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We can rebuild him...the life and death of the red herring
#1
I bought a beautiful old carbon fiber bike off of eBay and have ridden many good miles on it. I call it the Red Herring. It is the Aegis Aro Svelte (aegisbicycles.com/arosvelte.html‎), model year circa 1998 (?). While I was riding around Manhattan recently, the frame broke where it connects to the rear axle. It is not the carbon fiber that broke but a small attachment that sticks out of the carbon fiber and connects to the wheel axle. This piece is a different type of metal. I am not an expert but I think it's aluminum. It is the same as this frame from another Aegis model: http://www.pbase.com/headmaster/aegis_bike&page=all).

You can see the break on my bike in the attached pictures.

I took my bike to the store assuming it would be an easy fix involving some welding, but they told me the whole bike is totaled. I am heartbroken. This bike means everything to me and I cannot afford to buy another bike before my next triathlon. Does anyone know where or how I might get this fixed?

Thanks very much,
John
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#2
That frame is toasted... they told you right. Actually your lucky the breakage did not injure you.. count yourself lucky in that regard.

Carbon bikes are accidents waiting to happen. Many of those incidents mean serious injury. When carbon forks go.. it's usually NOW. Your on your face.. or worse.
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#3
Hi John;

The frame is scrap. When the frame was built, the carbon was wrapped around the aluminum dropout, which cannot be removed without destroying the carbon. Any attempt to weld the aluminum will also destroy the carbon.

I would suggest contacting the manufacturer to ask about a replacement frame, and/or look at other frames and swap the components to the other frame.
Nigel
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#4
(11-19-2013, 04:59 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  Hi John;

The frame is scrap. When the frame was built, the carbon was wrapped around the aluminum dropout, which cannot be removed without destroying the carbon. Any attempt to weld the aluminum will also destroy the carbon.

I would suggest contacting the manufacturer to ask about a replacement frame, and/or look at other frames and swap the components to the other frame.

See 'OLD' via frame description. Warranty... isn't gonna happen. Then it's likely a resold bike.. nothing to the 2nd owner.

Stepping onto the dark side.. some could repair it. After all.. carbon is just glue mixed with fibers. Some creative types could pull it off.. at what cost who knows. HAVE to be someone experienced with these repairs. After all.. the insert was once glued to that frame.

NOT advisable >>>IMO. Safety is first riding<<<<<<<<<<<.
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#5
Hard to tell from the pics, would like to see some clearer pics of the the lug drop edge and what the carbon tube looks like. If the frame is toast by most then what are out by trying a repair and easy test riding. For a low cost possible remedy try axe handle epoxy. clean the inside of the tube with a wire brush (gently) clean/sand the lug.
If there is enough room in the stay and enough flex that you could drill and screw a screw partway in the lug and still slip into place that would help too. insert a piece of sponge in the tube to hold the epoxy and smear it on the lug and drizzle in the stay,put together and strap it tight to hold till it sets. wipe off excess. leave alone for a day or two to set. test ride carefully and see what goes. works great for metal axes and fiberglass handles that take a hell of a beating.
http://www.amazon.com/Ames-True-Temper-3010600-Fiberglass/dp/B002JGC9SY/ref=pd_sim_sbs_lg_1
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#6
"could drill and screw a screw partway in the lug"

Suggest.. a hole alone in that lug enough. Glue will fill it and add to the 'hold'.

Surface prep per the bonding agent's directions.. the main issue.
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#7
(11-20-2013, 02:20 AM)painkiller Wrote:  ... then what are out by trying a repair and easy test riding.

I think what he would be out on with this is that it may hold fine for a few minutes of "easy riding" and then snap when going around a hard corner, hitting a bump, or some other event that could result in a bad crash.

For a frame break, the rear dropout is probably the best place to have it break safety wise. But you can't know what other areas of the frame are also near failure, nor can you know if the stress of that initial break caused cracks/weakness in other areas as well. Even if you fix the dropout, the whole frame could have been weakened.

I'm not saying the frame couldn't be repaired somehow and I'm not one of those "carbon frames are deadly" types. But I wouldn't ride this frame ever again.
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#8
I did not start out as a carbon basher.... but after doing some extensive searching.. I was a convert. Carbon is typical 'modern day' nonsense... cheep to make & sold to a gullible public who does not weigh out the consequences of the material's failure. That failure more often than not is NOW.. click.. and your down. And the failure rate is something bike marketing people won't discuss much.. in any meaningful way. Then you in the hospital.... or worse.. who do you litigate?

This broken frame scenario has been played out thousands of times. Fortunately those owners usually has sense enough to junk them.
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#9
I certainly agree that the frame has met its demise, it should never be sold to be ridden again. Welcome to the world of carbon fiber bicycles. Fine if you had a sponsor to toss you another when it breaks or have a thick dime. I am just saying if you felt like dinking with it for 10 bucks to check it out and are willing to pay the price, well up to you. Who knows, the frame could have been mended before you got it. Just don't do someone else the favor. Wall art is nice too! "All good things come to an end" sometimes!
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#10
I am a big fan of CroMo Smile

Though I admit to having some hi-ten frames and one 531.
Nigel
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