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Getting what I want.
#1
I'm new here , and I hope my question isn't too noobish. Im looking to buy myself a bicycle.There are so many different styles on the market, it's hard to choose just one. I have an idea in my mind , but so far , I'm unable to find exactly what I'm looking for.. I want a 29'er, with a front suspension, disc brakes.Here is where I have a problem, I really want a 3 speed with the gears inside the rear hub. I have found what I want only it's in a single speed, I just dont want to start this new hobby changing parts . I'd like a "turn key" deal if it's at all possible. I have seen 3 , and 8 speed hubs , but none with a front suspension and disc brakes. I would appreciate any help at all. Thanks
jwill758

I think I attached a photo (I tried) of a single speed of a bike I'd like. I just dont know whats involved in swapping hubs. Last time I worked on a bike was 1967. Im pretty sure things have changed since then.
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#2
Interesting. That's the first time I've ever heard of that combination.
3 speed and other "internal geared hubs" are great, but they're generally used for transportation/utility bikes because they are low maintenance, simple to use, more durable against bumps, weather, etc. However, they're not really designed for "performance". The first question is what you want to use the bike for. If it will be a off road trail bike, internal hubs are heavier, may not hold up to high stress pedaling and shifting, etc. I don't think you'd be able to get an internal hub set up for disk brakes (unless something new has just come out.)

For an off road bike, what you could set up is a 1x8, 1x9, 1x10, etc. That means a single front chainring with a normal derailleur gear range in the rear. If you want to get real fancy, you might be able to set up a 1x3 by replacing a lot of the cogs on the rear cassette with spacers, but you'd have to find a derailleur with limits that could be set that close.

If what you're looking for is an urban, beat around town bike, then the internal geared hubs are great, but you don't want to start with a mtn bike. There are lots of urban/transportation/comfort bikes that might be better pre-built to what you want.

Tell us what you'll be using the bike for and we'll be able to give you better guidance.
Well, apparently I'm out of date! Lots of 3 speed hubs with disk brake:

http://www.shimano.com/publish/content/global_cycle/en/us/index/products/0/nexus/product.-code-SG-3D55.-type-..html

http://www.sram.com/sram/urban/products/i-motion-3-disc-brake

http://www.sturmey-archer.com/products/hubs/cid/8/id/59

Again, I've never seen something like this on an off road specific bike, but maybe it wouldn't so hard to do.
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#3
(06-13-2013, 12:28 PM)DaveM Wrote:  Interesting. That's the first time I've ever heard of that combination.
3 speed and other "internal geared hubs" are great, but they're generally used for transportation/utility bikes because they are low maintenance, simple to use, more durable against bumps, weather, etc. However, they're not really designed for "performance". The first question is what you want to use the bike for. If it will be a off road trail bike, internal hubs are heavier, may not hold up to high stress pedaling and shifting, etc. I don't think you'd be able to get an internal hub set up for disk brakes (unless something new has just come out.)

For an off road bike, what you could set up is a 1x8, 1x9, 1x10, etc. That means a single front chainring with a normal derailleur gear range in the rear. If you want to get real fancy, you might be able to set up a 1x3 by replacing a lot of the cogs on the rear cassette with spacers, but you'd have to find a derailleur with limits that could be set that close.

If what you're looking for is an urban, beat around town bike, then the internal geared hubs are great, but you don't want to start with a mtn bike. There are lots of urban/transportation/comfort bikes that might be better pre-built to what you want.

Tell us what you'll be using the bike for and we'll be able to give you better guidance.
Well, apparently I'm out of date! Lots of 3 speed hubs with disk brake:

http://www.shimano.com/publish/content/global_cycle/en/us/index/products/0/nexus/product.-code-SG-3D55.-type-..html

http://www.sram.com/sram/urban/products/i-motion-3-disc-brake

http://www.sturmey-archer.com/products/hubs/cid/8/id/59

Again, I've never seen something like this on an off road specific bike, but maybe it wouldn't so hard to do.

