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Which rim can I order??
#1
Hi!

I'm looking to order a new front rim online to save a few bucks but it's a little difficult to choose the correct size. Ideally, I'd like to order the same size rim, or at least one for which I can still use the old tube and tire.

Rim size: 622 x 17

Tire: 700 x 35c

From my research online, I know 622mm is a standard/common rim size, and 17mm is the inner width of the rim. For the tire, the x35 refers to the size of the tire when fully inflated. Is this correct?? Also, from Sheldon Brown's awesome website, there's a handy table that says that for my tire width (ie 35mm) I can only use rims with a width of 17mm or 19mm. And yet, my online readings have said that while many people bike with tires of differing widths, it's the rear tire that will usually be wider, for comfort's sake. And therefore, I suppose, I should avoid having a wider front tire, but will a millimeter or two really make much of a difference...?

So all that said, I've been looking on ebay and Amazon and have found some rims I was hoping someone wiser than me could look at. I suppose my confusion in all this comes from the fact that often on these sites the rim is described by the tire size, eg 700 x 35, and I'm aware that sometimes the rim width is not recorded accurately. I'm just super worried I'll order the wrong rim! And I don't drive, so not having a bike is a little inconvenient at the moment! So here's the rims, and thank you for taking a look!

One: 700 x 35

Two: Inside rim width: 18.4mm

Three: Inside rim width: 19mm

Four: 36H?

Five: also 19mm



In my mind, cheapest = best as I plan to buy a super awesome bike later this year, perhaps end of summer. But if it's worth it to spend a few extra bucks on a better-sized rim, so be it I guess? But if you think I could 'get away' with the cheapest option, please tell me! :-) Some other questions I have: will the number of spokes matter? My bike's just a hybrid, used strictly for city/mild trail cycling. And also, I'm aware that some rims don't come with tape, but I've read (on this forum) that tape can be reused from old rims so I'm hoping that answers that problem! Also electrical and duct tape were suggested, so I'm not too worried!

Thank you so much for taking the time to look at this, I feel a little like a dunce having to ask these questions because really, everything's answered (five times over) online, but better safe than sorry I guess! Thanks again and have a great day! :-)

"When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments. Here was a machine of precision and balance for the convenience of man. And (unlike subsequent inventions for man's convenience) the more he used it, the fitter his body became. Here, for once, was a product of man's brain that was entirely beneficial to those who used it, and of no harm or irritation to others. Progress should have stopped when man invented the bicycle." -Elizabeth West

"Whenever I see an adult on a bicycle, I have hope for the human race." -HG Wells
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#2
First you need to not do an apple and oranges comparison. All the WHEELS (the rim is the outer band of metal only) should be compared by the inside width of the rim. If you find one that does not have that spec and you want to consider it then call the provider or do a Google search of the model rim that comes on the wheel to determine that dimension.

Secondly you need to make sure the width of the hub between locknuts is the same as your bike. It's called axle spacing, over locknut distance (OLD), etc. For a front wheel it will be in the 100mm range. Again, if that spec isn't noted you need to find out what it is. Price is up to you - large differences will normally get you a wheel whose hub is smoother and rim stronger or nicer looking, but proper tension on the wheel is more important than the rim.

Thirdly, Sheldon gives a recommended range for rim vs. tire width, but does not say you cannot vary from it.

Finally - no a mm or so in tire width does not matter, and if you already have the tires it's not a concern anyway. Some people like a larger front tire to better absorb shocks.
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#3
Hi Daisy;

The links you provided are to wheels, not rims. So we are assuming that you want a front wheel not a rim: http://www.amazon.com/Sun-Alloy-700c-CR18-Black/dp/B000WY77GY/

Do you want to re-use the inner tubes that you have? Rims (wheels) accept tubes with Presta OR Schraeder valves.

Does your bike have disc or rim brakes? If disc, what kind of mounting: Shimano center lock or 6 bolt?

