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Rear brake sticking?
#21
(04-18-2013, 09:26 PM)Acebars Wrote:  ......
A couple of questions before I do so, the frame I've bought is a 22 1/2 inch (57cm) and I'm 5'10"-5'10.5" tall with a 32" inseam and it seemed a little big for me to be honest when I was trying it out like I was really leaning over with no bend in my elbows to reach the handle bars.
.....

I am 5'11" with a 32" trouser inseam, and like 58cm (23") frames for road bikes.......
Nigel
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#22
So maybe I am the correct size, will try it again later. A few calculators have told me 55cm for road bikes, including a very detailed online one.

Lets say the calculators are wrong, is it a bad idea to have a frame that is slightly too small for you?
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#23
(04-19-2013, 10:43 AM)Acebars Wrote:  .......
Lets say the calculators are wrong, is it a bad idea to have a frame that is slightly too small for you?

The possible problems with a too small frame:
* seat post not having enough engagement in the frame and/or too much above frame - can lead to a bent, then broken seat post.
* handle bars to close - can be solved with longer neck.
* short wheelbase with higher center of gravity will result in twitchier handling.

All of us are different, and even if our measurements are the same, we will usually like a slightly different fit on our bikes. Even for one person, we will want a different fit on different bikes, and our wants will change over time. For example, I have ridden my SR over 5K miles in the past couple of years, and now, I am thinking that I want to raise the handle bars a bit.

Just make sure that you do not end up with a bike that you are at the limits of any adjustment. You want 3 to 5 inches of seat post showing when you are comfortable. Typically, as you gain more experience, you will want to raise the saddle.
Nigel
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#24
(04-19-2013, 02:46 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  
(04-19-2013, 10:43 AM)Acebars Wrote:  .......
Lets say the calculators are wrong, is it a bad idea to have a frame that is slightly too small for you?

The possible problems with a too small frame:
* seat post not having enough engagement in the frame and/or too much above frame - can lead to a bent, then broken seat post.
* handle bars to close - can be solved with longer neck.
* short wheelbase with higher center of gravity will result in twitchier handling.

All of us are different, and even if our measurements are the same, we will usually like a slightly different fit on our bikes. Even for one person, we will want a different fit on different bikes, and our wants will change over time. For example, I have ridden my SR over 5K miles in the past couple of years, and now, I am thinking that I want to raise the handle bars a bit.

Just make sure that you do not end up with a bike that you are at the limits of any adjustment. You want 3 to 5 inches of seat post showing when you are comfortable. Typically, as you gain more experience, you will want to raise the saddle.

Ah ok, so better I stick with the 57cm, right?
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#25
If you feel too stretched on your current frame but the seatpost is not at it's limit you might want to keep the frame and get a stem with a shorter "neck". That might be all. As Nigel also commented, do not get too stuck up with the frame size (the numbers, that is). Judging those calculations my cyclocross-turned-french-road-bike would be too big, yet I really enjoy riding it.
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#26
(04-19-2013, 03:36 PM)Joe_W Wrote:  If you feel too stretched on your current frame but the seatpost is not at it's limit you might want to keep the frame and get a stem with a shorter "neck". That might be all. As Nigel also commented, do not get too stuck up with the frame size (the numbers, that is). Judging those calculations my cyclocross-turned-french-road-bike would be too big, yet I really enjoy riding it.

I'll finally be home tomorrow, I maybe over thinking everything and also I might not have raised the seat high enough to get a real feel for the bike, so it might be that 57cm is perfect for me. You guys are great will keep you posted as soon as I get back!
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#27
Hi AceBars,

It's great that you got your brakes fixed. It's good that the brakes you have on an older road bike frame is dual pivot and long reach vs older single pivot brakes.

As for bike fit. Bike fit is actually very important and a person's bike fit can change over time especially on a road bike if they choose to ride more aero as they become more flexible. Having a good bike fit also gives you more control for the bike as well as more power to the legs.

I actually got proficient in fitting friends and family on a bike over the last 2 years since I started riding again 4 years ago. Let it be fitting Road bikes, hybrids, to mountain bikes and the various types of different bodies that I had to deal with.

I am no expert road bike fitter, but getting much better for the recreational rider. There are no right or wrong answers, but just guidelines in helping someone fit on their bike better. Most important is the rider's comfort and flexibility.

And don't bother with those online calculators since they just general give you an idea so that you are not too far off on the frame size.

Also note most road bikes frames today have a compact/semi-compact design than road bikes in the 70s-90s....So you might fit a bigger bike from that era vs one that smaller today with a shorter standover height.

OK just to get you started....