Im a DAV and have spent the last 20 years caring for my Parents. I have put on some extra pounds as a result and I need a good "Low Impact" form of exercise. I also just like the look of the 29er Mountain Bikes with a Suspension and I really like the disc brakes. These things were not even on the horizon when I last rode a bicycle ! My riding will be a mix of street and light trail. I do want the big tires and suspension for comfort and safety. I have found a 3 speed hub with disc brakes, I would really like to find a complete wheel, with spokes and hub already set up. My Grand Son likes to ride so I am determined to get the set-up I most feel comfortable with. Thank you so much for your reply . I am eager to hear more opinions and maybe some ideas ?
I attached a photo of a good 3 speed with disc brakes....I wish I could find a complete wheel assembly with this as the hub !

Sincerely,
jwill758
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#4
JW;

What you are wanting is not offered by any manufacturer ready to go.

Disc brakes on bikes except for downhill racers are an expensive marketing ploy, they offer no functionally benefits for on the street or light trail riding. They do offer some benefit if you ride through very deep mud.

Suspension is also another costly gimmick, that most people tire of quickly. My one suspension fork equipped bike is getting a rigid fork soon - the garage is supposed be finished next week Smile

The cheapest way to get what you want is to purchase the single speed you show in the picture, then build a new rear wheel with a suitable hub. If you can wait, the new wheel can be built with the rim from the bike you purchase, but you'll most likely need different length spokes. Here in San Jose, there are CL posters that will build wheels for $25 to $50 plus materials.

That said; I think that you'd be much happier in the long run with this:
http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/windsor/oxford_deluxe.htm
or this:
http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/windsor/kensington8.htm
The cr-mo frame and fork provide a comfortable ride, 32mm wide tires are plenty for everything except deep sand or mud. Our T50 has 35mm wide tires, and we are a 500+lbs team. I have no problem guiding on paths.
Nigel
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#5
I'm not as anti-disk & suspension as nfmisso is. But I will say that no suspension is better than CHEAP suspension. The higher end stuff works great. The cheap stuff just makes your bike heavy and handle badly.

I've found disk brakes are very powerful and much better in wet conditions than rim brakes. But for casual riding they can be overkill. They also have a bad habit of un-fixable squealing, be warned.

One other fact to remember is that converting to 3 speed will cost you some money: wheel build, shifter components, someone wiring up everything, etc. Nothing major, but if you're on a fixed budget, every dollar you spend on the conversion is a dollar you didn't spend on a better bike to start out with.

That all said...It's a cool idea and I think you should go for it if that's what you want. A few suggestions:
- go test ride some 29er Mtn bikes and some bikes with 3 spd set ups. Agressive mtn bikes do look and ride cool, but they have fairly twitchy handling and may not feel quite as friendly as a more transport oriented bike. How a bike rides will matter more than how it looks pretty quick.
- Remember that you'll need a hub with the same axle spacing as the frame and has to be able to take a compatible disk.
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#6
(06-13-2013, 07:49 PM)DaveM Wrote:  I'm not as anti-disk & suspension as nfmisso is. But I will say that no suspension is better than CHEAP suspension. The higher end stuff works great. The cheap stuff just makes your bike heavy and handle badly.

I've found disk brakes are very powerful and much better in wet conditions than rim brakes. But for casual riding they can be overkill. They also have a bad habit of un-fixable squealing, be warned.

One other fact to remember is that converting to 3 speed will cost you some money: wheel build, shifter components, someone wiring up everything, etc. Nothing major, but if you're on a fixed budget, every dollar you spend on the conversion is a dollar you didn't spend on a better bike to start out with.

That all said...It's a cool idea and I think you should go for it if that's what you want. A few suggestions:
- go test ride some 29er Mtn bikes and some bikes with 3 spd set ups. Agressive mtn bikes do look and ride cool, but they have fairly twitchy handling and may not feel quite as friendly as a more transport oriented bike. How a bike rides will matter more than how it looks pretty quick.
- Remember that you'll need a hub with the same axle spacing as the frame and has to be able to take a compatible disk.

