounds

WD-40 ............................ 238 pounds

PB Blaster .......................214 pounds

Liquid Wrench .............. 127 pounds

Kano Kroil .................... 106 pounds

ATF-Acetone mix......... 53 pounds

The ATF-Acetone mix was a "home brew" mix of 50 - 50 automatic
transmission fluid and acetone.

Note the "home brew" was better than any commercial product in this
one particular test. A local machinist group mixed up a batch and all now
use it with equally good results. Note also that "Liquid Wrench" is about as
good as "Kroil" for about 20% of the price."
Never Give Up!!!
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#12
(09-01-2011, 10:29 PM)GeorgeET Wrote:  Great job I like your home made tools and the hatchet job. :-))

. . . ATF-Acetone mix......... 53 pounds

The ATF-Acetone mix was a "home brew" mix of 50 - 50 automatic
transmission fluid and acetone.

Yup, I second the home brew mix as XLNT.

Also, as "ghost" mentioned in post #5, a good vise is essential for serious metal and mechanical work. You might not need one tomorrow, but you will in the future and is well worth the money. You can find some good brands selling used at a fraction of a new one. Make sure you can open and close the jaws easily, the jaws line up properly and nothing is cracked or broken. Stay away from the Chinese imports as a general rule though.

SOME GOOD VISE BRANDS:
Wilton
Columbian
Reed
Morgan
Older Craftsman (same as Columbian)
the BEST = Charles Parker (aka Chas Parker), and Prentiss

Many of those are collectible now so you'll always be able to sell it for about the same or more than you paid. Just some thoughts. Smile

Steve
Junkyard Tools rescued from the junkyard!
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#13
(09-01-2011, 10:29 PM)GeorgeET Wrote:  Great job I like your home made tools and the hatchet job. :-))

Soaking is very critical, as is use of heat. Here is a test of penetrating oils I got once.
I always soak nuts a day before removal.

"Machinist's Workshop magazine actually tested penetrants for break
out torque on rusted nuts. Significant results! They arranged a subjective
test of all the popular penetrants with the control being the torque
required to remove the nut from a "scientifically rusted" environment.

Type of penetrating oil ..... Average load

None ................................ 516 pounds

WD-40 ............................ 238 pounds

PB Blaster .......................214 pounds

Liquid Wrench .............. 127 pounds

Kano Kroil .................... 106 pounds

ATF-Acetone mix......... 53 pounds

The ATF-Acetone mix was a "home brew" mix of 50 - 50 automatic
transmission fluid and acetone.

Note the "home brew" was better than any commercial product in this
one particular test. A local machinist group mixed up a batch and all now
use it with equally good results. Note also that "Liquid Wrench" is about as
good as "Kroil" for about 20% of the price."
That is interesting George especially the ATF/Acetone mix. Very significant results!
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#14
Yep, not too many places to get acetone anymore. Steal your wifes nail polish remover.:-)

Acetone also is a great final preassembly cleaner . Mostly engine work.

Vintage motorcycle mechanics I know working on rusty bikes like Kroil. Use in a ventilated space.

BUT home made is still great and cheap. I mixed some and keep it in a spray bottle. Shake well before use, as with all sprays.

Hey KC I got an old Craftsman vise, and also a large old vise I left at my brothers house. Will look up maker. That one is at least 50 years old.
PS in addition to a vise, c-clamps are very useful.
Never Give Up!!!
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