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Can I spread this frame??
#1
This 7 speed cruiser has 126mm rear drop-outs. Can I cold set or spread it somehow to 130mm? I think I saw somewhere that it's a no-no on these cheap frames with the big lugs welded to the flattened chain-stay tabs. By the way, this frame is STIFF. You can hardly spread the drop-outs by hand.

[Image: DSC00991.jpg]


Here's the inside of the drive side with the RD hanger.

[Image: DSC00988.jpg]


Here's the rear end. Yep, I use Kool Stop Salmons on my funky cruiser.

[Image: DSC00990.jpg]


The cruiser is 315lbs loaded, I keep breaking rear wheels/spokes, & I can't find a decent rear 126mm hub/wide 559mm rim/36spoke wheel. If I could find one I could probably bribe someone to properly stress relieve it. As it is, I get about 3-4 months on a wheel. I was hoping to go to a 130 hub & replace the QR with a solid axle, then have an excellent builder like P. White put a massive rim like a Velocity Psycho or Cliffhanger on it. Then hopefully get a few years of use out of it.
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#2
I have done similar frames like that with good luck. I use threaded rod with nuts and flat washers. slip in your dropouts spin the nuts finger tight, then slowly tighten the nuts against the washers and gently spread till you get what you want. loosen and measure often so you do not over do it. you will not feel much torque on the wrench but you spreading with major force.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#3
Here you go: http://sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing.html
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#4
I would not try to spread a frame with the way the dropouts are welded to the tubes.

One of the frames that I broke - totally unmodified - looked like that. It will break about ½" to 1" away from the dropouts.

Given the cost of things - especially a visit to ER or a clinic for stitches - get a different frame that will work for you; new, take a look at Nashbar, and there is always CL and ebay.
Nigel
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#5
It needs bending just 2mm each side, it'll be fine.

If you don't bend it, you've got a useless frame, if you try and bend it and it breaks, you've got a useless frame, so nothing to lose really. Smile
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#6
Not to disrespect sheldon, lots of useful info. The 2x4 method I never liked. I developed the threaded rod technique to push years ago and have had no problems and is much more precise with more control. Its like the homemade cup and race press but instead pushing. It seems the poster cannot use the frame the way he wants so if it breaks it was still worth the shot.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#7
Jef - I'm with the others. Not that it can't be done, it's just a risk.
Those stamped dropouts are more likely to bend before you ever get an appreciable amount of spread from the stays.

Edit - Look at the weep-holes in the 2nd pic. You've got some cancer in there eating away and weakening the stays already. Up to you, bro.

Rob
Wheelies don't pop themselves. (from a QBP fortune cookie)
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#8
The way that Sheldon shows, is more like the way a frame builder would do it, it's called cold setting, and can be used to correct or repair bent steel frames, provided they're not too bent.

If you look at the illustrations on Sheldon's site, you'll see that the bend is not concentrated on the drop-outs, but on the seat and chain stay tubes near the rear drop-out, so no stress on the welding/brazing of the rear drop out.
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#9
I appreciate the input. It is frustrating. I suppose I can try to find a NOS 126mm hub & have a strong wheel built on it.
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#10
(07-31-2012, 06:29 AM)1FJEF Wrote:  I appreciate the input. It is frustrating. I suppose I can try to find a NOS 126mm hub & have a strong wheel built on it.

Peter White has a few left.

Look for: Seven Speed Shimano 105 SC (almost) Wheelsets
on this page:
http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/Wheels.asp

Peter will sell the hubs separately.
Nigel
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#11
Thanks Nigel, I had seen that, & would have been all over it, but I asked him last friday about doing a 126mm rear to handle my weight & he said he didn't have anything, so he's either out of them, or thinks the old 105 hubs unsuitable for the 320lb+ cruiser. I have a bike with old 105 stuff on it & I think it was more of a bargain entry level racer stuff.
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#12
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Shimano-Dura-Ace-R-Hub126mm-36H-7-Speed-NOS-NEW-Vintage-/221086770500?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3379cc6544

I don't know this seller.

You did not say if it has to be cassette (aka freehub); or you would consider a freewheel. There are lots of 126mm freewheel choices, from very inexpensive to rather expensive.

I agree with not going to 32H - all of mine are 36 or 40.
Nigel
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#13
I have new 7 speed cassettes & freewheels so either would work. You're good at finding stuff.
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#14
If you are okay with a freewheel - take a look at wheels on Amazon - cheap, but need trueing, tensioning and stress relieving. And many need a spoke replacement as well......

The wheels on my World Tourist now were cheap Amazon (wheelmaster I believe), spokes replaced with Wheelsmith, SS14 except for the driveside rear which are DH13. Bearings clean, re-lubed and bearing preload adjusted so that the spin easily - bare wheel oscillates eventually settling down with the valve stem on top. Consider these as a rim and a hub for budget purposes.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=lp_3404731_nr_n_30?rh=n%3A3375251%2Cn%3A%213375301%2Cn%3A2232464011%2Cn%3A34​03201%2Cn%3A3404731%2Cn%3A3405001&bbn=3404731&ie=UTF8&qid=1343795568&rnid=3404731#/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=node%3D3405001&field-keywords=rear+126&rh=n%3A3375251%2Cn%3A%213375301%2Cn%3A2232464011%2Cn%3A3403201%2Cn%3A3404731%2Cn​%3A3405001%2Ck%3Arear+126
Nigel
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