Man o man ....you guys have definitely given me some food for thought. I have read that about disc brakes, the squeaking problem. While I'm not on an incredibly tight budget, it's not exactly unlimited either. I kinda set myself a budget of $700 for the bike, the helmet and lights or any other incidentals will be an added expenditure . FYI , I will also probably add a seat for more comfort.I imagine a lot of you are rolling your eyes back in your head. It's been a very long time since I've ridden a bike. I will probably make a mistake or two. DaveM, I think you are right about what looks cool will probably disappoint in the comfort zone. I really do appreciate all the opinions and advice. It means a lot to me that you guys put forth so much effort into giving me advice. If any of you come up with an idea or a place where I could purchase such a wheel , I would appreciate the help very much. Thanks a lot
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#7
That saddle looks PAINFUL !! If you have your saddle height adjusted to anywhere close to most efficient riding position, the insides of your legs will abrade on the the saddle, and it will HURT.

Check out the saddles on our tandem:
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/attachment.php?aid=3230

The saddle needs to match up with your sit bones (pelvis); too wide or too narrow and PAIN. The saddle I have for me on the T50 is my most comfortable, my other bikes are similar. I am 300+lbs. I learned about saddles from my dad decades ago. My wife went through a bit of a learning process for hers on our tandem. We tried more than half a dozen, before she settled on the one shown in the pictures. It is narrow, upward sloping front and rear, with a gel pad on top. The worst one was one similar to your picture, did not even go 100 feet .....

Definitely test ride a great deal.
Wheel purchase is going to run you quite a bit:
$100 to $200 for the hub
$30 to 80 for the rim
$20 to 60 for spokes and nipples
$25 to 60 for labor

$175 to $400 for the wheel depending.

Peter White builds wheels as good as anyone, read his website completely and carefully. He is a stickler. http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/
$700 - $175 = $525
you are definitely down into the realm of "CHEAP suspension"
Nigel
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#8
(06-13-2013, 10:56 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  That saddle looks PAINFUL !! If you have your saddle height adjusted to anywhere close to most efficient riding position, the insides of your legs will abrade on the the saddle, and it will HURT.

Check out the saddles on our tandem:
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/attachment.php?aid=3230

The saddle needs to match up with your sit bones (pelvis); too wide or too narrow and PAIN. The saddle I have for me on the T50 is my most comfortable, my other bikes are similar. I am 300+lbs. I learned about saddles from my dad decades ago. My wife went through a bit of a learning process for hers on our tandem. We tried more than half a dozen, before she settled on the one shown in the pictures. It is narrow, upward sloping front and rear, with a gel pad on top. The worst one was one similar to your picture, did not even go 100 feet .....

Definitely test ride a great deal.
Wheel purchase is going to run you quite a bit:
$100 to $200 for the hub
$30 to 80 for the rim
$20 to 60 for spokes and nipples
$25 to 60 for labor

$175 to $400 for the wheel depending.

Peter White builds wheels as good as anyone, read his website completely and carefully. He is a stickler. http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/
$700 - $175 = $525
you are definitely down into the realm of "CHEAP suspension"

Thanks for that info ! I said its been a long while since I've been on a bike. I see now I need to test out a few before I lay a penny out for a new bike. I will get a quality bike. I wont settle. Is there a bicycle review forum that I could read a lot before I try any rides ? I honestly dont know any of these brands out today. I recognize Schwinn and Huffy and thats about it. Im a 54 year old Grand Father and overweight. I damaged my legs and knees in the service so I need a low impact device like a bicycle. Thank you all for your help. Im pretty much decided on the 3 speed hub direction. Pretty much everything else is up for discussion. Of Course I want it too look sharp, but I want to be able to walk the day after. If I go with disc brakes, I will get the best I can afford. I like the fat tires and I want an alloy frame for light weight. There are trade offs with each decision , I will need help, advice. Thank a lot guys....
jwill758
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#9
JW;

I am a year younger than you; no grand kids, but my younger sister is a grandmother. I ride because it helps postpone my eventual knee replacement.

Aluminum framed bikes are not always lighter; i am some what opinionated as you can see above. I am a Mechanical Design Engineer, so I do know what I am talking about.

Bike shopping, I'll give you the same advice as I give others with limited knowledge:
1. visit all the bike shops in your area.
2. decide which one that you will want to deal with in the long term.
* NOTE the shop that will support you is far more important than the brand of the bike.
3. talk to them about what you want to do with your bike, where you are going to ride, how far, etc.
* your wants you describe do not match well with what you want to use the bike for, nor your budget.
4. test ride all of their suggestions, for at least a mile each.

