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Trek shift 2 or Specialized Expedition sport
#1
My wife and I narrowed it down to 2 bikes for leisure and comfort riding....
trek shift 2 or the expedition sport. Can anyone out there through experience steer us in the right direction in terms of pros and cons on each bike. Someone had told us that we should get an expedition basic model (not the sport model) because the seat suspension on the trek shift 2 and expedition sport will eventually loosen up and the seat will move slightly laterally as you ride.

PLEASE HELP!!!!! WE ARE STUCK!!!!!!
Any help would be appreciated.....thank you
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#2
They are very comparable bikes with no major differences, both look good and you should be happy with them. But since you have to decide...
- Are they from the same shop? If not, I'd go with the shop you like better, that will make a bigger difference than the bike.
- The specs are slightly vague, I can't tell if they have "freewheels" or "cassettes" in the back (probably freewheels). But a cassette is better, if one has that, it could be a factor.
- The Specialized lists "stainless" spokes. If the Trek's aren't stainless, that's a strike against it.
- Performance wise, the biggest difference will be in shifters and brakes. The parts are "comparable" but not identical. Test ride and see if one shifts/brakes better than the other.
- It sounds like the Spec's tires have a puncture resistant liner, I can't tell on the Trek. Lined tires are preferable (though not a huge deal).
- I wouldn't downgrade just to get a solid seatpost, but those suspension posts do get loose over time. Ask the shop if they'll swap it out for you at no charge (a solid post is technically a cheaper item than the suspension one, so they may be willing.). Or just wait and buy a new post in the future, it's a $15 - $20 part.

Get a rack and basket or saddlebag. You'd be surprised how much more pleasant and practical the bike is if there's a place to carry stuff. (And don't make your wife put the rack on hers because you don't want to look dorky Smile

If you're going to be locking the bikes at all, ask the shop to swap the quick release on the seat post for a normal bolt. A bolt's not theft proof, but it will stop some annoying teenager from swiping your seat because they can.

good luck!
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#3
buy one of each.

Most of us on this forum are interested in building and repairing bikes; very few of us have much experience with new fully assembled bikes.

All seat post suspension systems loosen up; the Thudbuster is best:
http://www.amazon.com/Cane-Creek-Thudbuster-Travel-Seatpost/dp/B000T3BYH6/ref=sr_1_1?s=cycling&ie=UTF8&qid=1350664297&sr=1-1&keywords=thudbuster

The others move around a LOT. I tried one for a few months, and went back to rigid. My wife tried one for awhile on the back our tandem, and did not like it; even with the rough roads around here.

Most of us here also do not like any form of suspension on our street bikes. I admit to have built up a bike to try front suspension, and since built and ridden a little bit, I have purchased a rigid fork for it.

You may have better luck/information from: http://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php
Nigel
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#4
Thanks Dave for the reply. With so much to consider, this will help us decide which bike to be a better choice for us. We're making our way to the bike shop now. I'll make sure the basket/rack goes on my husbands bike haha. Thanks again for all the great tips
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#5
Well, it's probably too late, but I ride a Specialized Expedition Elite so here it goes.
How much do you weigh? I break 260 & It's a bit much for my Expedition, & the new ones only have 32 spokes, I don't care that they're double wall, my experience has been 36 spokes are better (the Shift2 & Verve2 have 36).

If you aren't too heavy & you want a quicker feel the Trek Verve2 has 36 spokes & 700C x 35mm tires instead of the plumper tires 26" on the the Shift2 & Expedition. The Expedition has 32 spoke wheels.

I believe the Trek uses Freewheels, not cassettes as listed, same for the Specialized. I think the TZ-31 cassette listed is actually available as a freewheel only, others may know better. My old Expedition came with a 7 speed cassette.

I prefer Specialized's customer service, you can actually call them & I have found them friendly & helpful, Trek has been the opposite.

Don't worry about the suspension seat post, ride it for a few years & replace it when it quits. Mine has started to turn as you pedal & doesn't bother me actually.

I compared a similar bike to mine without front suspension and exactly the same tires. I much preferred the suspension, it really smoothed out vibration, rattle & shake from little irregularities & bumps in the road & sidewalk.
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#6
(10-20-2012, 07:27 AM)1FJEF Wrote:  Well, it's probably too late, but I ride a Specialized Expedition Elite so here it goes.
How much do you weigh? I break 260 & It's a bit much for my Expedition, & the new ones only have 32 spokes, I don't care that they're double wall, my experience has been 36 spokes are better (the Shift2 & Verve2 have 36).

If you aren't too heavy & you want a quicker feel the Trek Verve2 has 36 spokes & 700C x 35mm tires instead of the plumper tires 26" on the the Shift2 & Expedition. The Expedition has 32 spoke wheels.

I believe the Trek uses Freewheels, not cassettes as listed, same for the Specialized. I think the TZ-31 cassette listed is actually available as a freewheel only, others may know better. My old Expedition came with a 7 speed cassette.

I prefer Specialized's customer service, you can actually call them & I have found them friendly & helpful, Trek has been the opposite.

Don't worry about the suspension seat post, ride it for a few years & replace it when it quits. Mine has started to turn as you pedal & doesn't bother me actually.

I compared a similar bike to mine without front suspension and exactly the same tires. I much preferred the suspension, it really smoothed out vibration, rattle & shake from little irregularities & bumps in the road & sidewalk.

