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Adjusting 105 FD problems
#1
I replaced my shifter cables and housings a couple days ago, the rear derailleur now works great, but I have been working on the FD for a few days and can't get it working right.

I've adjusted the FD on a few other bikes without a problem, but there is something I am not getting with this one. When I shift from the small chain ring to the medium chain ring half of the time, my chain starts to shift up but seems to bounce off the middle chain ring and then ends up on the frame (falls off). If I tighten the L screw at all, I can't shift down from the middle chain ring to the small ring (cable has slack, so it's resting on the L screw)

Other than the cable/limit screws, I've checked the height and rotation of the FD and lubed the pivot points. At a loss for what to do next. Like I mentioned, I just replaced the cables. I didn't cut the housing quite as long as they were previously, but I don't think they are TOO short. Also, I think I have the FD cable routed to the cable bolt correctly, but I included a picture just in case. Any ideas for what to look at next would be much appreciated!

The bike is a Lemond road bike from 2000 that I got recently. I just cleaned the bike from head to toe. I'm not sure how old the drive train components are, so maybe that is an issue? The RD works great, the FD though, not so much. I've included a couple pictures

[attachment=3863][attachment=3864][attachment=3865][attachment=3866] [attachment=3863]
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#2
first off it seems you have started to mutilate the front cable a bit. I leave the cable uncut until I have it dialed in so I have more to work with. your low limit screw should be set before the cable is ever attached so if you are fiddling with the L limit after the cable is attached that would mess things up from the start. your H screw should also be set before the cable is attached but can be dialed in a bit after the cable is attached.
I would like to a picture directly from the side to see your gap from front derailluer to the chainring. and go from there
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#3
(01-13-2013, 08:50 PM)painkiller Wrote:  first off it seems you have started to mutilate the front cable a bit. I leave the cable uncut until I have it dialed in so I have more to work with. your low limit screw should be set before the cable is ever attached so if you are fiddling with the L limit after the cable is attached that would mess things up from the start. your H screw should also be set before the cable is attached but can be dialed in a bit after the cable is attached.
I would like to a picture directly from the side to see your gap from front derailluer to the chainring. and go from there

Here's the side view, thanks for the response
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#4
lets start here by disconnecting the front cable. place chain on smallest ring in front and biggest cog in back, set the L limit so there is approx. 1 to 1.5mm clearance to chain, make sure shifter is clicked a couple times to the relaxed position. set the front derailluer so the outer cage is parallel to the big ring and so the bottom of the outer cage is approx. 2.5mm above the ring, use your finger to move derailluer out to look at this. back out your H limit for now.
in the picture you gave me I put a green dot on the tab that your cable should go over not under as you have it, the red dot shows the indent of the cable guide. string the cable like i said and start again.
if any time you have to touch the L limit because your first shift went to far you must disconnect the cable and start again if the fine tuning of the barrel adjuster does not workout
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#5
(01-13-2013, 10:11 PM)painkiller Wrote:  lets start here by disconnecting the front cable. place chain on smallest ring in front and biggest cog in back, set the L limit so there is approx. 1 to 1.5mm clearance to chain, make sure shifter is clicked a couple times to the relaxed position. set the front derailluer so the outer cage is parallel to the big ring and so the bottom of the outer cage is approx. 2.5mm above the ring, use your finger to move derailluer out to look at this. back out your H limit for now.
in the picture you gave me I put a green dot on the tab that your cable should go over not under as you have it, the red dot shows the indent of the cable guide. string the cable like i said and start again.
if any time you have to touch the L limit because your first shift went to far you must disconnect the cable and start again if the fine tuning of the barrel adjuster does not workout

Good catch about getting the cable OVER the tab. Made shifting much easier. I started over with the cable attachment a couple times too and shifting is working perfectly when I have the bike on the stand. When I actually pedal though, things were still a little rough. Is that just a factor of needing to fine tune some more?
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#6
not knowing what you mean by rough exactly, I will say that it should work just as well when applying pressure to the pedal. So take your time and figure it out as it sounds like you are getting close. Just make sure your cage is not touching anything but your chain when it's supposed too.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#7
(01-13-2013, 11:37 PM)painkiller Wrote:  not knowing what you mean by rough exactly, I will say that it should work just as well when applying pressure to the pedal. So take your time and figure it out as it sounds like you are getting close. Just make sure your cage is not touching anything but your chain when it's supposed too.