All brands sold through reputable bike shops are of equal quality. Huffy and Schwinn are not considered quality brands; Specialized, Trek, Giant are examples of current mid range quality brands.

Most of us on this forum rebuild our own bikes. You can checkout some our rides here:
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/forum-36.html

For example the bike I commute 18 miles a day on now:
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-3167.html
My other commuter needs a new shifter cable (it is still ride able, but the cable will break soon), but I waiting for the garage to be finished, and a lot of other projects:
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-3036.html
I have three singles and one tandem in ride able condition, and two singles and one tandem that are project. All are derailleur equipped (or will be), all are steel frame, all have rim brakes, all have 36 or 40 spoke wheels, only one wheel has not been built by me.
JW - read EVERYTHING on Peter White's site. That will get you up to speed. The check out the websites of Trek, Giant, Specialized, Cannondale, Fiji.
Nigel
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#10
I really "want" your concept to work out because I love the idea of a full on mtn bike with a 3 speed on it. But I have to say I think you'll regret trying to build this on your budget. What you'll end up with is a low-level mtn bike, with crummy suspension, with a nice back wheel. Remeber that after accessories, you're talking about a $600 budget, which won't go that far if you spend 300 on a wheel, shifter, etc.

It seems to me that you have to decide between internal geared hub (IGH) and disk brakes. I'd go with IGH, but that's me.

This http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/jub_8.htm and this http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/cafe_express8.htm are pretty close to what you're talking about. The jubilee8 has suspension and the cafe_express does not. This is a good example of trade-offs. They're the same price. The one with suspension has slightly worse components because they have to make up for the higher cost of the fork. It will also be a bit heavier because of the fork. Between these two, I would go with the non-suspension version. Putting slightly bigger tires and letting 10 lbs. of air pressure out of them will give you just as much comfort as a lower end suspension fork and the better components will give you better braking, durability, etc.

You might also look at something like the T300 and T800 here: http://www.torkerusa.com/bikes/commute/2012-dually-2
These look much more like old-fashioned transport bikes. But they would be quite versatile. Obviously, you're not going to go off roading on them, but they would be great for smooth, packed dirt trails and then you could swing by the store on your way home, pick up a few things and pedal home.

On seats, nfmisso is very right. Those big old padded seats only work well on the old cruiser style bikes where you have the seat low and your knees are always bent. You don't want to ride like that for any distance or at any speed. Narrow doesn't make a seat less comfortable, one that fits you poorly does.

As you said, go try to test ride a few things. A lot of this stuff is personal preference and you may hate what I like, etc. If you get a bike from the internet, find a shop and pay them to assemble it. Ask them if it's possible to "tension and true" the wheels. It may cost a few extra bucks, but will make the wheels much more durable long term. (This really should be done on all bikes, but especially something you mail order.)

Don't stress too much. A lot of the differences we're talking about won't make a big difference anyway. Get something halfway decent and get out and start riding. You may find that what you want changes after a little while anyway.

good luck
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#11
Well, a little over $800 will get you extra wide, soft riding tires, upright riding position (for us out of shape old guys), pedals oriented forward for your knees, an 8 speed internal hub with roller brakes. Electra Townie 8i.
[Image: 185014_main.jpg]
A few hundred less will get you the 3 speed, coaster rear, linear pull front brake.
[Image: 181128_main.jpg]

I prefer 26" wheels & tires, in the bikes we've discussed it gets you wider rims, shorter spokes & a great selection of city/urban/cruiser tires.
These bikes are useless off road unless it's hard packed dirt, a short length of sand or gravel etc..The tires are the "shocks". I'm your age, and almost the same size as nfmisso. I like a more upright position than he does, he goes for a bit more sporty ride.
As for the seat, try what comes on the bike for 2 weeks before changing. The tail end of the seat needs to be up so only your "sit bones" ride the seat, just as previously stated. As an example, both of the bikes pictured would need the seat tilted down a tad at the front. It might take a while for you to get used to that.

