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Tiger Omega Frame thoughts
#1
Hi again,
Still on the look-out for cheap replacement frame so I can cycling to the train station and back.
Please could anyone give advice on the Tiger Omega frame on ebay:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/TIGER-ROAD-BIKE-CYCLE-FRAME-FORK-SET-22-BRAND-NEW-OLD-STOCK-/370712143999?pt=UK_sportsleisure_cycling_bikeparts_SR&hash=item56502a687f

Let me know if the link doesn't work but also if its worth around £67 for frame+forks+headset+bb+delivery.
I have my old raleigh (~10-15yrs) which Im hoping all my bits will just fit on so minimal investment needed once I've got the frame.
Im kinda desperate so am quite tempted and it seems to look fairly strong (of course looks mean nothing) but better than buying say an old 80's/90's frame... When it comes down to it I am only looking for a cheap frame but if this lot is worth say £40 instead of 60 then I'd appreciate the advice Smile
Thanks
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#2
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=271131020436&ssPageName=ADME:X:RTQ:GB:1123&autorefresh=true

Just found this Viking firenza frame and forks set. Again, I know that Viking are only cheap and I get the impression they aren't great quality but its a frame...

Any thoughts?
Thanks again
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#3
Dan; personally, an '80's/'90s frame is better than most made today.

We know about your white frame coming apart. What is wrong with the grey Raleigh frame?

The Viking is aluminum, http://www.tigercycles.com/bikes/road/omega-blue-white.html says that the Tiger is hi ten steel.

The frame is the most important part of the bike; thus it's quality is paramount.

Look used for a good cro-mo or Reynolds frame (or complete bike) from the '70s to '90s.
Nigel
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#4
(01-04-2013, 10:52 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  Dan; personally, an '80's/'90s frame is better than most made today.

Why's that? I mean for the average 20yr old frames surely welds etc will be fairly weak. Also because of my failure it makes me seriously doubt the technique of brazing/welding the seat stays to the side of the seat tube compared to the commonplace method now of welding directly to the back.
But of course my view will be distorted from my incident. Its just thats what it makes me think.

(01-04-2013, 10:52 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  We know about your white frame coming apart. What is wrong with the grey Raleigh frame?
Which grey raleigh frame is that?

When you say that viking is Aluminium and the Tiger is steel, what did you mean by that?
Steel=stronger, aluminium=lighter so since they are both "cheap" the viking is possibly the less favourable option?

Finally, can you show me an example of a cro-mo?
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#5
(01-04-2013, 11:04 PM)Dan Wrote:  Why's that? I mean for the average 20yr old frames surely welds etc will be fairly weak. ........
Not true. Weld (or braze) strength is not diminished by age; mechanical flexing and chemical attack (rusting) can reduce joint strength over time. But a well made bicycle frame will last for many decades, even centuries. Starting with a poor quality joint results in failure. From the pictures you posted, it is obvious that the joint was not very well made. (I am an Engineer. http://www.linkedin.com/in/nigelmisso)

Dan Wrote:Which grey raleigh frame is that?
In the picture of the white frame that failed, there is a grey bike frame behind it.

Dan Wrote:When you say that viking is Aluminium and the Tiger is steel, what did you mean by that?
Steel=stronger, aluminium=lighter so since they are both "cheap" the viking is possibly the less favourable option?
What does it mean when someone says "grass is green"? It is a statement of fact, with no opinion offered.

Dan Wrote:Finally, can you show me an example of a cro-mo?
Here are my cro-mo framed bikes:
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-3167.html
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-3036.html
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-2920.html
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-3598.html

This one is Reynolds 531:
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-4198.html

And this one is hi-ten steel:
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-3216.html

Cro-mo and 531 are roughly equivalent for a bicycle frame - and are among the best of the steel alloys for a bicycle frame. The result in a lighter, stronger and smoother riding bike than one made of hi-ten steel, mainly because their higher yield strength allows thinner tubing and more flexible sections without failure. The raw material is more expensive, so it tends to be used with more care -> higher quality end product.

Alex, Bill and I each have cro-mo GT Triples that we have refurbished. Each of us built up very nice rides, and each of us took a different approach.
Nigel
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#6
Thanks for the advice and links.

Ah thats a purple ladies raleigh mountain bike, rather heavy!
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