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Fell in love with a tire
#1
Fyxation Session 700x28c. Anyone know about this tire? It's as much per tire as a Continental. Around $40 per each.

Love it for the brown tread. My Univega has 27 x 1 1/8 Araya rims.

Will this fit? I once had a 32c tire on this bike...
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#2
(05-30-2013, 03:57 AM)redfoxglove Wrote:  Fyxation Session 700x28c. My Univega has 27 x 1 1/8 Araya rims.
Will this fit? I once had a 32c tire on this bike...
I think you have a typo. The Session fits a 622mm (700c) rim & the Araya you describe is a 630mm (27") rim. Double check the rim width with calipers, my 27" Araya wheels will take 27" x 28mm & 32mm tires easily.
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#3
(05-30-2013, 04:25 AM)1FJEF Wrote:  
(05-30-2013, 03:57 AM)redfoxglove Wrote:  Fyxation Session 700x28c. My Univega has 27 x 1 1/8 Araya rims.
Will this fit? I once had a 32c tire on this bike...
I think you have a typo. The Session fits a 622mm (700c) rim & the Araya you describe is a 630mm (27") rim. Double check the rim width with calipers, my 27" Araya wheels will take 27" x 28mm & 32mm tires easily.

I will check the inside rim (right, the inside?) when I get home, the bike is not with me right now. I might have written it down wrong, I think the rim says 27 x 1 1/8 stamped next to Araya. But you're saying your 27" Araya takes 27" tires with a 28 or 32 mm diameter. And NOT a 700c tire with 28 or 32 mm diameter.

(At one time in the past a bike mechanic put a fatter tire on my bike than what was stock, he called it a 32C. He said, it is not quite the right size for your rim but I think it will work, if it doesn't, bring it back. It was a great ride, spendy for me at the time. But it must have been a 27" x 32c. Those tires are not on the bike anymore, what's on there is some generic something with no marks)

I looked at Sheldon brown site, he just says 'anything 27 is a road bike' didn't help me much. Except for the diagram on how to measure the rim.

Do you know about this Session tire? I want the look of it (brown tread, white sidewall) but not if it's just flash no performance. There is one review of it on Amazon. It might be a waste of time to think about it because if I am reading you right, it does not fit my rim.

Thanks
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#4
(05-30-2013, 05:11 AM)redfoxglove Wrote:  
(05-30-2013, 04:25 AM)1FJEF Wrote:  
(05-30-2013, 03:57 AM)redfoxglove Wrote:  Fyxation Session 700x28c. My Univega has 27 x 1 1/8 Araya rims.
Will this fit? I once had a 32c tire on this bike...
I think you have a typo. The Session fits a 622mm (700c) rim & the Araya you describe is a 630mm (27") rim. Double check the rim width with calipers, my 27" Araya wheels will take 27" x 28mm & 32mm tires easily.

(At one time in the past a bike mechanic put a fatter tire on my bike than what was stock, he called it a 32C. He said, it is not quite the right size for your rim but I think it will work, if it doesn't, bring it back. It was a great ride, spendy for me at the time. But it must have been a 27" x 32c. Those tires are not on the bike anymore, what's on there is some generic something with no marks)

Here's something I found on ben's blog about the session:

"Right now they come in a 28c, which is more like a 32c and hopefully a 38c or a 40c to follow. The pricepoint is right up there with other premium tires, which is to be expected. I can be honest though, they have lasted weeks longer than other tires I’ve ridden recently. They don’t loosen up or weaken after weeks of riding like others do. I went through 2 Randos in the time a Sessions tire lasted on the rear wheel."
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#5
The diameter is called a 27". Your rim is also known as a 630mm. The width of the tire is 28 or 32mm. You cannot mount a 700c tire on a 27" rim & visa versa.
I've never seen completely unmarked tires, try looking again, or check the rim, the Araya should be marked
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#6
Hi Redfoxglove:

Please see this: http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html

note for a tire to fit on a rim, that the ISO number BSD MUST match; there is a LOT of freedom in the width for any given rim - anything from the rim inner width to more than twice the rim inner width is used. The wider the tire, generally the smoother the ride. The rougher the road, results in softer tires being faster.
Nigel
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#7
thanks, you guys
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#8
Okay, next question, thanks you guys for helping me sort it out.

I've read otherwise that another option is to switch to 700c rims, as there are so many other options for tires in this size now that 27" are sort of history.

On the one hand, the rims I have are Araya 27" and after truing are going to be still very high quality for some years to come, at least as many years as I still have left to ride the bike. It would be a waste to let them go to waste, but I am going to have to pay someone to true them (time is shorter than money for me at this point)...

On the other hand, 700c rims will give me more options, like for the Fyxation?

What measurements should I look for to see if 700c rims will even fit my bike? (maybe you already supplied the link above, I haven't checked it yet)

And what would I expect to pay for sealed hubs like what I already have? Is there a respected type or brand given the goal of supporting a light touring/training end use?

Thank you
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#9
(05-30-2013, 06:05 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  Hi Redfoxglove:

Please see this: http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html

note for a tire to fit on a rim, that the ISO number BSD MUST match; there is a LOT of freedom in the width for any given rim - anything from the rim inner width to more than twice the rim inner width is used. The wider the tire, generally the smoother the ride. The rougher the road, results in softer tires being faster.

Thanks, Nigel, I did go back and look at Sheldon's charts and diagrams again. I see that according to his chart the 700c is a 29" diameter and mine is 27". That's a big difference.

When I look at my bike, the frame is so small compared to the size of the wheels already, I highly doubt a 700c is going to fit my bike.

This is the problem with small frames for short (women) people. The wheels seem oversized.