If your bike has rim brakes and you want to use tubes equipped with Schraeder valves, these will work fine:
http://www.amazon.com/Alex-AP-18-Front-Road-Wheel/dp/B0043MU95C/
http://www.amazon.com/Alex-Toys-Alloy-Front-Silver/dp/B000J0GQVS/
http://www.amazon.com/Sta-Tru-Alex-Front-Wheel-700X35/dp/B004YJ2LK0/

Any low-end wheel (<$200- each) will probably need some truing, tensioning and stress relief.
Nigel
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#4
Also if you are lookign just for a front wheel, some bike shops have a pile of old but still usable ones lying around. They will definitely need some truing and tensioning, though.
What is wrong with the old wheel? What broke?
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#5
Hi cny-man,

Thanks for the clarification of wheel v rim! I've been biking for almost a decade, but sometimes my own ignorance shocks me. :-P So I take it from what you're saying that none of the wheels I found are suitable?? Also thanks of the OLD note, I hadn't come across that in my readings. :-)

Hi nfmisso!

Yes, I want to re-use the inner tube that I currently have, also, I should have clarified this, but I have Presta valves and rim brakes. But thank you so much for looking up those wheels and for all your answers!! Just out of curiosity, how can you tell those Amazon wheels are Schraeder, I don't see it specified in the description? Those wheels are so cheap though, I suppose I could just buy a Schraeder tube, my pump can work with both in theory. Another thing, in the second link, the comments, William K says:

"IF you need a cheap replacement wheel and are not "abusive", these will work.
IF you know how to work on wheels, you can make them MUCH better.
IF neither, look for a wheel with a double wall rim, such as a Sun Rims CR 18 for about twice the price."

Except Amazon doesn't appear to have such wheels! Ah well, I've put my bike through a lot of "abuse" unfortunately (in that I ride it a lot and do not do nearly enough maintenance), but for the next half year I think such a rim could last even my uses. :-)

And frankly, what you say about needing to true/etc a cheap wheel worries me, I mean, I'm planning on buying a new bike this year and so I'm not exactly keen on investing more money in my current one ya know? But even spending $30 on a cheap wheel and $25 to have it trued will still be cheaper than buying an expensive wheel that's good to go I guess. Thanks again for all your efforts!!

Hi Joe_W,

That's a good thought about the old wheels at the bike shops! Perhaps if the internet fails me I will consult them. :-) As for the old wheel, part of it just kinda split? Like this. So it's totally my fault, should've been better about changing the brake pads, and also a few days prior I really did a lot of damage to everything I think by biking through snow/the mother of all slush days. I'm really looking forward to having a new bike, this time doing everything 'right'! :-)
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#6
A cracked through the braking surface is normal wear with rim brakes - similar thing happened on our tandem. Depending on many factors, it will happen anywhere from a few hundred to tens of thousands of miles. Rims are a replacement item, like brake pads, though rims should last through many sets of brake pads - but not if sand or similar gets imbedded in the brake pads.
Nigel
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#7
(03-19-2014, 05:33 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  A cracked through the braking surface is normal wear with rim brakes - similar thing happened on our tandem. Depending on many factors, it will happen anywhere from a few hundred to tens of thousands of miles. Rims are a replacement item, like brake pads, though rims should last through many sets of brake pads - but not if sand or similar gets imbedded in the brake pads.

Glad to hear I'm less to blame than I suspected, and like I said, I think the slush really did a number on my bike, the wheel especially as the gritty slush would just fill up my brakes, by the end of the day I couldn't even brake anymore, it was an um interesting day to be sure!

I think I will just buy one of your suggested rims and also a new Schraeder tube. As per cny-man's suggestion I will first verify the axle spacing. When I can be bothered to work on my bike, I hafta say, I quite enjoy it, most certainly I enjoy learning new things about how it works. So now I know about wheels and rims and axle spacing! Which is nice. :-) So thanks to everyone for their input!
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