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Pre ride meal
#21
great job Eric! keep on keepin on
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#22
Thanks PK. Goodness, it's so much fun, riding in a competitive thing. What's really fun? Comparing hardware. Ol' Ross whooped butt today!
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#23
Hey Eric, I'm late to the game but still: congrats!
My race day breakfast is: croissant with cream cheese and jam and black tea, or maybe toast with jam or honey. I (well, my stomach) do not like too much fat in the morning before the race.
Then, not later than 90min before the start: some dry cake and a small cup of coffee without milk.

I have problems with dairy products when racing, so I now keep away of them. The astronaut type food (gels and stuff) are not really necessary for me when racing olympic distance triathlons or shorter (I just found out...). I guess my body has enough reserves stored away. Water is paramount, as is salt (for me, as I do sweat a lot when racing). I tried several types of gels (Hammer, GU, PowerBar) they are ok. First use them in training to see what you can eat. I also tried bars (bake them myself), they are ok for relaxed training rides but my stomach does not like solids when under extreme stress.

The night before is usually something with lots of carbs: rice, potatoes, pizza, pasta, whatever I like, and beer or red wine. Almost as important is the week before (if you really want to do this the pro way), as you first have to create demand for carbs by eating a low (or even no carb) diet the up to the last three days and then do the loading. You have to train your body to actually do that really well, so for guys like us it does not really make a difference... (I race triathlons, just not very well: top third swim, average bike, really poor run).

Another important thing for me is to get enough sleep the nights before the race. The last night was usually not that great when doing the first races, now I'm better. But still: I usually have to get up really early to drive to the race venue...
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#24
Great point. It was tough getting sleep because of jitters. Kept thinking about all possibilities. Water too. Just past the halfway point I fumbled my bottle. Didn't go back for it- man alive but I was thirsty at the end!
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#25
Yeah, a good nutrition plan won't help if you lose the food (or the water) on the way or if you have not slept well. So for a Sunday race I go to bed early on Friday (+ no booze that evening) and sleep long on Saturday. On Saturday evening I usually enjoy a nice meal, with a glass of good red wine or a beer (or two). The hopf (don't know the English term...) in the beer is a weak sedative, too... I guess it boils down to getting used to pre-race stress. I only do races once per month in summer, so I'm not too experienced. I know how it is to lie awake and think about if you have packed everything or what about mechanical problems or whatever...
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#26
mmmm... Carbo-loading!
Does anyone remember a '90s T-shirt company called J Rag that sold bicycle themed T's in earth tones? One of my fave was olive green and had a pic of a T Rex chowing down on a carbon fibre bike with splinters flying. The caption was Carbo Loading. Those were the days!

Rock on, Eric. Proud of you! Can I offer you a mug of Jittery Joes fire-roasted bean coffee to settle your nerves? Wink
Wheelies don't pop themselves. (from a QBP fortune cookie)
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#27
Don't forget mid ride refreshment.

Depending on ambient temperature and mood, I choose one of these:

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[Image: lager-glass.jpg]

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