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Reversing a seat post. Anyone done it?
#1
When I had my Retul fitting done on my road bike, I was riding the bars with my hands at the bend. The bike was adjusted for that position and worked great until I started riding the hoods. The new position now puts me at a lower profile but also puts me a bit more forward on my saddle and I keep sliding forward which is causing me to not sit on my sit bones as I should be and is causing numbing issues. My saddle is as forward as it can go on the seat post, and I need to move it forward some to solve this problem or start riding stiff armed and have pain in the hands and elbows.

I have been to bike shops looking for a new saddle that may have slightly longer rails that would solve the issue, but have come up empty handed. One LSB suggested to reverse the seat tube, which would give me more room on the rails to move the saddle forward. I have been hesitant to do this because I am not sure if the weight bearing on the saddle mount in the opposite direction will cause the carbon fiber seat post undue stress, since it was not designed that way. My question, "Has anyone reversed their carbon seat post to get a more forward position out of their saddle and if so, has it stressed the seat post any?"

My other option is to get a shorter stem, but I would rather see if reversing the seat post is also a viable option. I haven't yet talked to my fitter, but that is the next thing that I am going to do. Thanks for any help and suggestions.
HCFR Cycling Team
Ride Safe...Ride Hard...Ride Giant
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#2
I would guess it would be alright since you are still stressing the post in the same orientation. But that is a guess, it's possible there could be some risk on an ultralight post. Note also that the clamp area may or may not be able to put the seat level if you turn it around. Some seat post clamps do not have enough range of motion to make the seat level when reversed.

But the bigger issue is that this isn't the right way to fit the bike. You should adjust the seat and post to position your knees and leg extension properly and then change the front end around to get the reach you need.
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#3
"But the bigger issue is that this isn't the right way to fit the bike. You should adjust the seat and post to position your knees and leg extension properly and then change the front end around to get the reach you need."


YES ,+1 to what Dave said. The handlebars allow different hand positions to rest your hands and body. Locking in a fit for only one position negates all that.

Maybe OK if all you do is track racing.
Never Give Up!!!
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#4
Quote:clamp area may or may not be able to put the seat level if you turn it around.

^^ This.

Reversing the seat post causes the saddle to not mount level. I didn't think it would really work that well but it was worth a shot until something more permanent came along since it was recommended by one of the LBS's. I am going to drive down to the fitter on Monday and see if he can get a shorter stem and maybe a different saddle to solve this problem. Thanks for the replies.
HCFR Cycling Team
Ride Safe...Ride Hard...Ride Giant
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#5
Hey Dave. If your current post has an off-set, why not try a straight post? Would approx 20 mm help you (most common road off-set is 20)?
Wheelies don't pop themselves. (from a QBP fortune cookie)
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#6
I went to two other shops and both have told me not to reverse the seat post but to get a shorter stem, so that is what I will do on Monday. I am also thinking of getting a new saddle that will be more comfortable on all these long distance charity rides that I do. I was looking at the ISM Century or the ISM Typhoon saddle. Has anyone used either of these saddles and if so, what are your thoughts?
HCFR Cycling Team
Ride Safe...Ride Hard...Ride Giant
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#7
(11-12-2011, 12:46 PM)JohnV Wrote:  I went to two other shops and both have told me not to reverse the seat post but to get a shorter stem, so that is what I will do on Monday. I am also thinking of getting a new saddle that will be more comfortable on all these long distance charity rides that I do. I was looking at the ISM Century or the ISM Typhoon saddle. Has anyone used either of these saddles and if so, what are your thoughts?

They look like interesting saddles. But I'd suggest not getting too squishy of a seat. If the seat is too squishy, your sit bones will sink in and create friction (chafing). Not what you want on an endurance ride.

I'm related to a group that rides from SF to LA every year and does other centuries or double centuries. Very few of the veterans I know have squishy seats. Most are pretty hard, with a very slight give. Although they do buy shorts that are usually > $80 with closed cell foam or gel.


Andrew
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#8
Andrew,

The ISM saddles are not cushy at all. The OEM saddle that I am riding now is a standard road saddle but because of all the sliding that I have been doing lately, it's starting to wear and is starting to get a very slick and shinny surface. I need to change the saddle anyway so I was looking at the ISM saddles because the design is such that the private parts hang over the edge of the split horn which takes the pressure off of the perineum.

The bike shop that carries these has a rental/loaner plan where you can try out a saddle for a day or two before you buy it so that you don't dump $100.00 on a saddle that you don't like. I think they only do this with saddles costing $75.00 or more. I have an appointment next week with my Retul fitter to see what size stem I need to drop down to. It's currently a ±0º rise at 110 mm. and I think that I am going to need something like a 90 mm stem.

As for the shorts, all my shorts are Pearl Izumi Attack shorts. They are the most comfortable shorts I have tried and do very well on my long distance rides. They retail at $75.00 each.
HCFR Cycling Team
Ride Safe...Ride Hard...Ride Giant
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#9
This saddle was a total why did I not do it sooner Eureka moment. Very comfy... Leather and Kevlar and ti rails...


http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_202102_-1___


This is similar . No ti or Kevlar.

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_522820_-1___
Never Give Up!!!
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#10
George,

Do you have that saddle on your road bike? Looks promising, however, I have never purchased a saddle on-line unless I have seen it in hand first, so I am a bit skeptical. If I can find one locally to look at, I will consider anything that works.
HCFR Cycling Team
Ride Safe...Ride Hard...Ride Giant
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#11
I use the Terry Liberator Y on my MB, its great but for my RB I wanted a lighter sleeker saddle so I got a Nashbar TFX which is similar to Terry FLX . Not as comfy as the liberator but sexy. :-))
Its still good . I like them both. For distance I still recommmend the Liberator Y. Consider the Liberator race saddle.

You can always return it.

Got them from Nashbar, after some research, without test ride and am happy with both.

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_174722_-1___

http://www.terrybicycles.com/Saddles/Mens-Saddles/Liberator-Race-Saddle
Never Give Up!!!
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