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Pedal slip but not usual problems?
#1
okay so a bit of backgroundor jump two paragraph two if i bore you, its a shogun paranoid MBT which has been OEM untill recent. i have had the bike for around 5 years (i think its a long time) anyways i rode the bike 8 miles a day up hills and thrashing it without servicing or even cleaning (i was only 14 when i got it), so after 8 miles a day 5 days a week for 2 years the pedal started to slip but the arrival of my driving license at 16 had it put away and not used. about 6 months ago i got it back out to find wrecked chain and front forks, new identiti jump forks and pig steering head plus a new chain fitted badly i gave up. until this week i got it back out got some new grips and a new chain.

okay so new chain with no stiff links - check
derailleur aligned - check i spent 4 hours myself then handed it to my dad who did it in about 10 minutes lol
no wobble in the bottom bracket - check

so pedal still slips at about 10 o'clock and 4 o'clock? tempted to go to halfords but hate paying for it to be done especially after being ripped off by other shops! any ideas? going to check teeth on all sprockets but it happens when im pedaling with torque behind it in ALL gears.

i want to go play with my new jump forks but cant unless i want ripped up shins Sad

sorry its so long and thank you all
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#2
It sounds like you probably have worn chainrings. Check "Chainwheel Repair" on this site and compare the pictures of worn chainrings to yours.

http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/fix

Ride on, keep on riding
Riding on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on
Ride on, gonna have myself a good time - AC/DC

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#3
If the bike has never seen servicing in its life, I think as barefooted said the chain wheels and rear cluster should have been replaced with the new chain. With the new chain fitted, the wear pattern on the chain wheels will amplified making it slip over these two. I hope you lubricate the new chain that your dad fitted.
Cycle the streets of Bristol!
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#4
i fitted the chain so yes lots of wd40 was used.
im s bit new to actually looking for wear on bicycles so heres some pictures of the rings and derailleur alignment. tell me what you think?

sorry if the quality isnt good its off my blackberry
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#5
There is wear more noticeable on the rear cluster. I would change this unit ASAP. Best of luck. Do not use WD 40 as a chain lube. Use a proper chain lube and often.
Cycle the streets of Bristol!
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#6
Could this be causing the jumping pedal? And I though some lubricant was better than none so don't get at me for that I could have left it dry.
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#7
I agree with ghost on the rear cluster and WD 40. Because the chain is on the middle chainring, I can't see the teeth in your pictures. If you use the middle front chainwheel most of the time, it could be worn also. Compare the teeth on the middle one to the other two chainwheels. WD 40 is a solvent based cleaner with a small amount of lubricant. It is only good for door hinges and other low stress applications.

Ride on, keep on riding
Riding on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on
Ride on, gonna have myself a good time - AC/DC

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#8
(03-05-2012, 11:03 AM)jackojeff Wrote:  Could this be causing the jumping pedal? And I though some lubricant was better than none so don't get at me for that I could have left it dry.

Not getting at you , but most damage like this is caused by the wrong lube or none at all. When you get it sorted out remember to lube the most hard working part of your bike.
Cycle the streets of Bristol!
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#9
(03-05-2012, 02:16 PM)ghost Wrote:  
(03-05-2012, 11:03 AM)jackojeff Wrote:  Could this be causing the jumping pedal? And I though some lubricant was better than none so don't get at me for that I could have left it dry.

Not getting at you , but most damage like this is caused by the wrong lube or none at all. When you get it sorted out remember to lube the most hard working part of your bike.

I always thought I was the hardest working part of the bike.

Anyway,

There are plenty of bike-specific cleaners and lubes out there and WD-40 isn't one of them. Not even close, keep it away.
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#10
Okay then I have some motorcycle chain oil think that is more than up to the standard if it lubricates my chain at 160 mph Wink okay that was just to antagonize! Anyways so it is most likely chain rings and say I buy new chain rings and it still does it ? What then ?


Although I just antagonized you all, thankyou for your help so far and the telling off of wd40 will do me good in the long run Smile
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#11
I always lube the hardest working part of the bike when I get home, sometimes even during the ride- I have a ice cold beer or two!

Ride on, keep on riding
Riding on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on
Ride on, gonna have myself a good time - AC/DC

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#12
(03-05-2012, 11:30 PM)barefooter Wrote:  I always lube the hardest working part of the bike when I get home, sometimes even during the ride- I have a ice cold beer or two!