Oh yeah, I forgot this one. I would get this if I could afford it ($800ish)
[Image: 181219_main.jpg]
Front shock, pull the fenders, add front or rear (or both) rack & baskets & you've got the perfect excuse to shop & get groceries etc.. When the rear tire wears out you can put an even softer, wider one on.
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#12
(06-13-2013, 03:38 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  JW;

What you are wanting is not offered by any manufacturer ready to go.
I searched long and hard to find a bike like he is describing myself. I wanted a bike to ride around the city/on campus that could take curbs and potholes without damage and I was tired of greasy hands from chains popping off the gears - derailur systems may have evolved a lot, but they're never perfect and have caused me a lot of pain and suffering to the point where I had grown sick and tired of them and desperately wanted an internal geared hub.
' Wrote:Disc brakes on bikes except for downhill racers are an expensive marketing ploy, they offer no functionally benefits for on the street or light trail riding.
WHOA stop right there! I nearly jumped out of my seat when I read that and it prompted me to register on the forum right away so I could respond - I vehemently disagree! I did not even get a drivers license until I was 23 years old because I was such an avid cyclist, I've ridden in all sorts of urban environments in all sorts of weather. It's a real pain to constantly "squeegee" off your brakes when riding a bicycle in the rain with "normal" brakes, but if you don't the added delay of trying to stop with wet rims can be deadly. It's also important to realize that narrow slick tires are quite good at sliding on wet roads if one tries to stop suddenly.

It was a real pain in the butt to setup a bike like I wanted - it seemed like the features I wanted were mutually exclusive: disc brakes, geared hub, reasonable cost, able to use moderately wide "city" tires and front suspension.
' Wrote:Suspension is also another costly gimmick, that most people tire of quickly. My one suspension fork equipped bike is getting a rigid fork soon - the garage is supposed be finished next week Smile
I got my first suspension fork a couple years ago. I still appreciate it whenever I'm not riding on smooth roads. I do still have an alternate bike, however: a pure road bike, the Trek "Elance". I like both (except when the derailure is a little out of alignment on the Trek).
' Wrote:The cheapest way to get what you want is to purchase the single speed you show in the picture, then build a new rear wheel with a suitable hub. If you can wait, the new wheel can be built with the rim from the bike you purchase, but you'll most likely need different length spokes. Here in San Jose, there are CL posters that will build wheels for $25 to $50 plus materials.
I would love to find someone who would convert a bike (with my supplied hub) to a geared hub system for $25 - $50...

Let me end by saying this: I cannot stress enough how much of an improvement [good] disc brakes are. Every time I use my new bike with disc brakes they put a grin on my face and sometimes I stop a few extra times just to appreciate them. I had to "build my own" bike to get what I wanted and it was a long and painful journy, but by spending a lot of my own time looking for bargains online, going to bike shops to find cheap "pulled parts" (typically I found pulled parts at around a 75% discount) and going to the local "bike co-op" to use some of their tools which I don't have at home I was able to build my bike for a few hundred dollars rather than the $1,000 or so I would have had to pay. Now, not only do I feel a lot safer riding in the rain, I'm also a lot more comfortable when the road is rough.
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#13
(07-10-2013, 01:46 PM)Christoph3r Wrote:  
(06-13-2013, 03:38 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  JW;

What you are wanting is not offered by any manufacturer ready to go.
I searched long and hard to find a bike like he is describing myself. I wanted a bike to ride around the city/on campus that could take curbs and potholes without damage and I was tired of greasy hands from chains popping off the gears - derailur systems may have evolved a lot, but they're never perfect and have caused me a lot of pain and suffering to the point where I had grown sick and tired of them and desperately wanted an internal geared hub.
' Wrote:Disc brakes on bikes except for downhill racers are an expensive marketing ploy, they offer no functionally benefits for on the street or light trail riding.
WHOA stop right there! I nearly jumped out of my seat when I read that and it prompted me to register on the forum right away so I could respond - I vehemently disagree! I did not even get a drivers license until I was 23 years old because I was such an avid cyclist, I've ridden in all sorts of urban environments in all sorts of weather. It's a real pain to constantly "squeegee" off your brakes when riding a bicycle in the rain with "normal" brakes, but if you don't the added delay of trying to stop with wet rims can be deadly. It's also important to realize that narrow slick tires are quite good at sliding on wet roads if one tries to stop suddenly.

