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Need to replace a 5 speed freewheel
#1
After 35 years the Atomic 5 spd freewheel is showing wear. This is a custom (but vintage) road bike; Campy Record hubs, rear derailleur, Dura-ace front, Sugino Mighty Competition crankset. The dropout spacing is 120mm. Are there any replacements beside a Falcon?
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#2
A quick search on Google turned up several: http://www.google.co.uk/#q=5+spd+freewheel&hl=en&newwindow=1&safe=off&prmd=imvns&source=univ&tbm=shop&tbo=u&sa=X&ei=038-UN2lCoST0QW92YDIBg&ved=0CCsQrQQ&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&fp=98b12c10934d7a5a&biw=1588&bih=1061

Sadly, once components are superceded by newer models manufacturers seem to drop them from their better quality groupsets, leaving only the cheaper, lower quality versions.
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#3
I have worked on The 6spd model falcon freewheel which was quite a task to remove
If memory serves. Don't think the Atomic has ever crossed my shop? The falcon was a real challenge to play with but not knowing how to remove it was fun. The components are not really hard just takes a little time. I will try to find some posts to see if I can assist ya.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#4
(08-29-2012, 08:47 PM)xerxes Wrote:  A quick search on Google turned up several: http://www.google.co.uk/#q=5+spd+freewheel&hl=en&newwindow=1&safe=off&prmd=imvns&source=univ&tbm=shop&tbo=u&sa=X&ei=038-UN2lCoST0QW92YDIBg&ved=0CCsQrQQ&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&fp=98b12c10934d7a5a&biw=1588&bih=1061

Sadly, once components are superceded by newer models manufacturers seem to drop them from their better quality groupsets, leaving only the cheaper, lower quality versions.

Xerxes, thank you for the link. I should have included in my original ost that I'm in the States. A search on Google.US turned up less makes-models; none road bike quality. So, plan 2... search for NOS freewheel. Know anyone with a retired Dura-ace or Campy free wheel?
(08-30-2012, 11:21 AM)Bill Wrote:  I have worked on The 6spd model falcon freewheel which was quite a task to remove
If memory serves. Don't think the Atomic has ever crossed my shop? The falcon was a real challenge to play with but not knowing how to remove it was fun. The components are not really hard just takes a little time. I will try to find some posts to see if I can assist ya.

Bill, thanks for the reply. Are you saying that the Falcon freewheels are sustainable, with pieces and parts available from the maker or that they can just be maintained (disassembled & re-lubed)?
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#5
My apologies for being vague. I was only saying that taking them off the wheel was kind of a pain because there was no reference at the time of removal. For example which tool to use Wink. That's all. My above statement was to let you know I am researching my older posts to possibly help you along with some links or something. My brain remembers many things but not all. Lol.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#6
I mentioned Plan 2 to Xerxes... I'll search for a NOS or retired road bike/race quality 5 spd freewheel.

My plan 3 is to convert my new fixie frame into a road bike and finance the build by selling my vintage components.

When I built my 1st road bike there were Campy, Phil Wood with Dura-ace being "the new kid on the block" components to choose from... now there's so many brands my head swims.

Any recommendations as to who's/which hubs, rims, derailleurs, cassette-chain-rings, brakes to choose (I intend to keep the Scram TruVativ crankset)?
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#7
(08-30-2012, 12:41 PM)mikes105 Wrote:  When I built my 1st road bike there were Campy, Phil Wood with Dura-ace being "the new kid on the block" components to choose from... now there's so many brands my head swims.

The "big 3" for road are Campagnolo, Shimano and SRAM. These 3 make full groupsets including chains, cassettes, chainsets and bottom brackets then there dozens of different brands that make handlebars, stems, seatposts headsets etc. as well as "boutique" brands like Chris King, Hope, Royce and Phil Woods that make limited range of expensive (overpriced?) components.

The problem is, 5 speed freewheels are now 40 years out of date and the "big 3" are now at 11 speed cassettes and have dropped older 5, 6, 7 and 8 speed freewheels and cassettes from their higher end component ranges, with only 9, 10 and 11 speeds available in their better quality groupsets.