Anyway, thank you for the details and explanations. Yes, I have experienced how a wider/softer tire can be faster. And the skinny tires just don't feel good even if they look cool!
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#10
(05-31-2013, 05:08 AM)redfoxglove Wrote:  I see that according to his chart the 700c is a 29" diameter and mine is 27". That's a big difference.

Look at the chart again. 700 is smaller than 27", not larger. The "29" size refers to the outer dimension of a 700c wheel with a large, mtn bike style tire on it. You have to look at the ISO number, the "fractional" sizes are misleading.

If you switch to 700, you will have slightly smaller diameter wheels and slightly larger tire clearance. One problem people may have is whether their brakes will reach the new rims which will sit about 1/4" inch lower and if they will have clearance for the new tire as well.

27s definitely have less choice of tires. But there's nothing inherently wrong with them.
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#11
(05-31-2013, 01:29 PM)DaveM Wrote:  
(05-31-2013, 05:08 AM)redfoxglove Wrote:  I see that according to his chart the 700c is a 29" diameter and mine is 27". That's a big difference.

Look at the chart again. 700 is smaller than 27", not larger. The "29" size refers to the outer dimension of a 700c wheel with a large, mtn bike style tire on it. You have to look at the ISO number, the "fractional" sizes are misleading.

If you switch to 700, you will have slightly smaller diameter wheels and slightly larger tire clearance. One problem people may have is whether their brakes will reach the new rims which will sit about 1/4" inch lower and if they will have clearance for the new tire as well.

27s definitely have less choice of tires. But there's nothing inherently wrong with them.

Dave, thank you for this clarity. Doing my obsessional work at late night after long work days has its inherent problems! OK, so maybe 700c will fit my bike and give me more options on tires. That's tempting because I am drawn to these fancy looking colored tires that are all over now and many are reviewed as being top quality. But I kind of like the Araya rims and as you say, there's nothing inherently wrong with them. They certainly are light and still look really nice. And there are some nice tires out there for 27".

Now that I've flown across the state for a couple days at home I can take some measurements of the bike. Thank you for helping me along this trail. The next question is if the Shimano 105 brake calipers will fit my 27" or require 700c.

Fun!
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#12
Hi Redfoxglove:

Lots and lots of choices.

If you love your present hubs, keep them and have new ISO622 (700c) rims and new spokes on them. A few years ago, I bought a set of ISO630 (27") wheels, Array rims, Suzue sealed bearing hubs, 36h front, 40h rear, freewheel. Last year, I built a new set of wheels using Sun CR18 ISO590 rims, and Wheelsmith SS14 spokes using the Suzue hubs for my SR Sierra.

If you like your current wheels (rims, hubs, spokes) keep them. With rim brakes, the rims are what wears out, and if you can find rims with the same ERD (or close), you can swap the rims, keeping the existing spokes.

Before you spend money, sit down and write out a list of musts and wants. For me, appearance is very low on my want list; reliability is a must.
Nigel
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#13
(05-31-2013, 03:43 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  Hi Redfoxglove:

Lots and lots of choices.

If you love your present hubs, keep them and have new ISO622 (700c) rims and new spokes on them. A few years ago, I bought a set of ISO630 (27") wheels, Array rims, Suzue sealed bearing hubs, 36h front, 40h rear, freewheel. Last year, I built a new set of wheels using Sun CR18 ISO590 rims, and Wheelsmith SS14 spokes using the Suzue hubs for my SR Sierra.

If you like your current wheels (rims, hubs, spokes) keep them. With rim brakes, the rims are what wears out, and if you can find rims with the same ERD (or close), you can swap the rims, keeping the existing spokes.

Before you spend money, sit down and write out a list of musts and wants. For me, appearance is very low on my want list; reliability is a must.

I had not thought about the rim being worn out. Sheesh. I was only thinking about having them trued. Hubs, by feel, by ride, seem to still be awesome. Smooth feel, quiet. Spokes all still look straight, I think they are stainless too, and the wheels aren't that far out of true but noticeable if you know what you're looking at. Rims, hmmm...they look scratchy, might indicate excessive wear.

Yeah, I got the list. Trouble is, you knowledgeable guys are making it longer with things I never thought to think about. Seems to me that's the "problem" with guys anyway, LOL, they always have something up their sleeve that never even entered a gal's mind. Spin your world.

Must: look good and feel good. Must: high quality regardless of brand name

Thanks ni
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#14
(05-30-2013, 07:36 AM)1FJEF Wrote:  The diameter is called a 27". Your rim is also known as a 630mm. The width of the tire is 28 or 32mm. You cannot mount a 700c tire on a 27" rim & visa versa.
I've never seen completely unmarked tires, try looking again, or check the rim, the Araya should be marked

Yes, poor light. In good light:

National Tire Co., made in Japan, 28 x 630

Araya 27 x 1 1/8 W/D

Rims look good, edges are not very worn from brakes, I think I'm going to keep them. Thanks for teaching all these small details that a person needs to know to be more independent and confident on the road away from home.
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#15
There are LOTS of tire choices for 630 (aka 27"). A safe reliable tire is sold by Wal-mart, the brand is Bell in a Silver-grey box. It is smooth riding, 32mm wide, with Kevlar belts under the tread for puncture resistance. I have one on the front on my World Tourist, and will be putting one on the back when it is time.

For a selection of tires, go to:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=node%3D3404981&field-keywords=27&rh=n%3A3375251%2Cn%3A3403201%2Cn%3A6388965011%2Cn%3A3404981%2Ck%3A27

I have a Specialized Armadillo on the back of my World Tourist - the tire is VERY heavy. It is as tough as advertised, but does require a rather high minimum inflation pressure.

I use Stop Flats 2 liners on all of my bikes. The 622 (700c) size work fine with 630 (27) tires.
Nigel
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