It was a real pain in the butt to setup a bike like I wanted - it seemed like the features I wanted were mutually exclusive: disc brakes, geared hub, reasonable cost, able to use moderately wide "city" tires and front suspension.
' Wrote:Suspension is also another costly gimmick, that most people tire of quickly. My one suspension fork equipped bike is getting a rigid fork soon - the garage is supposed be finished next week Smile
I got my first suspension fork a couple years ago. I still appreciate it whenever I'm not riding on smooth roads. I do still have an alternate bike, however: a pure road bike, the Trek "Elance". I like both (except when the derailure is a little out of alignment on the Trek).
' Wrote:The cheapest way to get what you want is to purchase the single speed you show in the picture, then build a new rear wheel with a suitable hub. If you can wait, the new wheel can be built with the rim from the bike you purchase, but you'll most likely need different length spokes. Here in San Jose, there are CL posters that will build wheels for $25 to $50 plus materials.
I would love to find someone who would convert a bike (with my supplied hub) to a geared hub system for $25 - $50...

Let me end by saying this: I cannot stress enough how much of an improvement [good] disc brakes are. Every time I use my new bike with disc brakes they put a grin on my face and sometimes I stop a few extra times just to appreciate them. I had to "build my own" bike to get what I wanted and it was a long and painful journy, but by spending a lot of my own time looking for bargains online, going to bike shops to find cheap "pulled parts" (typically I found pulled parts at around a 75% discount) and going to the local "bike co-op" to use some of their tools which I don't have at home I was able to build my bike for a few hundred dollars rather than the $1,000 or so I would have had to pay. Now, not only do I feel a lot safer riding in the rain, I'm also a lot more comfortable when the road is rough.

Opinions are fine and often are given with a genuine interest in helping someone. You offered me EXPERIENCE in the exact project I was attempting to start. I appreciate that. Im still looking and finding the exact bike is not possible, however , my tastes might have been changed just by reading and searching through so many bike forums. I did see the perfect I want and it was on TV. The worlds most beautiful and technically perfect electric bike ! Cost ? $80,000.00 . Some things just were not meant to be ! ;-) .
I will do as you did . Buy what I want as close as I can get and then add what isn't there as I can afford it or find who can do it (Hub building isn't within my field if capabilities). Thank you all so much for these wonderful replies. I will post a short note and photos when I have my version of perfect.
Sincerely,
jwill758
Christophr3r,
Thanks so much for going through the trouble of registering just to help me out, Thank you very much !
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#14
Interesting find 1FJ

I have no issues with cassettes so I prefer them although some internal hubs for city bikes offer simplicity for riding. Probably good reliability too.

You can buy the single speed and build it up , that would be unique if you ride other bikes and decide that that is rally the best for you. You cannot pick a bike from a picture until you have experience in what works for you. Disc brakes add weight and maintenance esp hydraulic which are the best. IMO gimmick. ANND while the wheel may fit you still need brackets for mounting the caliper. I do not ride in the rain so that advantage does not interest me.

I like the Town bikes Nigel found for easy city riding. IMO if you like the big wheel concept consider a mountain bike, but they are more work in the city. Do not buy a cheap one, your budget begins the line. They are stronger than road bikes. But if you stay on pavement the road bike is better. Do not be sold on gimmicks buy simple but good quality especially the frame and wheels.

AS per seats, ye everyone thinks a big plushy sit is the way to go for comfort. I had one with gel. It just spreads your weight and puts pressure on nerves resulting in the dreaded numb nuts feeling.

I found this seat an eye opener works great for me, a good seat supports you in the right spots under the hip bones. Not all fit the same seat. I guess I got lucky.There are general sizes that work for many.

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_522820_-1___

Its getting harder to have it your way, my Canon Powershoot A630 lost a flash and none of the replacements have what I liked about it, may have it fixed, or compromise......Seems to always be the case when you find something you like.
Never Give Up!!!
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#15
(07-10-2013, 06:58 PM)GeorgeET Wrote:  Its getting harder to have it your way, my Canon Powershoot A630 lost a flash and none of the replacements have what I liked about it, may have it fixed, or compromise......Seems to always be the case when you find something you like.
AGREED! I now buy duplicates of the things I really like, if I can afford it!
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#16
You can buy a decent bike with a geared hub, fenders, "comfort" position upright handlebars for $175!

