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The New Family Member
#1
The Bianchi
[attachment=3787]
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#2
there goes another that slipped through my fingers somehow!
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#3
This bike has 700x25c tires and I was wondering whats the difference between 700x28 700x25 and 700x23 and which is better?.
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#4
which is better for you is what you mean I think, only you can answer that. One really is not better than the other as which would suit your needs better than the other. If you go with the 23s that would be more for race. less space between the pavement and rim that could translate to more flats and increased chance of rim damage caused by uneven concrete, pot holes etc... 25s would give a bit more meat to play with and still have the race feel and high pressure.
If you want more dependability and tread choices and ease of ownership and self repair then go for the 28s or 32s commonly found on touring or sport hybrids
everyone has an opinion on the brand and size they prefer and I have had good named tires that have crazed,cracked, and crapped out long before they should have in my opinion. So with that said, if you want race go with the 23s and 25s. and if you want good all arounders go with the 28s or 32s of your flavor and affordability.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#5
As PK says 28s or 32 - if they will fit.

The number (23/25/28/etc) refers to the nominal width and nominal height of the tire in millimeters. Most bicycle tires are the same width and height - in automotive tire terms they would be call 100 series tires. For example, if bicycle tires were designated in the same way as car tires, a 28-622 would be a: 28/100-622; where a car tire might be a 205/60-16 - the 16 being the bead seat diameter in inches; 205 being the maximum width of the tire in millimeter, and the height of the tire being 60% x 205 = 122.5mm

700c is a designation that once upon a time, in a land far far away related to some real dimension, now it is imaginary. The bead seat diameter for a 700c tire is 622mm. On the tire amongst the many other numbers, you will find something like 28-622; aka ISO or ERTRO size. These numbers are actually associated with measurable dimensions of the wheel and tire.

Bead seat diameter is the diameter in millimeters of the seating surface in the rim where the inner diameter of the tire touches. It is approximately the inner diameter of the tire.
Nigel
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#6
"The New Family Member". I thought somebody had a baby!
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#7
Very nice addition!

(12-06-2012, 03:47 AM)1FJEF Wrote:  "The New Family Member". I thought somebody had a baby!

Well they did... ummm kinda.. sorta..??? Wink To some bikes are their babies.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#8
(12-06-2012, 02:00 AM)painkiller Wrote:  which is better for you is what you mean I think, only you can answer that. One really is not better than the other as which would suit your needs better than the other. If you go with the 23s that would be more for race. less space between the pavement and rim that could translate to more flats and increased chance of rim damage caused by uneven concrete, pot holes etc... 25s would give a bit more meat to play with and still have the race feel and high pressure.
If you want more dependability and tread choices and ease of ownership and self repair then go for the 28s or 32s commonly found on touring or sport hybrids
everyone has an opinion on the brand and size they prefer and I have had good named tires that have crazed,cracked, and crapped out long before they should have in my opinion. So with that said, if you want race go with the 23s and 25s. and if you want good all arounders go with the 28s or 32s of your flavor and affordability.


Oh...I see....yeah...I think I am gonna go with somethin in between like the 25 ...thanks for the explanation...
(12-06-2012, 03:42 AM)nfmisso Wrote:  As PK says 28s or 32 - if they will fit.

The number (23/25/28/etc) refers to the nominal width and nominal height of the tire in millimeters. Most bicycle tires are the same width and height - in automotive tire terms they would be call 100 series tires. For example, if bicycle tires were designated in the same way as car tires, a 28-622 would be a: 28/100-622; where a car tire might be a 205/60-16 - the 16 being the bead seat diameter in inches; 205 being the maximum width of the tire in millimeter, and the height of the tire being 60% x 205 = 122.5mm

700c is a designation that once upon a time, in a land far far away related to some real dimension, now it is imaginary. The bead seat diameter for a 700c tire is 622mm. On the tire amongst the many other numbers, you will find something like 28-622; aka ISO or ERTRO size. These numbers are actually associated with measurable dimensions of the wheel and tire.