I would read through this page provided by REI:
http://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/bike-fit.html

Note it's a starting point, but I would refine some of those instructions and make some clarifications.


For older bikes which general don't have as much as a standover, I would start with that.
Since the rule of thumb for road bikes is about 1inch stand over clearance. Straddle the bike. Lift up the bike while keeping the bike horizontally even til the top tube hits your pelvic bone. If there's about 1 inch clearance from the tires to the ground, then you're probably ok for standover height for that frame. If the toptube of the bike hits your pelvic bone already that the frame is not right for you for sure.

Next thing is to get seat height adjusted and then seat position.......after all that is done.. you adjust the stem of the bike.

There are a few other instructions I would add in the REI instructions for seat height adjustments. I'll finish this write up later tonight or over this weekend. But I recall when I first started dealing with seat height adjustment, the most frequent question I asked myself what is a slight bend at the knee?? There's a heel trick in fitting that will gauge that you have about the right slight knee bend. Anyway I'll write it up later this week.... but just wanted to get you started...


However, I do have one question for you.....where do you normally grab when riding your road bike? Do you ride on the hoods? drops? tops?



Oh hey another thing ... I did notice your rear wheel has a 5 speed freewheel.. and don't trust it has the right number spacers to make it a 120mm.. or 126mm or 130mm...

If that is the original 5 speed freewheel on the hub and if it has never been taken off, it's very highly likely seized on the hub. I've taken off some really stuck freewheels with 300ft-lbs of torque with an impact gun and even before then using a vise and the wheel as leverage did not help.

First thing is the measure the rear dropouts and see what you have to work with... Hopefully it's about 126mm dropout and not 120mm dropout.

You can use a centimeter ruler for this If it's 12cm vs 12.5cm. At least it'll give you an idea.

If it's about 12.5 cm.

You're in luck, you can stick a 130mm road wheel today and you can squeeze it in with not much of a problem.

Here's a great sale going for entry level road wheels.

http://www.bikewagon.com/maddux-r3-0-700c-road-wheelset-32h-9-10-speed-w-vittoria-zaffiro-tire

It's now $74.99 plus shipping and comes with good tires

Last week it was $64.99... I guess they realized it's a hot selling item and boosted the price.

from the looks of it.. you're brakes should be able to use 700c wheels.
Hopefully you're shifters are friction so you can stick a 8 speed cassette and get a new 8 speed chain.

Anyway before you get all of that... first find out the rear dropout spacing and then see if the frame fits you with some mods.
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#28
Ok finally got back, and had a look at everything. Now must answer many questions!

(04-09-2013, 07:28 PM)DaveM Wrote:  When you took off the "spacer" from the rear axle, was it a threaded nut or just a hollow unthreaded tube that slid over the axle? If it was the outer nut, the axle needs that in place to hold the adjustment on the bearings. Without it there, when you tighten down the nut that holds it to the frame, it tightens up the bearings too (which is why the wheel won't spin.)

There is an unthreaded tube on one side. I realise what I'd done wrong to actually balance the wheel, I took off one of the nuts from one side to get the wheel central.

So I put that nut back on, and mounted the wheel. It is a little wide for the frame but goes on. Now I can tighten it up so its rideable, but again if I tighten it up too much the wheel isn't totally free.

haykong its a 126mm rear and 100mm front. To be honest I think I'm going to buy a set of old campagnolos that should be on this bike, because I really don't like the dodgy rear wheel business.

I did an accurate measuring online thingy and it came out with 55cm again, I'm going to ride the bike anyway but it does feel like I'm leaning over quite a bit and my arms are locked regardless of seat height unless I lean right over.

Quote:However, I do have one question for you.....where do you normally grab when riding your road bike? Do you ride on the hoods? drops? tops?

I do the drops if I'm going fast and pushing it, when I'm casualing around town I do the tops and I usually mount suicide brakes which I find to be very ok. I think they are 700c wheels and the bolt on I have is 130?

I wanted to thank all of you for so much help very kind, I may actually get into this and look to restore a reynolds or something.
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#29
(04-22-2013, 10:38 AM)Acebars Wrote:  Ok finally got back, and had a look at everything. Now must answer many questions!

(04-09-2013, 07:28 PM)DaveM Wrote:  When you took off the "spacer" from the rear axle, was it a threaded nut or just a hollow unthreaded tube that slid over the axle? If it was the outer nut, the axle needs that in place to hold the adjustment on the bearings. Without it there, when you tighten down the nut that holds it to the frame, it tightens up the bearings too (which is why the wheel won't spin.)

There is an unthreaded tube on one side. I realise what I'd done wrong to actually balance the wheel, I took off one of the nuts from one side to get the wheel central.

