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Back wheel dragging
#1
Hi, new to the forum.

I have recently started cycling (nothing too serious) and began using my old mountain bike, after a while of using the bike, I noticed that my back wheel was dragging, and it was extremely hard to push the pedals, I just assumed it was because the bike was old, so I decided to buy a new one.

I bought the bike online, and I had to assemble it myself, the frame,back wheel, pedal arms, gear and chain came already assembled, I just had to put on the handlebars, pedals, seat and front wheel. I took the bike out yesterday (first time) and noticed that, as with my old bike, it was incredibly hard to push the pedals, I have no idea what it could be. I have noticed that some parts of the rim of the back wheel are rubbing on something, causing the paint to come off, and when I spin the back wheel, it comes to an abrupt stop, when it should just keep spinning..

I have included a video (as i'm useless at explaining), the gear and the plastic bit seems to be wobbling a bit, is this normal? thanks for reading and thanks for your help !

http://youtu.be/jAZ2L1luUXI
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#2
Hi Tom;

Your video is focusing on the wrong area - pull back so that we can see the rim and brake pads.

From the limited amount of time the rim is visible; it appears that the wheel needs to be trued - and most likely tensioned, stress relieved and re-trued. Then the brakes need to be adjusted.

While you are at; you should check the wheel bearings for grease.

Those spoke protectors (plastic disk thing) always look like that.
Nigel
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#3
(11-13-2012, 01:44 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  Hi Tom;

Your video is focusing on the wrong area - pull back so that we can see the rim and brake pads.

From the limited amount of time the rim is visible; it appears that the wheel needs to be trued - and most likely tensioned, stress relieved and re-trued. Then the brakes need to be adjusted.

While you are at; you should check the wheel bearings for grease.

Those spoke protectors (plastic disk thing) always look like that.

Thanks for the reply, as I mentioned before, the frame/back wheel and gears came as one 'unit', should this tuning/tensioning have been done by the guys I bought the bike from? I will go and take another video now. Thanks again

http://youtu.be/uKcegEcgxJ4
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#4
You need to open up the rear brakes as they are set too tight. Than spin the wheel and see if it has a wobble in it. If so do what Nigel suggests. Its also a good idea to make sure all bearings have grease.

If we had a photo of the brakes we could offer advice . If you have threaded adjusters turn them inwards to get more cable length. You can also move the pads outward, or you may also need to loosen the pinch bolt holding the cable at break and give it some more clack. Set the pads about 1/8 inch from rim.

Examine brakes carefully including the threaded collar at brake lever on handle bar to see where it can be adjusted.
Never Give Up!!!
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#5
(11-13-2012, 04:02 PM)TomB Wrote:  ....... should this tuning/tensioning have been done by the guys I bought the bike from? .......

This is why a bike bought at a shop is more - they do all of this for you. Mail order (and Wal-mart, Sams, Costco, etc) generally do not do this for you - unless you are spending over a $1000- on one bike, and even then, not always.

For example, Niagara Cylces has a specific warning that all mail order bikes are shipped, ready to be set up. The things that you are experiencing are things that are taken care of during the setup process.

Automobiles are the same way - dealer prep is required.

By choosing mail order; you have chosen to do the dealer prep yourself. Dealer prep at a decent shop in San Jose is about $100- retail.

Many of us on this forum have the skills and tools to handle the job, some of us purchase bikes mail order, most of us go for older bikes and components sourced on CL, eBay, garage sales, etc. to create the bicycles that suit us. The tools required to completely set up or rebuild a bike - using low-end tools - runs about $1000-

Bike shops have to recover their investments, pay salaries, rent, taxes, etc.
Nigel
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#6
Yep, 10-4 to what Nigel said. We had a fellow here working at walmart whose boss wanted him to build 40 bikes a day. Now you know how that works out. They just slap them together.

Perhaps there is a do it yourself bike shop in your area. We have rider wave here. Great place to learn and meet other bikers.
Never Give Up!!!
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#7
Quote:The tools required to completely set up or rebuild a bike - using low-end tools - runs about $1000

Blimey! Where are you buying your tools? I reckon about $200 for a fairly comprehensive set of tools excluding the "workshop" stuff like headset presses, wheel truing stands etc. which you won't get enough use out of to justify buying them, unless you're a real enthusiast, or own a workshop. Smile
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#8
Hey guys, thanks for the replies, I didn't think about it that way nfmisso! I have had further problems with the bike, the right hand peddle keeps falling off, and the front brake sometimes doesn't work. I bought it from a well known autocentre (halfords), but it was cheaper online than in-store, so I just ordered it from online, thinking it would be the same, guess I was wrong! they should take it back, right?

Thanks again for all your replies, very informative!
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#9
Well, would you buy a car from a bike shop? Sorry, but this is basically the same thing. In general those bikes can be set up to offer a decent ride (well, mostly) but are commonly referred to as BSOs (bike shaped objects) because of the really low end "frames" and components usually found on them.

A brake that sometimes does not work is really dangerous and this is (for me) a reason to either return it or ask for help. The question is how much time do you want to (or can) invest in the bike and if is this a limited resource. The other problem is whether you can do the stuff needed: truing and tensioning a wheel is not really difficult but needs a lot of patience (especially the first time). I am quite sure that also all of the bearings need to be greased etc., the dérailleur hanger is slightly bent, the brakes need to be adjusted (as well as the dérailleurs).

I guess Nigel is also referring to "the workshop stuff", tools like head set press and the tools to reface the bottom bracket etc. This can be costly really fast. Plus I guess that he is fond of high quality tools...
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#10
(11-14-2012, 02:32 PM)xerxes Wrote:  
Quote:The tools required to completely set up or rebuild a bike - using low-end tools - runs about $1000

Blimey! Where are you buying your tools? I reckon about $200 for a fairly comprehensive set of tools excluding the "workshop" stuff like headset presses, wheel truing stands etc. which you won't get enough use out of to justify buying them, unless you're a real enthusiast, or own a workshop. Smile
Hi Xerex;

"completely" = all; including headset press, truing stand (absolutely required for me), etc.

Not economically justifiable was my point - bike shops invest in all the tools; and have to make a return, which results in higher cost than mail order places that do not set up the bikes.
Nigel
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#11
Pssst... All the stuff I have $2,000 (includes supplies, materials to set the shop up, etc) and all the homemade goodies too! As said your looking at an addicted bike enthusiast Smile..
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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