Bead seat diameter is the diameter in millimeters of the seating surface in the rim where the inner diameter of the tire touches. It is approximately the inner diameter of the tire.


I kinda understand even though it sounds pretty confusing. Smile
(12-06-2012, 03:47 AM)1FJEF Wrote:  "The New Family Member". I thought somebody had a baby!

She is the new addition 7 total bikes in the house...and she is gorgeous .
(12-06-2012, 03:55 AM)Bill Wrote:  Very nice addition!

(12-06-2012, 03:47 AM)1FJEF Wrote:  "The New Family Member". I thought somebody had a baby!

Well they did... ummm kinda.. sorta..??? Wink To some bikes are their babies.

Smile
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#9
Of the three bikes you were persuing, I think this one is the best of the lot. Good deal.
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#10
(12-06-2012, 08:41 PM)RBurrelli Wrote:  Of the three bikes you were persuing, I think this one is the best of the lot. Good deal.

Yeah..definitely!...She is a beauty...
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#11
She is going to the LBS today for an inspection. I was playing a bit with her last night on the indoor trainer only to check on the gears and it shifts beautifully but I "think" I might have to change the rear wheel...I notice that it wabbles a bit.. don't know if because the tires are pretty worned up that it looks that way but if thats the case is this repairable?..or if I need to get a new wheel I might as well get the pair

Should I get something like this ?....are the newer wheelsets compatible with this bike?... It has 7 speed cassette

http://www.ebay.com/itm/380464188423?_trksid=p5197.c0.m619#ht_5527wt_1161

Or should I stick with a pair of 36 spoke wheels like these ones

http://www.ebay.com/itm/330769126920?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649#ht_1138wt_1161

My son weights around 145lbs but I might be using it a bit too and even though I am still losing weight I am heavier than him and I ride kind of agressive. Besides this bike is not light..it is pretty heavy. So I am concern about durability on the wheels if I get new ones.

Any recommendations?
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#12
I would guess it is a 7 speed freewheel not a cassette, judging from the overall appearance of the bike (unless it had been upgraded). Then the frame will have 127mm (or so) spacing in the rear (distance between drop outs). New road bike stuff is 130mm. This should in general work, though the rear dérailleur hanger will have to be adjusted (do that anyway). I have had luck with bending open the rear triangle (cold setting) on two steel frames of which one is abused as a cyclocross bike.
In general, if the "wobbles" are not too bad the wheel can be trued. It might have to have some spokes replaced (when nipples have corroded in place), but that's no big deal. The Vuelta wheelsets seem to be ok, I'd say that the 32 spoke wheelset is probably more durable if it has been built properly, that is the spoke tension is high enough and evenly distributed around the wheel. Hard (read: impossible) to tell if that's the case without having the wheels in my hand.
Oh, and bike weight is neglegible when compared to rider weight. Many of us used think otherwise (I guess) but then looked at the numbers (well, I did). Lighter wheels will make a difference though.
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#13
(12-07-2012, 03:35 PM)Joe_W Wrote:  I would guess it is a 7 speed freewheel not a cassette, judging from the overall appearance of the bike (unless it had been upgraded). Then the frame will have 127mm (or so) spacing in the rear (distance between drop outs). New road bike stuff is 130mm. This should in general work, though the rear dérailleur hanger will have to be adjusted (do that anyway). I have had luck with bending open the rear triangle (cold setting) on two steel frames of which one is abused as a cyclocross bike.
In general, if the "wobbles" are not too bad the wheel can be trued. It might have to have some spokes replaced (when nipples have corroded in place), but that's no big deal. The Vuelta wheelsets seem to be ok, I'd say that the 32 spoke wheelset is probably more durable if it has been built properly, that is the spoke tension is high enough and evenly distributed around the wheel. Hard (read: impossible) to tell if that's the case without having the wheels in my hand.
Oh, and bike weight is neglegible when compared to rider weight. Many of us used think otherwise (I guess) but then looked at the numbers (well, I did). Lighter wheels will make a difference though.

