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Bike has valves I've never seen before
#1
I have just moved to Germany and I've got a 2nd hand bike. The front tyre has a normal valve and I had no difficulty pumping it up, however the back tyre has a weird valve. I thought to start with that it was a funny looking presta valve, but when I started to unscrew it as if to pump it up, all of the air came out and eventually 2 pieces came off.

I have put the 2 fallen-off pieces back on, but I still have no idea how to pump up the tyre. My German is not good enough to ask someone in real life to help me, so I'm a bit stuck. I have included 2 pictures which show the valve.

This is the pump I have: http://www.sks-germany.com/?l=en&a=product&r=mini%20pumps&i=557391250000&AERON and it has different settings which means it can pump 3 different types of valve but it doesn't describe the valves so I don't know which one is mine.

I would really appreciate any advice about which valve this is and how to pump it up. Thank you!
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#2
You are missing a small pieco of rubber tubing that should cover the hole in the valve. Most repair kits sold in Germany (used to? didn't buy one in ages) have one of those or even a valve. Those were the standard bike valves in Germany for quite a while. They are called Dunlop valves and use the same pump setting as French valves (Presta). Either: get replacement valve (you already know how to change them), the piece of rubber tube or a replacement tube. In order to pump it up you do not need to unscrew it, just pump. If you just go to a bike shop with the valve they might just give you one form the spare bin (or the little piece of tube that is missing). Many people in Germany understand English well enough to help you (I guess). Where are you in Germany (just curious)?
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#3
Thank you very much!
There is a piece of rubber tubing in the puncture repair kit. But I'm not really sure how it would cover the hole. It's very small. How exactly do I put it on? Sorry for so many stupid questions!
I'm in Konstanz. It's a lovely city and everyone cycles everywhere. I'm hoping having a bike will make it easier to get around the place at least until it snows.
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#4
The small piece of rubber pushes over the valve part with the small hole in the side. Put it back together, with the rubber down inside the tube and screw it together. Pump up like Joe said and that's it. These types of valve have a habit of losing the rubber tubing in the tube.
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#5
sorry to contradict the people who said you need valve rubber, you do not, this type of woods valve has a built in one way valve, once it is properly installed on the stem, it will inflate using a presta valve fitting, just make sure the retaining nut is screwed down properly and there is no dust or grit on the rubber seating ring.
You can check for leaks by wetting the end and looking for bubbles, if it leaks, replace, most bike shop should have stock for coppers.
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#6
Hi trev, you are absolutely right about the spring loaded newer type that does not need a piece of rubber tubing, but there is another type that needs the piece of tubing. Usually found in the Netherlands, Germany and also in Asia. I think the piece of tubing in the young lady,s repair kit threw us. You had to use spit to push the new piece of hose on. Glad that Presta is now used.
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#7
Hm, I think you might be right... there is two kinds of Dunlop valve around. I seem to recall that the newer ones the "Blitzventil" (which is according to trevgbb what you have, the type without the rubber tube) sometimes would get stuck. I usually replaced them with a spare (after a while you have tons), but you might be able to get it working again. Replacing is the most hassle free solution. Take it to a bike shop with a worried expression and they'll help you (at worst you'll buy a new tube, which is around 7 EUR).
Also: I've not yet been to Konstanz, only to the area to the south east and down the Rhine valley to the West which is both very nice.
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