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Replacing Fork on 2001 Diamondback Sorrento
#1
Hello,

I am new to mountain biking I recently purchased a used 2001 Diamondback Sorrento. When I use the front brakes the bike rattles a bit im not sure if it is a problem with the fork?? The fork looks a bit worn I am looking to replace it but I am not sure what model or make would be a suitable replacement. If somebody has any information please help. Thank you
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#2
Not knowing what you have exactly for a fork right now and the rattle is the fork you say. some low end forks were just a spring inside a tube and had no dampening and would rattle quite a bit. but first make sure your brake bolts are tight at the posts. Then make sure your headset is tight and no cocking when you squeeze the front brake and rock the bike back and forth.
If you decide to try a fork replacement on your own you will need to buy some tools or make some to get the job done. A suitable replacement will be the best one you can afford, and your lbs can offer assist on that.
If it were my bike I would go with a rigid fork over a low-end shock. steerer tubes are better cut with a saw guide.there can be hidden costs involved like a new headset also. this could be a good time to go threadless also but you may need new stem, headset also
the least expensive way to deal with it would be to stay with what you have but with a rigid fork.
post some pics and lets see what you have
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#3
[attachment=3337][attachment=3338][attachment=3339]
(07-17-2012, 10:56 PM)painkiller Wrote:  Not knowing what you have exactly for a fork right now and the rattle is the fork you say. some low end forks were just a spring inside a tube and had no dampening and would rattle quite a bit. but first make sure your brake bolts are tight at the posts. Then make sure your headset is tight and no cocking when you squeeze the front brake and rock the bike back and forth.
If you decide to try a fork replacement on your own you will need to buy some tools or make some to get the job done. A suitable replacement will be the best one you can afford, and your lbs can offer assist on that.
If it were my bike I would go with a rigid fork over a low-end shock. steerer tubes are better cut with a saw guide.there can be hidden costs involved like a new headset also. this could be a good time to go threadless also but you may need new stem, headset also
the least expensive way to deal with it would be to stay with what you have but with a rigid fork.
post some pics and lets see what you have

Hello,

Thank you for the response i will try your suggestion regarding the brakes and headset. I am attaching a few pics of the fork and the bike. Please let me know if you have any more info once you look at the pics
(07-18-2012, 03:42 AM)frank1283 Wrote:  
(07-17-2012, 10:56 PM)painkiller Wrote:  Not knowing what you have exactly for a fork right now and the rattle is the fork you say. some low end forks were just a spring inside a tube and had no dampening and would rattle quite a bit. but first make sure your brake bolts are tight at the posts. Then make sure your headset is tight and no cocking when you squeeze the front brake and rock the bike back and forth.
If you decide to try a fork replacement on your own you will need to buy some tools or make some to get the job done. A suitable replacement will be the best one you can afford, and your lbs can offer assist on that.
If it were my bike I would go with a rigid fork over a low-end shock. steerer tubes are better cut with a saw guide.there can be hidden costs involved like a new headset also. this could be a good time to go threadless also but you may need new stem, headset also
the least expensive way to deal with it would be to stay with what you have but with a rigid fork.
post some pics and lets see what you have

Hello,

Thank you for the response i will try your suggestion regarding the brakes and headset. I am attaching a few pics of the fork and the bike. Please let me know if you have any more info once you look at the pics
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#4
http://www.bikepedia.com/quickbike/BikeSpecs.aspx?Year=2001&Brand=Diamondback&Model=Sorrento%20Sport&Type=bike#.UAcNeaPNnsk

you have a 1 1/8" threaded headset; most but not all replacement forks today are threadless - meaning you'll need a need headset and stem - figure another $50- to $100- above the price of the fork.