I have this problem with my 1990 7 speed MTB, Shimano no longer produce the better quality Deore HG70 cassette and you can only find the heavier and less pretty HG20, 30, 40 and 50 models. They are all perfectly adequate, but the bike was a fairly top of the range model in with nice components in it's day and it's a shame to fit lower quality parts because that's all that's available.
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#8
Your bikes are really nice, classic. I think it would be a shame to "newgrade" them. Plus this is really expensive (and great fun - not) because of the many different standards. Rear frame triangle needs to be cold set (maybe even the fork, which I personally would be afraid to...), a full group and wheelset costs big money plus you might run into problems with the bottom bracket (French or Swiss BB threads anyone?) among other things (eg. with Mafac Competition brakes with soldered on brake bosses). So, while it can be worthwhile to replace the parts with new stuff if you like the way those old steel steeds ride, it is a real time and money sink. Just be aware of that. I don't want to keep you from doing that, I'm just considering my experience with my old bike.

Oh, and looking at your saddles: Is the frame too short for you (so that you slip backwards all the time)? Or should you probably try to find a seat fitting your seatbones? A good saddle makes a big difference!
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#9
Would this stuff fit on your hub?
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#10
http://www.interlocracing.com/freewheels_steel.html

IRD has 5 speed freewheels with the latest HG tooth profiles for improved shifting.
Nigel
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#11
Hey guys, thanks for all the advice. Xerxes, the info' of components now being sold in groupsets was very influential to my plans. Joe_W, your economic advice has also weighed heavily. 1FJEF & nfmisso, thank you for the links to IRD.

That's the new "plan". Rebuild the drivetrain with a IRD 5spd freewheel (13X28 model), new Sugino chainrings (130mmX42 inner, 52T outer) and a new chain (1/2X3/32).

Joe_W, you commented on my saddles. No, the frames fit me well. The down-turned horn position is from two factors. First when I learned to ride roadbike, I was taught to balance on the pedals with my center of mass/gravity centered over the bottom bracket. This lets the frame pivot over humps & bumps in the road and saves the delicate rims from damage. It also positions the legs for maximum power, especially when your hands are on the drop of the bars. In this riding posture, the saddle is used as fulcrum; you push against it rather than sit on it. Second, the forward tilt protects that delicate area immediately behind the scrotum. There's a lot of nerves and blood vessels there that don't respond well to constant pressure.
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#12
(09-01-2012, 11:47 AM)mikes105 Wrote:  ....

That's the new "plan". Rebuild the drivetrain with a IRD 5spd freewheel (13X28 model), new Sugino chainrings (130mmX42 inner, 52T outer) and a new chain (1/2X3/32).

....

Unless you have some serious hills, I would suggest the 13-24 version. 42-24 is enough for shorter hills for most people. 42-28 is low enough for climbing cork screw pedestrian over passes. The closer ratio gears are nice for reduced shock on the knees. I have a 13-23 7 speed cassette on my SR which I use for commuting with a 52-39 combination up front.

Standard disclaimer - your mileage may vary.
Nigel
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#13
nfmisso, thanks for the insights on freewheel cogs. At 60 the legs aren't what they once were. For ten years I comfortably climbed the canyons around Austin, TX with a 14-24 X 42-52 set up. But that was 25 years ago. Now I live in the piedmont region of NC; this too is a topography of hills and creeks. While most of the time I cruise in 18X42 there's times like last week when I climbed about a quarter mile from a dead start in a creek bottom. When I got to the crest I was down to 24X42, huffin' & puffin' and wishing I had lower gears.

My single speed is set up 18X48 and I'm actively seeking a 42T or 44T chainring for it too. Anyone know if the Scram/TruVativ inner or middle rings will bolt directly to my TruVativ Touro model crankset? It came new with a 48T Powerglide outer. Adding to my confusion, the 42T Powerglide ring is described as middle ring for 3X cranksets and compatible with 9-10 spd chain. Will it work with my 1/2X3/32 chain or is there something different about 9-10 spd chains? I see descriptions for other rings like Surly that just give the alloy and BCD. I guess it comes down to the question, "are all 5-hole 130mm BCD rings compatible with all 5-spoke, 130mm BCD cranks"?
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#14
(09-02-2012, 12:57 PM)mikes105 Wrote:  ....... I guess it comes down to the question, "are all 5-hole 130mm BCD rings compatible with all 5-spoke, 130mm BCD cranks"?

More or less yes. A chainring for 3/32" will work ok with 1/8", but not the other way around. The higher the number of speeds, the closer the chain rings are place together, but there is no change the tooth profile.

For you SS, you can use any 3/32 chain ring that will bolt up

The triple on our T50 has chainrings from three different manufacturers: 26T RaceFace, 44T Rocket and 54T TA. My SR has a very lowend Shimano crankset with Truvati rings.
Nigel
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