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Upgrading this bike
#1
I was wondering if you could recommend anything you would change on this bike? I was thinking of maybe changing the forks and handle bars? I heard it was worth it converting it to thread less so I'll just leave it as it is and get replacements that fit, and because it;s a cheap full suspension the frame weighs a ton.thanks!

http://s39.photobucket.com/
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#2
Link is requesting a login and password
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#3
(02-22-2014, 11:03 PM)RBurrelli Wrote:  Link is requesting a login and password


lol sorry this should work. http://s39.photobucket.com/user/danielblackwell2788/media/Fronthandlebarspic_zps4177bf76.jpg.html?sort=3&o=1
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#4
(02-22-2014, 01:53 PM)Blackwell1988 Wrote:  I was wondering if you could recommend anything you would change on this bike? I was thinking of maybe changing the forks and handle bars? I heard it was worth it converting it to thread less so I'll just leave it as it is and get replacements that fit, and because it's a cheap full suspension the frame weighs a ton.thanks!

http://s39.photobucket.com/

It's best to make sure you have a bike you will be happy with before you purchase, as upgrading later is always much more expensive than buying an equivalent bike in the first place. Converting to a rigid threadless system will save a few pounds, which you will not notice unless carrying the bike up a flight of stairs, and a different suspension fork will save very little weight

To convert to threadless you will have to find a rigid fork that provides the same geometry for the frame as the current one, and that alone can be a challenge. You will also need a compatible headset. The fork/headset diameter where it goes through the frame must be compatible. The fork column must be properly cut to size, and afterward will not allow much up and down adjustment (which must be done by removing the stem and then moving spacers). The stem must be compatible with the fork diameter, of the proper length for comfort and the proper clamp size for your handlebars.

Finally the brake calipers will have to be moved over from the old fork and adjusted properly. If you were able to do all the work yourself the cost would be a minimum of $60, possibly more like $80. To have a shop do it would easily exceed $100. The same handlebars should be able to be used, but changing them would add to the price.

You will likely spend much more time doing such an upgrade as you did choosing the bike. I would also note that it appears both brake housings on your bike are too short, and the rear shift housing is possibly too long. You may find you are unhappy with other aspects of the bike as time goes on (no way to tell) which would further add to the expense or negate the benefit of the fork change.

If the bike is very new you might consider returning it if that option is available and purchasing a bike with which you will be happier.
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#5
Okay thanks for the reply cny-man I don't think I will convert it to threadless, I'm new to bikes and sounds way to complicated for me! I am happy with the bike to be honest, I just wanted to customize it by changing the forks and handlebars, obviously with compatible ones. Would the forks still need to be cut to size!I definitely couldn't do that myself, wouldn't have a clue.

I've had such a big issue with the brakes, I've finally got it so the pads don't rub against the wheel and retract properly. How long should the housing be on the front and back? that always confuses me hence why they are probably too short. The rear derailleur doesn't shift properly either so I'm trying to fix that, not sure if I have to replace the shifter cable!hope not. Thanks for your reply man
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#6
Unless you purchased the bike mail order the merchant is responsible for proper adjustment, sizing of cables, etc. for a period of time after the sale. If you purchased mail order you should not change any housing or cables lengths without proper guidance. I think you need some in-person assistance - a knowledgeable friend or a bike co-op. Once housing is cut too short you need to purchase new.
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#7
Hi Blackwell;

"How long should the housing be...?" The answer is always: it depends. Every bike/situation is a bit different. I always cut the housing to length for each situation, I make sure that I do not cut it too short to start, because it is easy to shorten and impossible to lengthen. I leave the cables very long, until everything is checked out - winding the excess into a loop for the test ride before cutting to final length and capping.

After ruining a nice diagonal cutter; I purchased a proper cutter for high grade steel cable - much cleaner cuts and the right tool for the job. Skimping on the right tool for cutting cable is expensive.

Cables and housing are very inexpensive; many times it is best to scrap what is there and start over. On project bikes, the first thing we do is cut and trash all the cables and housings.
Nigel
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#8
CNY-man, the bike is not new it's nearly two years old! I can replace the cables myself okay it was just the housing length that confuses me. Yes Niglel I think I will purchase a decent pair of cutters, I've spent a lot of cheap ones and they just continuously frey the cable. I've been using diagonal side cutters. I've realized now I need to replace the shifter cable for the rear derailleur, they're gripshifts, do you ever use this type of gear system? thanks
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#9
(02-23-2014, 10:28 PM)Blackwell1988 Wrote:  ..... they're gripshifts, do you ever use this type of gear system? thanks
Yes; I have SRAM MRX on my World Tourist, my SR and my GT and SRAM X.0 on our T50. The cable is extremely easy to replace.

Here is are instructions: http://bicycletutor.com/grip-shift-cable/

Membership to this site is a bargain and the videos are excellent.
Nigel
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#10
Okay thanks again
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#11
(02-24-2014, 02:11 AM)nfmisso Wrote:  
(02-23-2014, 10:28 PM)Blackwell1988 Wrote:  ..... they're gripshifts, do you ever use this type of gear system? thanks
Yes; I have SRAM MRX on my World Tourist, my SR and my GT and SRAM X.0 on our T50. The cable is extremely easy to replace.

Here is are instructions: http://bicycletutor.com/grip-shift-cable/

Membership to this site is a bargain and the videos are excellent.

I have Microshift 6 speed shifters, what's the difference between these and yours? thanks. Daniel
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#12
(02-26-2014, 11:26 AM)Blackwell1988 Wrote:  I have Microshift 6 speed shifters, what's the difference between these and yours? thanks. Daniel

Hi Daniel;
Practically no difference when it comes to cable replacement.

On some, you can replace the cable without removing the shifter from the handle bars. First shift to the highest gear; disconnect the cable from the derailleur, pull the housing(s) off, and push the cable back into the shifter. You should be able to see the end of the cable roughly opposite of where the housing goes into the shifter.
Nigel
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