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Manufactured handlebars wrong?
#1
Hey guys, im not an expert on bikes, but i really need to see if what im thinking is correct. So my girlfriend ordered a bike, and when i tried to put it together, it seems that the handle bars or the front forks have been built incorrectly.

The forks face the wrong way and the handlebars the right way.
But if i spin the spin the wheel to make the forks face the correct way, there is no way for me to correct the handlebars as they have this 'slanted slotting' system.

I badly drew a diagram for you to maybe understand a little. But it seems to me that the bike was built incorrectly....or maybe you could help?

[Image: bikefail_zps27fdf3c3.png]
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#2
Just guessing based on your drawings. But I think you're confusing how the handlebar stem attaches. There is a bolt that runs through the stem down to the end where it is cut off at an angle. There should be a small metal wedge that screws onto this bolt at the bottom of the stem. The wedge tightens against the bottom of the stem and that tightens it inside the fork. The bolt does not screw in to the fork itself.

http://www.montaguebikes.com/assets/images/ownermanual/stem-diagram.jpg

If the wedge is stick inside the fork, you can try taking off the wheel and putting something up through the bottom of the fork to knock it out.
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#3
how about some close-up pics.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#4
Thank you for replying, i know there is a bolt which fastens it all together. From the diagram you attached i see that my 'stem wedge' has been installed back to front and therefore is creating my problem. Sadly i don't think i'll be able to take it back to the manufacturer and will probably have to contact a bicycle repair store to re-weld the 'stem wedge' the correct way around.
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#5
(05-22-2013, 09:13 PM)ghostwolf Wrote:  will probably have to contact a bicycle repair store to re-weld the 'stem wedge' the correct way around.

I'm pretty sure the parts were made ok. The wedge should be able to turn around in order to fit the stem correctly. That said, taking it into a shop to get the bike assembled is probably a good idea. There are a number of things that should be checked and adjusted on a new bike and it can be a little tricky if you aren't familiar with bike mechanics. There are safety issues if you get some of these things put together wrong. Get some help Smile
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#6
Thanks again, the wedge is actually welded into the fork stem, and i've tried every possible way i can to turn the stem itself, but no to avail.
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#7
Here a more accurate drawing of the issue. The little slanted wedge at the bottom of the fork stem is welded in place.

[Image: fdhdfh_zps5a167d2d.jpg]
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#8
Handlebars removed, bike upside down, remove the front wheel, look down at the bottom of the wedge, get a long rod, like a socket set extension and a light weight hammer. Use the extension to rapid tap the wedge with light sharp blows.
I believe you are mistaken, the wedge is NOT welded in place, it just looks like it. If it was welded, how would you adjust handlebar height?
And if a local bike shop was going to reweld it, they would knock it out first anyway.
Whack it from the bottom, up towards where the handlebars would be.
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#9
And that is why i started a thread, because i didn't think of that! Thank you 1FJEF, i will go and give it a go in a few minutes and return with the verdict :3
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#10
It worked! Of course its not welded, i see why now! And it fixed the other problem i had which was not being able to tighten the handlebars properly. So thats great! Thank you 1EFJEF! I guess i didn't think about it before cause i didn't want to undo the brakes and everything but now i know some more about bikes :3

Thanks again Big Grin
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#11
(05-23-2013, 11:30 AM)1FJEF Wrote:  Handlebars removed, bike upside down, remove the front wheel, look down at the bottom of the wedge, get a long rod, like a socket set extension and a light weight hammer. Use the extension to rapid tap the wedge with light sharp blows.
I believe you are mistaken, the wedge is NOT welded in place, it just looks like it. If it was welded, how would you adjust handlebar height?
And if a local bike shop was going to reweld it, they would knock it out first anyway.
Whack it from the bottom, up towards where the handlebars would be.

Ok so i mentioned that i fixed it with your instructions and all seemed fine and dandy, so i took it for a ride this evening. And noticed during the ride that the handle bars become slightly loose. I decided to go straight home to check it out. On the way i needed to mount a kerb and of course pulled the front wheel up to not damage the tyre. However, the handlebars pulled straight out with the stem wedge hanging off the bottom. And now i literally have no idea what to do to fix this... >_<

example:
[Image: bleh_zpsc7bedd70.jpg]
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#12
When properly installed and tightened, the wedge at the bottom will be in intimate contact with the handle bar stem, with the bolt extending below - you will not be able to see this because it will be inside the metal tube of the forks.

Install the handle bars to the desired height, making sure that there is enough engagement to secure the handle bars - there is a mark on the handle bar stem that should not be visible - tighten up the bolt complete, which will pull the wedge into intimate contact with the stem.
Nigel
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#13
Your drawings are very nice. I suggest looking carefully at the link Dave send you. It should explain how things work.

As Nigel said the two wedges slide against each other and expand as to top bolt is tightened to hold the stem to the fork. Tighten top bolt, but do not strip it by using too much force.

http://www.montaguebikes.com/assets/images/ownermanual/stem-diagram.jpg

This drawing shows the wedges in the open position the top bolt draws them tight.
Never Give Up!!!
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#14
Ok, i see that you're saying really, is that i just need to tighten the bolt properly.

I know they are at a good height as i literally have them the lowest they can go, and i've tightened the bolt to its full potential. Perhaps i need to be more firm.

I'll give it another go as soon as i find the time and let you know how it goes.
Have a good weekend!
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#15
did you grease the inside of the tube and the wedge face? It is important to do that so the wedge will slide freely and then clamp hard. Also the threads need to be greased.
Nigel
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