Thanks for your information.....no it's not too late. Right now we are trying to figure out what size to go with. My husband is 5'9" 165 lbs and I'm 5'5" 120 lbs and the dealer is trying to fit my husband with a large and a medium for me. We wanted to find out how a medium for my husband and a small for me feels. So, we need to go back and test ride after he builds the bikes. Any suggestion on size of bikes we should go with?

Thank you!!
Re the specialized expedition sport......my husband is 5'9" 165 lbs and I am 5'5" 120 lbs. Any suggestions on what size bike we should go with?

Thank You
I'm sorry, but I'm new on this forum and not hitting the right button. I wanted to ask everyone what size would be recommended for the Specialized Expedition Sport. My husband is 5'9" 165 lbs and I am 5'5" 120 lbs.

Thanks
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#7
(10-20-2012, 02:20 PM)crownpaw Wrote:  ...........I'm sorry, but I'm new on this forum and not hitting the right button. I wanted to ask everyone what size would be recommended for the Specialized Expedition Sport. My husband is 5'9" 165 lbs and I am 5'5" 120 lbs.

Thanks

It is more a function of inseam and arm reach than hieght. My trousers are 30-31" inseam, and I like a 58cm (23") frame with the seat quite elevated so that my legs are almost straight at the bottom of the stroke.

Too many people (including some idiot sales people at bike shops) end up with bikes that are too small for them; which do not allow them to get thier legs almost straight, resulting in knee pain.
Nigel
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#8
(10-20-2012, 03:21 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  
(10-20-2012, 02:20 PM)crownpaw Wrote:  ...........I'm sorry, but I'm new on this forum and not hitting the right button. I wanted to ask everyone what size would be recommended for the Specialized Expedition Sport. My husband is 5'9" 165 lbs and I am 5'5" 120 lbs.

Thanks

It is more a function of inseam and arm reach than hieght. My trousers are 30-31" inseam, and I like a 58cm (23") frame with the seat quite elevated so that my legs are almost straight at the bottom of the stroke.

Too many people (including some idiot sales people at bike shops) end up with bikes that are too small for them; which do not allow them to get thier legs almost straight, resulting in knee pain.


Thank you for your response. On an expedition, they come in extra small, small, medium, large and extra large sizes. With your inseam of 30-31, which bike would fit you? My husband being about 5' 8 1/2" has an inseam of 30" (short legs). Which size bike do you think would be a better fit? This bike is for leisure, flat paths rides. I'm 5' 4 1/2" with 28" inseam.
Any suggestions will be very helpful.
Thanks
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#9
"extra small, small, medium, large and extra large sizes" are practically meaningless. Each manufacturer has thier own conversion to a measured size. You may be able to find that conversion on thier website.

You really have to ride them to be sure. Everyone is different.


When you get the bike, you should have the bike sized so that there is no more than 3" (75mm) out of the frame - you will want to move it higher (much higher) as your body limbers up with riding practice.
Nigel
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#10
My Medium Expedition is too small for my legs (30"inseam) but almost too long & low for me to reach the handlebars which I changed to alloy swept back (Sunlite North Road Style). A 5" rise version of the factory bars would have probably been OK too. I wish I had a large frame.
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[Image: DSC01105.jpg]
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No cable changes were required. Don't laugh, I actually wouldn't mind having a front basket!

Both of you are light enough to ride a bike with 32 spokes & 700C tires but for leisure riding on flat paths I think the 26" tires & smaller frame sizes are the way to go. nfmisso & others here including myself are not just leisure riding, and for us, we want more leg extension. It avoids knee pain with thousands of miles of riding & allows for more power & speed.
IMO you don't need tire liners, special tubes or goop in the tubes for flat protection given your intended use. Make sure you have a pump & air pressure gauge though. New riders forget, inner tubes leak, every other day check the tire pressure. Never ride below about 35psi with those tires & you'll stay out of trouble, at your weights you could ride with more pressure & still have some cushion.
Never let your bike sit on flat tires, if you don't ride much, hang the bikes up, out of direct sunlight.
Helmets!
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#11
Thanks everyone for all your help. We both ended up purchasing a 2013 Expedition, his in a size medium and I decided on a size small. We decided that at this time a 7 speed was enough for cruising. Also it meant less slack on the chain. Who knows, an upgrade may happen sooner than we think.
Yep, I'll have him get a basket and maybe a cup holder too.... Life is good
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#12
Those bikes will be great for cruisin' around. Remember the bike pump & helmets.
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#13
Hi Everyone,

Does anyone have any suggestions on a hitch that would properly fit on a Roadtrek motorhome (Chevy Expressvan 3500). It has a spare tire unit on the back left door. There is a 2" hitch receiver. I need a bike hitch carrier that will clear the spare tire and holds at least 2 (or 4) bikes. Been looking at the Thule apex swing 4 hitch rack#9027 or Yakima swing daddy 4 bike #2422. I' m thinking the 4 bike hitch will give me the clearance needed not to bang into the spare tire, swings out for access back right door. Also, we may carry more than 2 bikes. Will be carrying 2 Specialized Expedition bikes. Any info or suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
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#14
you can always get a hitch extender if clearance is a problem. Harbor Freight and Amazon have them.
Nigel
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