Thanks again for the help
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#8
I will mention but better to see in person, your outer and middle chain ring look quite worn, if they are then it may act rougher when pedal force is applied, especially if the chain to is worn
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#9
(01-14-2013, 12:03 AM)painkiller Wrote:  I will mention but better to see in person, your outer and middle chain ring look quite worn, if they are then it may act rougher when pedal force is applied, especially if the chain to is worn

I'm sure you are right about the chain ring wear. This bike is a 2000 model I inherited from my Dad last fall. I'm sure most of the drive train components are still the originals and he was probably putting 2-3K miles/yr while it was his main bike. I'm trying to pace how much I replace on this bike though...
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#10
I would just say that if you like the bike and it is good quality, which I would have to believe it is by looking at the components in the pics. That replacing normal wear and tear items is normal. Plus if you got the bike for free is even more reason to sweeten it up a bit, Is it a Lemond bike by chance? if so get the drivetrain in order and you got a nice ride for pennies on the dollar! and there are plenty people here on the tutor to help ya any time. and a great project bike to hone your skills
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#11
(01-14-2013, 10:04 PM)painkiller Wrote:  I would just say that if you like the bike and it is good quality, which I would have to believe it is by looking at the components in the pics. That replacing normal wear and tear items is normal. Plus if you got the bike for free is even more reason to sweeten it up a bit, Is it a Lemond bike by chance? if so get the drivetrain in order and you got a nice ride for pennies on the dollar! and there are plenty people here on the tutor to help ya any time. and a great project bike to hone your skills

Yes, it is a 2000 LeMond Alpe d'Huez. You are right, it is a perfect bike for me: nice, but needs some upkeep. It's been very rewarding to learn how all the systems work and I think the maintenance aspect has been a big part of why I've gotten so hooked.

This site has been a huge help with the couple of issues I've run into and just skimming through old threads to get some ideas. So far I've been working on the easy stuff: new handle bars, tape, overhauling the hubs, etc. I guess it's time to look into taking it up a notch.
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#12
(01-14-2013, 10:04 PM)painkiller Wrote:  I would just say that if you like the bike and it is good quality, which I would have to believe it is by looking at the components in the pics. That replacing normal wear and tear items is normal. Plus if you got the bike for free is even more reason to sweeten it up a bit, Is it a Lemond bike by chance? if so get the drivetrain in order and you got a nice ride for pennies on the dollar! and there are plenty people here on the tutor to help ya any time. and a great project bike to hone your skills

I was just looking at the Tech document for the 105 STI lever and I think part of my problem has been I didn't realize how the trim function worked. I'm going to take a look at it again over the weekend, but that would explain why I was having problems getting the lower limit screw set up right.
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#13
Another update: I realized the previous owner was using a 10 speed chain on the 9 speed drivetrain. I think the extra narrowness of the 10 speed chain was making it tough for the chain to land on the teeth consistently. I put a new 9 speed chain on and it seems to be shifting more smoothly.
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#14
(01-16-2013, 02:18 AM)larsonian Wrote:  I was just looking at the Tech document for the 105 STI lever and I think part of my problem has been I didn't realize how the trim function worked. I'm going to take a look at it again over the weekend, but that would explain why I was having problems getting the lower limit screw set up right.

Yup, true, that one. Caught me, too, when setting it up. Once you realise wher the trim steps are it is much easier! Good luck!
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