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Ross (Hybrid?) bike
#1
[attachment=3318]Here are a couple pics of a Ross bike I picked up.[attachment=3317]

It's shiny chrome finish really hooked me. But it looks like nothing is original to the frame. New crank, brakes, chain, sprockets, the works. Also the frame itself seems well made and too beefy for a road bike, but it has road tires. Great riding bike. Has anyone had experience with one of these types of Ross bikes? From what I have read they made entry level type bikes until they went under- but this is a very nice frame.
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#2
A nice commuter!
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#3
Definitely something someone put together.

I worry a bit about the brake levers with the V-brakes - do those levers provide enough travel for the brakes? Other styles of brakes have much less cable travel.

There are devices called "travel agents" that provide increased travel for use with standard travel levers and linear pull brakes.

Nice long wheel base - just needs fenders Smile
Nigel
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#4
(07-09-2012, 02:00 AM)nfmisso Wrote:  Definitely something someone put together.

I worry a bit about the brake levers with the V-brakes - do those levers provide enough travel for the brakes? Other styles of brakes have much less cable travel.

There are devices called "travel agents" that provide increased travel for use with standard travel levers and linear pull brakes.

Nice long wheel base - just needs fenders Smile

They don't really. They do function, but only start grabbing when there is 1/2" of space to go before the levers contact the handlebars. The brakes feel "mushy".

Once I did have to mash down on them in an emergency stop- and I was relieved that they did indeed stop the bike when it was very much needed. But some better brakes would be most welcome. I'll look into travel agents- thanks.

Fenders... that would help in keeping that shiny metal clean too- I swear it shows every little splash of mud!
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#5
Fenders, check out SKS Commuter Fenders; I have them on two bikes; they are clear plastic and painted on the inside, so easy to keep clean and shiny.

http://www.amazon.com/SKS-Commuter-Bicycle-Fender-Trekking/dp/B000X5YJJK/

See:
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-2920.html
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-3216.html

Travel Agents:
http://www.amazon.com/Problem-Solvers-Travel-Agent-Roller/dp/B00014HA76/
Nigel
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#6
Thanks for the great info, and food for thought. Had been out of cycling for a while and have rediscovered it's attractions. Got the bug now in a serious way, LOL.

What do you think of that Shimano crank/ gearset? Is it a decent setup? The bike shifts well, but for some balkiness @ the front at times. Doesn't want to shift easily into the topmost gear. The rear derailleur is a Suntour Superbepro (their spelling) the front Shimano.The shifters themselves are marked Centeron Altus. Strangely sometimes it shifts onto the top gear smoothly, other times it just grinds and I'm a sitting duck. Once it's in gear all is good.
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#7
(07-11-2012, 10:42 PM)Eric 13 Wrote:  ...

What do you think of that Shimano crank/ gearset? Is it a decent setup? The bike shifts well, but for some balkiness @ the front at times. Doesn't want to shift easily into the topmost gear. The rear derailleur is a Suntour Superbepro (their spelling) the front Shimano.The shifters themselves are marked Centeron Altus. Strangely sometimes it shifts onto the top gear smoothly, other times it just grinds and I'm a sitting duck. Once it's in gear all is good.

Shimano stuff if fine.

The front derailleur may need to be adjust to provide a smidge more travel when going into the big chainwheel - turn the H adjust screw in 1/8 turn increments - too far and the chain will sail past the chainwheel. It is a tough balancing act.

The crankset you have is a very low end MTB - extremely reliable, and will last forever, the only downside being wieght.

The Suntour equipment is excellent - too bad the company did not understand pricing and funding development, and thus went under. Suntour's equipment was way under priced compared with the competition, so the company did not make enough to fund continued R&D. The best rear derailleurs made today are all copies of Suntour inventions.
Nigel
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#8
I received a e mail notification of an answer on this forum. It doesn't show up here- but the gist of it was asking how much I paid for this bike.

$200 was the asking price, I actually spent $20 less when it was said and done. Added the new saddle and rack later for around $40.

Can truly say not one ounce of buyers' remorse whatsoever. Worth every cent and then some. Dang, bikes are great!
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#9
[attachment=3323]My new bike!!
Just wanna ride!!!
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#10
That there is one fine looking ride! Enjoy it!
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#11
As a little project for the weekend I'm looking at replacing the current tires on this bike which are dry rotted.

Some confusion has ensued in regards to the proper tire to buy.

The tires are marked 26x1.38.

The rims (Giant) are marked 26x1.5-2.0.

