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Quick release on a freewheel?
#1
G'day everyone!

Sorry for rushing into the forum with my first post like this, without even introducing myself or my bicycle first, but I'll do that when the time's right.

I'd like to ask a quick question before I head out to buy some used 700c wheels tonight. Since they are sold on a listing and the seller isn't really able to tell himself whether the back hub is a freewheel or a freehub, then I'd ask you guys.

[Image: s7V1m.jpg]
[Image: aNaL0.jpg]
[Image: 5hsCf.jpg]

Since the images aren't the best, I'm not able to tell myself either. Have you ever seen a quick release skew on a freewheel or are they only common to freehubs? I've had bad experience with freewheels (especially bent axles) before so I'd rather not fall for them again.

Awaiting for your opinions. Thanks!
Heiko
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#2
Freewheels can come with quick release hollow axles, though it is not so common as for cassette systems.

I have no way to tell from the detail in the photo whether it is a freewheel or cassette.
You can tell, if you get a close up, detailed picture of the rear cog, whether it is a screw-on freewheel or cassette by looking to see whether it has a lockring (cassette) or a splined recess in the freewheel body that accepts a freewheel removal tool.

Sheldon Brown gives the lowdown: http://sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html
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#3
Can't tell for sure without a closer picture of the gear cluster or the rear hub. I have seen QR on a freewheel. But if they are any decent wheel set, it's probably a freehub. And you're right about freewheels being prone to bent axles.

http://sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html
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#4
There have been many decent freewheel hubs made over the years.

There are freehub wheels without quick release too.
Nigel
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#5
Thanks for all the help, guys!
When I finally got there in the morning I realised that only the front wheel had a quick release skew. The back wheel has a Shimano MF-HG37 freewheel and nuts at the end of the axle. But since they seemed to be in great condition (considering they were straight and had pretty much no wear on the tires!) and were only 25 EUR (33 USD) I decided to give them a try. I can always replace the rear hub for a freehub if needed, right? At least I have some pretty narrow rims now (with the outside width of 19 mm).

I hope the resolution of the images won't be a problem.

http://i.imgur.com/i5QLg.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/YUdOP.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/aegDJ.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/DNUpq.jpg

On the other hand I could have had a set of Shimano WH-R 550 (although I've read some pretty nasty reviews on them) with a 10-speed cassette for 20 EUR, but I would have had to buy a new chain, new tubes and new tires.
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#6
(01-06-2013, 02:08 PM)Heiko Wrote:  ........
On the other hand I could have had a set of Shimano WH-R 550 (although I've read some pretty nasty reviews on them) with a 10-speed cassette for 20 EUR, but I would have had to buy a new chain, new tubes and new tires.

It is easy enough to put a 7, 8 or 9 speed cassette in place of a 10 speed.........
Nigel
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#7
The main problem with the lower-end hubs is that the manufacturers try to save some bucks on the grease. The WH-R 550s are notorious for having not enough grease in the hubs and the bearings being not adjusted all that well. Nothing too serious, if you know that in advance and correct this....
At least this is what I gather form several tests in cycling rags, I have no real experience with them.
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#8
Thanks for the fact nfmisso, but once I read reviews about constant spoke failures and considered that I ride on pretty harsh city and country roads sometimes, I gave up on that idea.

I read about the grease as well, Joe_W, but also that they have sealed bearings. Since I've done some reading on them, I'd like to stick with ball ones.

Also, I'd like to ask for some advice on the brakes. As you can see on the first picture, then there's some more space needed for a correct brake pad position. On the other picture you can see that there's some free space I could extend the brake connector into. What do you think? Would it be better than buying a 35 USD brake adapter (which I haven't seen anywhere locally anyway)?

http://i.imgur.com/RoNLc.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/G3PM3.jpg

Yes, it's rusty, but it's in the progress of being restored.
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#9
Just would like to say looks like you got a very nice deal on the wheels and tires. On the first picture you noticed the screw? You can loosen it and pull the cable tighter to bring the to canti-lever arms closer. Pretty simple just a pair of pliers and a hex wrench of the right size will do it. Wink.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#10
Thanks, Bill! It took some time to find those, because not many used bicycle parts are for sale (and for cheap) here in Estonia. I haven't been able to find rear axles anywhere online (yes, I mean it, the only ones I found were on eBay), although I haven't really visited any local bike shops, mainly because I don't live close to one.
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#11
Well, spoke failure is caused by a bad wheel build. Check out
http://www.sapim.be/sites/default/files/checklist.pdf
The tests I read were that spoke tension with the Shimano wheels was usually high enough and there were no ... well weird changes after riding that could point to incorrect wheel build. The wheel was still as round and true as before the tests.

Also: the Shimano WH-R 550 have cup and cone bearings, see the tech doc
http://techdocs.shimano.com/media/techdocs/content/cycle/EV/bikecomponents/WH/EV-WH-R550-F-2336C_v1_m56577569830728613.pdf
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#12
Didn't think of that Joe.
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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#13
Still, one has to take into account that this was only one specimen tested + the manufacturers sent it to the bike rag to test it. So... there's some room for doubts there.
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#14
(01-14-2013, 09:04 AM)Joe_W Wrote:  Still, one has to take into account that this was only one specimen tested + the manufacturers sent it to the bike rag to test it. So... there's some room for doubts there.

So science at that point is how the rag interprets it to be ! Wink (just kidding).
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
Reply
#15
(01-15-2013, 01:56 PM)Bill Wrote:  So science at that point is how the rag interprets it to be ! Wink (just kidding).

Well, let's just say getting the company whose product you want to test to send you a single specimen of the product does not really stand up to any close scrutiny from a scientific methodological point of view. If one of my students would try something like that... plus I'd be disappointed 'cause now it is I who is teaching stats and should have taught them better.

I guess here it all boils down to how much you trust both the producer and the magazine.
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