Oops yes thats what I meant..."Freewheel"...still learning overhere and I get confused ...lol...

I am taking the bike to the lbs on my lunch break and see what they say. If I need new wheels then I will be purchasing the Vuelta wheels or something similar but lighter than what the bike has right now.

Do you have an recommendations on lighter wheels fairly durable but not too expensive?...I have a budget of maybe $135 for wheels...

thanks!
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#14
Lvely bike and I really like it. If you were in the UK i'd swap you 4 of my bikes for this.
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#15
(12-08-2012, 12:23 AM)hcjg1 Wrote:  Lvely bike and I really like it. If you were in the UK i'd swap you 4 of my bikes for this.

Wow...that sounds great!...too bad I dont travel to the UK like back in 2001 - 2006 ..otherwise I consider taking the bike with me Wink

Btw what bikes do u have?..
So I took her to the LBS yesterday picked her up today. She got new tubes and tires (700x26) and they checked all around and they say everything is in 100% working order they just adjusted a bit on the gears and the dropbar that was a bit too low for a beginner in my opinion. I was going to put a new handlebar tape but decided to wait for later because I don't know If I might be replacing the drop bar thats pretty small and narrow...I like it like that... but don't know if its going to work for my son, so wont be able to tell until he starts using it regularly and more than likely it wont be until spring . I installed a water bottle cage that I had laying around . The saddle was pretty beat up so I put on the one I took off from my Giant Defy roadie for now. The guys at the LBS also said that this is a great find . Smile

[attachment=3798]

[attachment=3799]
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#16
Very nice Smile. It must have been taken care of really well.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#17
Hm. In general a 32 spoke cross 3 hand built wheel is the best all-purpose, all year, non-racing solution, best with actual cup and cone hubs as those can be regreased (and they should be!). The Vueltas look sharp (and I seem to recall it is a decent brand), but on the other hand the others are more "true" to the style of the bike. I have a set of Mavic Aksium wheels (entry level, like the Vueltas) on my road bike, though those have no cup and cone bearings which is what I don't like about them. I guess in your price range this is what you can get. What you could (well, should) do is inspect the wheel bearings (not difficult, just messy the first time) and see if they are still ok. In that case, simply let the wheel be trued and tensioned, a "wobble" is most likely fixable, if it is not too wide and not too... sharp? short? Like, if it is only over two or three spokes.
Nigel may have some things to add, too...
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#18
(12-10-2012, 08:06 AM)Joe_W Wrote:  Hm. In general a 32 spoke cross 3 hand built wheel is the best all-purpose, all year, non-racing solution, best with actual cup and cone hubs as those can be regreased (and they should be!). The Vueltas look sharp (and I seem to recall it is a decent brand), but on the other hand the others are more "true" to the style of the bike. I have a set of Mavic Aksium wheels (entry level, like the Vueltas) on my road bike, though those have no cup and cone bearings which is what I don't like about them. I guess in your price range this is what you can get. What you could (well, should) do is inspect the wheel bearings (not difficult, just messy the first time) and see if they are still ok. In that case, simply let the wheel be trued and tensioned, a "wobble" is most likely fixable, if it is not too wide and not too... sharp? short? Like, if it is only over two or three spokes.
Nigel may have some things to add, too...

Thanks for the advice on the wheels...really helpfull .
The current wheels are in good condition so I wont be changing them in a while. At least I know and understand better for the future in case I decided to change them . Thanks again !
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#19
A few new items for the new Ride. I installed them myself Smile

Pedals cage
[attachment=3804]

Wired Cateye Mity 8
[attachment=3805]

And I just put a Bianchi decal to the saddle to cover the Giant print which is fading anyways Smile
[attachment=3806]
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#20
Now that I have seen close ups that is a VERY clean bike Smile Nice upgrades too.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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