Motorcycle chain oil is not okay as it is specific for the speed and load of a high speed motorcycle chain. You need a chain lube for bicycles as the previous reply noted. Finish line wet lube is one I have used for a long time. There are a lot out there that are just as good. By the way I ran and maintained a Police Motorcycle garage for 18 years and I know my chains. Careful riding.
(03-06-2012, 12:57 AM)ghost Wrote:  
(03-05-2012, 11:30 PM)barefooter Wrote:  I always lube the hardest working part of the bike when I get home, sometimes even during the ride- I have a ice cold beer or two!

Motorcycle chain oil is not okay as it is specific for the speed and load of a high speed motorcycle chain. You need a chain lube for bicycles as the previous reply noted. Finish line wet lube is one I have used for a long time. There are a lot out there that are just as good. By the way I ran and maintained a Police Motorcycle garage for 18 years and I know my chains. Careful riding.

By the way, you did not antagonize me.
Cycle the streets of Bristol!
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#13
I was joking about motorcycle oil its actually too sticky for bicycles! Anyways so I asked at a bike shop who confirmed that its the casette bearing and the worn rings won't help so I'm looking for an 8 speed casette now and as always I want to upgrade to better quality. So what's been used and aproved? Its a shimano system and I've been told I can't use sram casette due to rest being shimano ? Is this correct?
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#14
Sram 8 speed and shimano 8 speed cassettes are interchangeable. You may only have to change the front middle chainring, but I have been advised not to mix chainring brands. Also, if you did not use a quick link to join the chain, check the chain for a stiff link.

Ride on, keep on riding
Riding on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on
Ride on, gonna have myself a good time - AC/DC

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#15
No stiff links I've checked and thanks for that I will get shimano seen two different ones a hg41 and a hg51 they seem similar only difference I can tell is that hg51 say its for narrow chains? Any other shimano 8 speed that are suppose competition spec?
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#16
I have used an hg51 11-30 an hg70 11-28 and I can't tell the difference other than the gearing steps are tighter on the 11-28, which I like. The hg51 is one step above the hg41, either one would probably work for you.

Ride on, keep on riding
Riding on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on
Ride on, gonna have myself a good time - AC/DC

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#17
okay now im confused i bought the bike new it came in a box and everything. ive taken the rear wheel off to find SRAM casette :S but the gear shifters and derailleur are shimano, so what happened to keeping to all the same make ? still go for shimano or keep oem and go sram?
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#18
You can use either a sram or shimano REAR Cassette without problems, they are the same cog spacing wise. I have been advised not to mix FRONT Chainrings - ie don't put an sram chainring on with shimano chainrings if you replace only one.

Ride on, keep on riding
Riding on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on
Ride on, gonna have myself a good time - AC/DC

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#19
While the cassettes are compatible and can be used with either SRAM or Shimano, you should not mix the dérailleur - shifter combo: Shimano dérailleurs are only compatible to Shimano (ok, and microshift) shifters, SRAM only goes with SRAM (this is due to the different amount of cable they pull per gear shift).

Chains: The hg41 is a 7 speed chain, the 51 is 8 speed. Essentially those are very similar (judging from sprocket spacing, only .05mm difference). Either could work, the hg51 is the more correct one. As far as I understand, the hg70 is slightly higher in the component hierarchy, though I'm not sure if they only differ in the finish. Some chains have outer plates that are less susceptible to surface rust (only cosmetic).

Oh, and as it has been remarked: using WD40 on a chain is worse than no lube, it is (mostly) a solvent and flushes out the lube from the links and ruins the chain. You do not need to lube a new chain, the factory applied stuff is better than anything you can do. The rest of the story (what to use, whether to clean using a chain cleaning machine, how often, etc.) all depends on what you do with the bike and is discussed with almost religious devotion to one's own standpoint, leading to holy-war-like flaming, backed up mostly with purely anecdotal evidence.
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#20
A great bit of info about compatability joe and your piece about WD40 is true. The weather in the UK is wet and chain lube is needed otherwise you are looking at excessive wear and a rusty chain. I personally use WD as a cleaner of the chain and then re-lube. I have been cycling for 35 years and this is purely what is good for me. I agree with you on this silly flaming on the blogs.
Cycle the streets of Bristol!
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