Bicycle TutorBicycle Tutor

Show off your bike!

Related video tutorials:
Need to replace bent stem. What is my size?
#1
Hello everyone!

I bought a used bike online, and when it arrived, the first thing I noticed was that the handlebar was crooked. The right side of bar was higher than the left. Turns out the stem was bent out of shape.

I'd think it would require quite some force to make the stem bend, but anyways that's not the issue.

I've removed the stem (with lots of sweat and blood). It's a threaded stem, and it was very rusted and stuck inside the headtube.

There are words and numbers inscribed on it, and it says:
MIN. INSERT 22.2
95 J

[attachment=3505]

I'd like to get a stem that has a replaceable face-plate, but it looks like most of them are for threadless headsets. I found out that I could get a quill to threadless adapter, but I'm not sure what size I need to buy. If anyone can tell me how I should measure this thing, I'd really appreciate it.

Lastly, I noticed that the inside of the headtube is also pretty rusty. If/when I get the adapter, do I need to do some kind of de-rusting before I stick it in there? Or can I just put a new stem into a rusty tube?

Thanks in advance,
Lee
Reply
#2
22.2 indicates that it's a 1 inch quill stem. 22.2mm is the internal diameter of a 1 inch (25.4mm) outer diameter stearer tube.

So, you either need a 1" quill stemm or 1" quill stem adapter to use with an A-head style stem.

Before you fit the new stem, you could try and clean any lose rust from the inside of the steerer tube with a wire brush, if you can get one to fit, or perhaps an old scouring pad poked through with a screwdriver or something. After you've cleaned it, try and smear some grease inside the steerer tube to help prevent it rusting further. Also put some grease on the new quill stem to stop it siezing again.
Reply
#3
(09-13-2012, 03:44 PM)xerxes Wrote:  22.2 indicates that it's a 1 inch quill stem. 22.2mm is the internal diameter of a 1 inch (25.4mm) outer diameter stearer tube.

So, you either need a 1" quill stemm or 1" quill stem adapter to use with an A-head style stem.

Before you fit the new stem, you could try and clean any lose rust from the inside of the steerer tube with a wire brush, if you can get one to fit, or perhaps an old scouring pad poked through with a screwdriver or something. After you've cleaned it, try and smear some grease inside the steerer tube to help prevent it rusting further. Also put some grease on the new quill stem to stop it siezing again.

Thanks xerxes! Do I need to worry about the new quill stem / quill stem adapter having the same min insertion length as this one?
Reply
#4
Quote:Thanks xerxes! Do I need to worry about the new quill stem / quill stem adapter having the same min insertion length as this one?

No. If you want to have the handlebars raised high, you should chose one with a long insert, but if you want it fully inserted, you obviously don't want it longer than the steerer tube on the forks, or it will stick out the bottom. Smile
Reply
#5
(09-13-2012, 03:44 PM)xerxes Wrote:  Also put some grease on the new quill stem to stop it siezing again.
Man, xerxes, I wish I could get my damn seat post to sieze! Yeah, I know, shut up & lose some weight.
Reply
#6
Quote:Man, xerxes, I wish I could get my damn seat post to sieze! Yeah, I know, shut up & lose some weight.

Are you sure it's the right size? They come in 0.2mm size increments and one a size too small might seem to fit properly, but slip. You could also try making a shim out of beer/drinks can.
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  When to replace handlebar and stem dave_sd 4 9,051 04-19-2011, 12:35 AM
Last Post: RobAR
  Properly Identify Stem Size AlanK 5 14,207 03-29-2011, 02:24 PM
Last Post: AlanK

Forum Jump:



ISSN 1918-3445 © Copyright 2007-2010 Bicycle Tutor / Privacy Policy / Created by Alex Ramon

feed