Should I look for 1.5's or 1.38's? I want a skinny road type tire. There is some info out there that there are different 26" rims, and not all 26" tires interchange.
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#12
(08-09-2012, 10:33 PM)Eric 13 Wrote:  Some confusion has ensued in regards to the proper tire to buy.
The tires are marked 26x1.38.
The rims (Giant) are marked 26x1.5-2.0.

Are the tires marked 26 x 1.38" or 26 x 1 3/8" (as in three eighths)? Gotta be decimal if the rims are marked that way. Is there another number with 559 x something, the ETREO #, eg; 559 x 35 ?
Your handlebars would indicate more of a road bike than anything. I'm heavy so I like plump tires, you would seem to favor something slimmer.
It's all about the budget. Kenda gives excellent value, Schwalbe are very good but often twice the price.
What would you like to see improved? Better cushion, flat protection, dirt pathway performance or just something decent for reasonable money?
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#13
Tires are decimal, 26x1.38. So as long as I stick to the decimal tires in the size range on the rim (26x1.5-2.0) I should be good to go? (No ETREO)



I enjoy the ride the current tires give, they look like plain jane Kenda road tires. That would be good. Plus thorn resistance would be a plus. Goat head country. Thinking about thick tubes. Anyway something decent for the money.

Thanks for your time!
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#14
Your weight is a consideration too.
I think a blackwall (no orange/yellow) would look good.
Do you want to add lights & ride at night frequently? If so, get a tire with a reflective strip on the sidewall. The Schwalbes with this feature are super reflective (but $$).

The manufacturers that I'm aware of skip your size (except here, 3rd model down. Here on sale.) & make 26 x 1.25 & 1.5" wide tires. The ETRTO size is supposed to be the actual width measurement in mm. For instance, your tire might have said 559 x 35.

The Pasela TG is lightweight and has puncture protection, but it's available in 26 x 1.25 & 1.5. (26 x 32 & 38mm).
Kenda Kwest about $50/pr. Kenda Kwick Roller has better flat protection at $60/pr. The Kendas are wider at 40mm.
I tell you, a set of Schwalbe Kojacks might be fun for speed at $70.
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#15
Have my eye on these

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Bell-Sports-26-Ultimate-Commuter-Comfort-Tire/15188841

26x1.75

Seems a good enough basic kind of tire- although the "comfort" designation makes me feel a bit wimpy, lol.
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#16
Took the plunge and picked up a pair of 26x1.75's from Wal Mart. $20 bucks a pop.

The difference between 26x1.38's and 26x1.75's may not sound like much on paper, but in practice, wow!

Gone is my nimble slingshot. In it's place is a thing that corners like an English double decker bus. I can't keep up with granny on her one speed schwinn, even when she is carrying my groceries.

Plus the whole house smells like rubber. But I refuse to store it in the garage.

I do have a sound theory though. I ran 40 pounds of air in both during my three mile test ride. (The minimum marked on the sidewall) Gonna crank 'em up to 60 next time. That should help compensate for my 45 year old 200 pound something girth.

One neat thing is their agressive tread. It looks like they could chew up carpet tacks and spit them out. Not a bad thing in this town.
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#17
Eric;

I have one of those tires on the front of my GT; and had them on another bike that I sold. Good long lasting tires; for my piece of mind commuting, I also use thorn resistant tubes and tire liners.

On the previous bike, I ran them at 70psi - really roll nice, and handle well, the trade off being a bit harsh a ride.
Nigel
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#18
Crumbs, while I was at Wal Mart- picked up a "self sealing" tube. Sounded great.

Then, got it home, and by goodness, it featured a Presta valve.

IMO, those things should be illegal in this country.

Dangit, Wal Mart Customer Service, here I come.
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#19
Hey thanks Nigel!

Should also note, those old crummy tires really needed to be replaced. They were a safety issue.

Interesting how a simple change of tires can change the whole personality of a bike.

Didn't I see a old French ten speed for sale down the block?
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#20
Those self-sealing tubes are WORTHLESS !!

It will get you an extra 10 feet, before you are walking, and put a goey mess over everything as it spurts out if you have a puncture.

Worse, it gums up the valve - instructions say to remove and clean the valve. Guess what happens when you have 50 psi in a tire, and want to go to 60 psi, and the valve is gummed up, so you have to remove - wear goggles, face and clothing protection, and do it away from anything you care about.

Never again for me.

Presta valves - I like them a LOT, especially for over 100 psi.
Nigel
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