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_536788_-1

[Image: YB-GRCG-BL.jpg]

But... to get that same bike with decent quality disc brakes on it? If it is even possible, it would cost what, $600 more?

If you are not planing on riding in the rain, and not planing on riding very fast, then you don't really need disc brakes - I just maybe over-reacted a bit when the other guy said they are "only a gimmick".

I should also mention WHICH disc brake system I have - remarkably, the same eBay seller has the exact setup for sale for an even lower price now (this is a very good deal for very good brakes, btw):

http://www.ebay.com/itm/2012-Avid-BB7-Disc-Brake-Calipers-G3-rotors-Front-Rear-/330594346925?ssPageName=ADME:L:OC:US:1123

[attachment=4294]

You could try to find a good deal on a suspension fork with a disc brake mount. The hardest part for me was finding the right FRAME which had the disc brake mount on the rear. I had had the same bike since the late 1980's and similar to you, I hadn't even known about disc brakes until I looked into getting a new bike more suited to an older person (me) than my sleek thin-tired Trek road bike.

I had been riding around school in the rain and needed to stop suddenly, I was not able to so I had to veer off the sidewalk to avoid some pedestrians. I ended up taking a spill and my shoulder/arm hurt for a week (luckily I did not break any bones!). It was after that that I became determined to get wider tires with a grippier tread and the disc brakes.

With disc brakes I can simply, and easily, apply as much stopping power as the tires have traction on the road - much more stopping power than my rubber pad brakes had on wet aluminum rims.

Also let me elaborate on the problems I had with gear cassette derailleur systems: on my first mountain bike which I also got in the late 1980's it came with the higher end Shimano "Deore LX" front and rear derailleur, which, for some unknown reason never worked quite right. I took it back to the bike shop where I bought the bike multiple times for adjustments but it would keep slipping gears, or not shift smoothly. Then one day the chain popped right off the rear cogs while I was standing to peddle to get up to speed faster. When that happened I flew off my bike and landed chest first on the sharp corner of a steel I-beam causing a "sucking chest wound". Aside from that, over the years I've felt much frustration with having to stop at the side of the road to put the chain back on ending up with filthy greasy dirty hands on the way to work, or wherever it was I happened to be heading.
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#17
(07-10-2013, 07:30 PM)1FJEF Wrote:  AGREED! I now buy duplicates of the things I really like, if I can afford it!
I have a Skil 6425 3/8" hammer drill that I bought 30 years ago - works great, accept that I misplaced the chuck key, and I have not been successful in finding a replacement that fits - of course the key has been discontinued, but you can still get replacements for just about everything else, including the chuck........
Nigel
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#18
I thought I'd update since I have got myself a bike now. I didn't end up with what I thought I wanted. I did find exactly what I had described at the beginning , this ( http://mikesbikes.com/product/13raleigh-misceo-trail-i11-174087-1.htm ), but it's not what I bought. I bought this ( http://nicasionakamine.com/blog/?p=94 ). This review is not my own, its the bike I purchased is what I was showing. I bought it used , but its brand new, just hasn't been ridden, even though it's a 2010 model. I love it. If I had more money, I would have bought the Raleigh Misceo Trail i11. In my opinion , it's worth the extra $600.00 . Anyway, I will post more photos and such as I get more experience. Whoever said "It's like riding a bike, you never forget" had never ridden a bike or stopped riding for 45 years then started again. I felt like a 5 year old kid riding without training wheels for the first time ! Im better now and Im loving every minute ! More later....
John
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#19
Alfine geared hub, belt drive with guard, excellent lighting system. That is one gorgeous piece of machinery.
[Image: bike-1024x764.jpg]
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#20
Sweet! Not my style of rolling, but a very nice bike - no nonsense, classic lines, good lights. Now if you could just find a saddle bag that matches the saddle that would be even more awesome!
(I'd probably also invest in better, bigger pedals, though. The simple nylon ones are too small for me)
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