So I put that nut back on, and mounted the wheel. It is a little wide for the frame but goes on. Now I can tighten it up so its rideable, but again if I tighten it up too much the wheel isn't totally free.

haykong its a 126mm rear and 100mm front. To be honest I think I'm going to buy a set of old campagnolos that should be on this bike, because I really don't like the dodgy rear wheel business.

I did an accurate measuring online thingy and it came out with 55cm again, I'm going to ride the bike anyway but it does feel like I'm leaning over quite a bit and my arms are locked regardless of seat height unless I lean right over.

Quote:However, I do have one question for you.....where do you normally grab when riding your road bike? Do you ride on the hoods? drops? tops?

I do the drops if I'm going fast and pushing it, when I'm casualing around town I do the tops and I usually mount suicide brakes which I find to be very ok. I think they are 700c wheels and the bolt on I have is 130?

I wanted to thank all of you for so much help very kind, I may actually get into this and look to restore a reynolds or something.

130mm wheel on a 126mm drop shouldn't be hard to get on and does not require a mallet. ... unless your wheel was spaced 135mm.. Ton's of people have put 130mm wheels on 126 dropouts.. Also I've done that on my 1984 schwinn worldsport (cromo 4130 frame) and have no issues on 8 speed briefters. .. also my friend has a 1986 miyata triple cross and it also has a 126mm drop out and has no issues squeezing in a 130mm wheel.

However if the bike frame is aluminum, then I wouldn't bother squeezing the bigger hub size... but since you say your bike frame is a Reynolds 531 frame.. why not? In the end it's up to you.

I have tons of tons of bikes.. old ones..new ones.. etc... rescued told chromo frames from seized aluminum stems and seatposts and updated old frames with more recent stuff.

why don't you measure the wheel spacing?


If you feel a little stretched...what about changing to a shorter stem? or a drop bar that has a shorter reach?

Note seat height does affect reach.... as you raise the seat it puts you further away from the bars... that's why it's important to first get your seat put at about the correct height.. then adjust the seat either forward or backwards so that you the back end of your knee cap drops a straight line to the pedal when your crank arms are horizontal ... .hmm I don't think i'm explaining it right.. it's much easier putting a friend on their bike with a trainer and doing the fitting process. ..

but my point is we need to first fit you and find out if the top tube length of your frame is too long or not.... or it can be adjusted by stem length and or dropbar reach...
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#30
Just curious what's the toptube length on your frame? And how long is your stem (measures from center to center)?

don't forget bike size calculators don't factor in that you have a non modern frame ......today a lot of frames are compact/semi-compact design.
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#31
(04-22-2013, 09:03 PM)haykong Wrote:  130mm wheel on a 126mm drop shouldn't be hard to get on and does not require a mallet. ... unless your wheel was spaced 135mm.. Ton's of people have put 130mm wheels on 126 dropouts.. Also I've done that on my 1984 schwinn worldsport (cromo 4130 frame) and have no issues on 8 speed briefters. .. also my friend has a 1986 miyata triple cross and it also has a 126mm drop out and has no issues squeezing in a 130mm wheel....

I didn't measure the wheel or how its spaced. whatever it is it requires malleting on, no other way about it, and I tried removing nuts and spacers but doing so makes the wheel unmountable or I run into the bearing issue I had before. I don't have other spacers and things to mess about with unfortunately.

Quote:but my point is we need to first fit you and find out if the top tube length of your frame is too long or not.... or it can be adjusted by stem length and or dropbar reach...

Yea I'm getting very confused with all the frame stuff. I just looked at my non-reynolds emmelle road bike which actually has a 23" seat tube so 1/2" larger than the reynolds but actually has a shorter top tube than the reynolds (forget the measurements now). The emmelle actually fits me better and I'm sure its to do with the top tube, its been mentioned to me before and I think its right that seat tube length is less important than top tube length as you can always raise or lower the seat.

Quote:what about changing to a shorter stem?

Can you explain what that means? I'm new to bicycle stuff.

Quote:Just curious what's the toptube length on your frame? And how long is your stem (measures from center to center)?

don't forget bike size calculators don't factor in that you have a non modern frame ......today a lot of frames are compact/semi-compact design.

Yea will try and check again tomorrow. The calculator I did had a chart for older fitting as well so you could compare with newer more compact I came up at 55cm, just wish I could find a Reynolds 531 size chart. Thanks for all the pointers.
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#32
Reynolds 531 is just the tubes the bike is constructed of. The actual geometry is decided by the frame designer / builder.

The stem is the thing that the drop bars are clamped to.
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