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Schwinn Breeze with Bendix brake question
#1
I bought a Schwinn Deluxe Breeze and tried it out, back pedaled and bike braked quickly (maybe a 1/4 rotation) and firmly. Took it for a ride later and about 3 times I pedaled back 3-4 complete rotations and a time or 2 it never did brake.

When walking up a steep hill I noticed the pedals turning with the chain. A bit later pedals remained stationery when walking it.

This is what I've found when researching: 1960-65. There is a serial #
It has a Bendix automatic red band brake - no kickback
I read the arm has to be in proper place with the cone to work correctly but couldn't figure out where cone was. It looks like the arm has a hole that is hooked on - didn't see any cone shaped parts.
Supposedly I can use hammer to get the arm into correct position with a hammer. Problem is I don't know what position IS correct.
If I can fix it relatively easily, I will. If I have to tear it apart and rebuild I doubt my ability to do it right.

I am not bike savvy. Does anyone know how much you should need to back pedal if its working correctly? I don't know if this is a bike problem or I'm not doing it correctly. I did read brakes are meant to kick on in low gear - the times it didn't brake I was riding faster. Even slower riding though, I never did get the quick brake reaction I got in the test ride.

I'd really like to keep it but 3-4 rotations would be too much if that's how these brakes work.
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#2
Checked more and could be yellow band with disc brakes
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#3
Most of us have limited to no knowledge of coaster brakes. And consider a coaster brake alone unsafe on any bicycle.

The lack of pictures means little or no suggestions can be provided.

Keep hammers away for bicycles.

See also:
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-5146.html
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-5111.html
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-2829.html
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-5637.html
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-688.html
http://forums.bicycletutor.com/thread-4521.html
Nigel
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#4
Going back to my childhood memory of my bikes, which all had coaster brakes. The lever was attached to the chain stay with a metal band that twenty through a hole in the lever. It would be in a position under the chain stay.

Coaster brakes worked fine back then. You could feather them while braking or really stop quickly if needed.
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#5
(07-14-2014, 09:42 PM)RBurrelli Wrote:  Coaster brakes worked fine back then. You could feather them while braking or really stop quickly if needed.
Yeah, but back in our childhood we were under 80lbs, I used to have a blast with coaster brakes, long downhill skids. I couldn't imagine a coaster brake handling my fat arse for more than a few months.
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#6
It may be that the bearing on the hub is adjusted a bit too tight. There's no such thing as a "correct position for the arm." The first step is to adjust the hub bearing - check Nigel's links or Google "adjust bendix hub" Once that is done slide the axle into the dropouts. Rotate the hub until the brake arm is lined up with the retaining band on the chain stay. Insert the bolt and turn on the nut a few turns. Pull back lightly on the wheel so that it is centered and tighten the right axle nut. Center the wheel and tighten the left axle nut. Turn the pedals and readjust the rear wheel position so that at the chain's tightest position it still has a slight amount of play, and the wheel is centered. Finally, tighten the retaining band/nut for the brake arm. IF there is still a problem the hub needs to be overhauled.
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#7
Wanted to thank you all for your help. I replied yesterday but apparently deleted.

I will check the links, thank you.

My dd has a new bike with coasters and it works fine, just as strong and quick a response as I remember from my younger days. The Breeze is older but I think that shouldn't make a difference if its working correctly. Having 3-4 full rotations and still maybe not stopping makes me think prior owner put up with it instead of repairing.

The chain, hub, etc are all very clean, no rust. Might need more grease, seems dry looking.
Cny-man I appreciate the info. I've never done any work on any style bike so I'm working on figuring out your description which seems clear and probably would be to someone more experienced. it's what I would like to try. rebuilding hub though would be beyond me.
Trying to get pictures again to re-post
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#8
The hub should be rebuilt based on the symptoms. Although it was a single speed "red band" I rebuilt my first coaster hub when I was about 11 years old with no assistance - no repair books, no Internet, just a dad willing to grind down a wrench for the cone. Just find some good online instructions (look at written ones first, then videos for additional guidance) and dive in, but if you're not comfortable doing so find an old-school mechanic who is familiar with the hub.
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#9
[attachment=5244]
[attachment=5245]
[attachment=5246]
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#10
I don't know why images are so big instead of thumbnails. Sorry about that
Not as clean as I thought. Was very hard to turn bolts to adjust seat and handlebars.
cny-man. You have a point
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#11
Note: I revised my previous post - noticed you said OH is beyond your comfort zone - always good to be aware of your limits.
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#12
If you can back pedal 3-4 rotations without anything happening, something is wrong inside the hub and I wouldn't ride it. I doubt it's just a matter of needing grease as mechanically you shouldn't be able to back pedal any coaster brake that far. Luckily, coaster's are pretty simple to work on...
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