What is your budget; and we can supply some specific suggestions.
Nigel
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#5
(07-18-2012, 07:29 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  http://www.bikepedia.com/quickbike/BikeSpecs.aspx?Year=2001&Brand=Diamondback&Model=Sorrento%20Sport&Type=bike#.UAcNeaPNnsk

you have a 1 1/8" threaded headset; most but not all replacement forks today are threadless - meaning you'll need a need headset and stem - figure another $50- to $100- above the price of the fork.

What is your budget; and we can supply some specific suggestions.

Thank you for the link. My budget at the moment would be $200.00 i have looked at a few forks at about $80 to $120.00. I found some that are threaded would i be able to use the same headset for the replacement fork?? The other question is a rigid fork a better suited replacement? I plan on riding on a few trails but nothing extreme at the moment. In the future as i ger more fimiliar with riding trails i eventually plan on purchasing a more advance bike for harder trails.
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#6
I agree with PK, and would go with a rigid fork - suspension is heavy and absorbs power.

If your headset is in good shape, you can probably get away with just replacing the balls and re-greasing. If the bearing races are pitted or damaged, you'll need a new headset anyway, and threadless is the way to go if replacement is needed.
Nigel
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#7
(07-18-2012, 08:55 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  I agree with PK, and would go with a rigid fork - suspension is heavy and absorbs power.

If your headset is in good shape, you can probably get away with just replacing the balls and re-greasing. If the bearing races are pitted or damaged, you'll need a new headset anyway, and threadless is the way to go if replacement is needed.

Thank you. Do you have any suggestions of what rigid fork would be a good replacement with the budget I mentioned above??
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#8
check these out
http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-MOSSO-Aluminum-Rigid-Straight-Bicycle-MTB-Fork-26-/260764590229
They come in white and black, and offer a carbon one also,
would require a new headset, stem, possible grips if you ruin them
I have thought about one for myself because they look nice a are fairly inexpensive. you should be in your price range with this choice if you shop wise for the other parts. do some more research and let us know. going carbon or aluminum rigid will knock a pound or two off the bike too
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#9
this fork may better suit your headtube and standard headset, the Mosso would be better suited for an internal style cartridge bearing headset
http://www.ebay.com/itm/RIGID-STRAIGHT-MTB-MOUNTAIN-BIKE-FORK-BLACK-1-1-8-26-in-/110864684371?pt=Cycling_Parts_Accessories&hash=item19d00cd553#ht_746wt_952

== DO NOT BUY THE MOSSO FOR YOUR APPLICATION ==
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#10
(07-19-2012, 04:43 PM)painkiller Wrote:  this fork may better suit your headtube and standard headset, the Mosso would be better suited for an internal style cartridge bearing headset
http://www.ebay.com/itm/RIGID-STRAIGHT-MTB-MOUNTAIN-BIKE-FORK-BLACK-1-1-8-26-in-/110864684371?pt=Cycling_Parts_Accessories&hash=item19d00cd553#ht_746wt_952

== DO NOT BUY THE MOSSO FOR YOUR APPLICATION ==

Thank you, i will look into it. I will post any updates or if i find something else i will post for advice.
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#11
Hi PK;

They both are 1¼" threadless; the second one is suspension corrected, I saw nothing in the description about that for the MOSSO. Other than one being aluminum alloy and the 2nd being Cro-Mo and the cost delta, why not the MOSSO?

I must be missing something.

Thank you
Nigel
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#12
Lets back up a bit, the new headtubes can be tapered, bigger at the top and bottom than in the middle,this means the bearing races are internal and flush with the headtube. The base of the mosso fork is larger like the flared headtube using the internal cartridge bearing and i could not guarantee compatibility of the mosso fork with the straight headtube. the external races may rub and not seat on the large area of the fork. that is why I back pedaled a bit after I had posted the mosso because of miss leading info and did not want to give wrong information. I will try to post pics of the two types to better show what I mean
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#13
thank you - I am learning Smile So far none of my bikes has threadless headset - note that my newest is 1994 vintage Trek T50 with a 1¼" (yes it is BIG) threaded headset.
Nigel
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