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First time rebuild
#1
Hello All,
My 2006 Trek 4300 went swimming during hurricane Sandy and many of the components have seized up. The frame is in good shape, but everything else is shot, so I would like to pretty much tear it down an replace every component. I have no doubt that a complete overhaul will easily cost double the bike's value and I have no problem with that. My issue is: I cannot find info regarding what replacement components will fit the bike nor can I find a service manual. Any assistance will be most appreciated.

Regards,
John

[attachment=5411]
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#2
it looks decent in the picture. first I have to ask if the front end setup is just as it was when you were riding it last? it looks to me as if you are operating the fork and brakes backwards, who assembled the bike if this is the case?. depending on just exactly is junk on this bike at the moment, you may want to reconsider the thought of money is not a problem. I did a 4300 last year that was involved in a car accident that involved just about everything except, fork, one wheel, stem. the came to about $380 and the labor was traded for helping me move.
If the bike was insured then find another bike and sell that one as is. It is just not about all the parts you need but also the amount of tools you will need to perform the task, plus the skills involved.
If it is still a go, here it is. first gut the frame, check bag and tag every part,next inspect each part to see if it can be saved or not. you might be better off to buy another wheelset for the proper speeds you have. that level of bike I would go with Shimano Alivio components, derailleurs,crankset/BB,shifters, Suntour fork, disc brakes of your choice. Not much to it just $$$. The list you seek does not exist and is not needed. now you can upgrade and build to suit, a blank slate as it were. measure your seat tube for fit of the new derailleur, buy the speced BB for the new crank, pic the gearing you want it and the new rear cluster, buy a nice chain, KmC or sram with a quik/missing link. and the tools needed for each task. take closeup picks of your BB area and we can tell you what tools you need. If doing the work your self like for fork repacement you might consider a saw guide for a good cut. we can show you how to make a cup press. once you think you have a list of what you need, let me know and I can help you spec components and tools.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#3
(10-19-2014, 06:20 PM)painkiller Wrote:  it looks decent in the picture. first I have to ask if the front end setup is just as it was when you were riding it last? it looks to me as if you are operating the fork and brakes backwards, who assembled the bike if this is the case?. depending on just exactly is junk on this bike at the moment, you may want to reconsider the thought of money is not a problem. I did a 4300 last year that was involved in a car accident that involved just about everything except, fork, one wheel, stem. the came to about $380 and the labor was traded for helping me move.
If the bike was insured then find another bike and sell that one as is. It is just not about all the parts you need but also the amount of tools you will need to perform the task, plus the skills involved.
If it is still a go, here it is. first gut the frame, check bag and tag every part,next inspect each part to see if it can be saved or not. you might be better off to buy another wheelset for the proper speeds you have. that level of bike I would go with Shimano Alivio components, derailleurs,crankset/BB,shifters, Suntour fork, disc brakes of your choice. Not much to it just $$$. The list you seek does not exist and is not needed. now you can upgrade and build to suit, a blank slate as it were. measure your seat tube for fit of the new derailleur, buy the speced BB for the new crank, pic the gearing you want it and the new rear cluster, buy a nice chain, KmC or sram with a quik/missing link. and the tools needed for each task. take closeup picks of your BB area and we can tell you what tools you need. If doing the work your self like for fork repacement you might consider a saw guide for a good cut. we can show you how to make a cup press. once you think you have a list of what you need, let me know and I can help you spec components and tools.

The front end is twisted around as my father had to make parallel the wheel and handle bars to get it in his SUV when he brought it to my home from his. It has never been ridden this way. It definitely needs a wheel set. The salt water corrosion has warped the wheels and caused the spokes to start popping off. One of my issues, however, is figuring out what spec wheels I need. I know that they are 26" wheels, but for example, the spacing; what spacing is being referred to when you look up wheel specs? Not to mention, I don't know how to find the specs of my current wheels (or any of the other components on the bike for that matter). Alivio components sound good. My current Suntour forks are rated at 80 mm of travel. Can I use forks with 100 or 120 mm of travel? The stock setup is 8-speed. Can that be increased to 9 or 10? I am not familiar with the acronym "BB," so please clarify. I do intend to do the work myself, but I didn't realize that the forks need to be cut out. I thought they were more of a "screw-and-glue" part :-( Please have a look at the attached photos and let me know if they are helpful. Thanks a million for all of your help on my first rebuild!
[attachment=5424][attachment=5413][attachment=5414][attachment=5415][attachment=5416][attachment=5417][attachment=5418][attachment=5419][attachment=5420][attachment=5421][attachment=5422][attachment=5423]
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#4
Ok great job on the pics, now is the time to chill for a moment and we will treat this as a refurb and the recommended steps that i would do if say you brought it to me and insisted to repair it. first step is to define what it is. pretty much trashed right? It was your bike, you know how it rode, you know if there was ever anything you would have liked to change even before this event right? So step two, define what you would like it to become once complete. i.e. Taller gearing, more speeds, higher bars/stem, things like this understand?. because like I said before, you have a fresh canvas now.
BB is short for Bottom Bracket, this is what your crank arms attach to. your rear spread for your wheels is 135mm, so if you choose you can go 8/9 speed no problem. No major tools to remove the fork, when you purchase your new fork it will have a very long steer tube that will need to be cut to fit, a saw guide will help for a true cut, then deburr and finish the edges. this is when you need to know if you would like to change the bar height or not, because you will have the chance to do so before you cut the fork. stem rise and extension are other factors to consider at this time too.. You are basically building a bike from scratch so think about anything for fit you may like to change and if you would like to modify the gearing for any reason.
you will need tools to take everything off down to the frame, if you or a friend cannot do this you will have to pay a shop a ton and there could be a big problem with seized nuts and bolts. I am amazed at the extent of corrosion depicted here, not a good sign. you have to first make sure the integrity of the frame has not been compromised in any way or your attemp will be futile. Before buying anything, make sure the frame will come apart without damage.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#5
(10-19-2014, 08:48 PM)painkiller Wrote:  Ok great job on the pics, now is the time to chill for a moment and we will treat this as a refurb and the recommended steps that i would do if say you brought it to me and insisted to repair it. first step is to define what it is. pretty much trashed right? It was your bike, you know how it rode, you know if there was ever anything you would have liked to change even before this event right? So step two, define what you would like it to become once complete. i.e. Taller gearing, more speeds, higher bars/stem, things like this understand?. because like I said before, you have a fresh canvas now.
BB is short for Bottom Bracket, this is what your crank arms attach to. your rear spread for your wheels is 135mm, so if you choose you can go 8/9 speed no problem. No major tools to remove the fork, when you purchase your new fork it will have a very long steer tube that will need to be cut to fit, a saw guide will help for a true cut, then deburr and finish the edges. this is when you need to know if you would like to change the bar height or not, because you will have the chance to do so before you cut the fork. stem rise and extension are other factors to consider at this time too.. You are basically building a bike from scratch so think about anything for fit you may like to change and if you would like to modify the gearing for any reason.
you will need tools to take everything off down to the frame, if you or a friend cannot do this you will have to pay a shop a ton and there could be a big problem with seized nuts and bolts. I am amazed at the extent of corrosion depicted here, not a good sign. you have to first make sure the integrity of the frame has not been compromised in any way or your attemp will be futile. Before buying anything, make sure the frame will come apart without damage.

Thanks for the info. I will follow up after I break it down. Thanks again.
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#6
I'll say that I'm actually pretty surprised how little corrosion you have considering. I've seen a lot worse on bikes that were never immersed in salt water. I don't really get what is happening to the spokes. It looks like the nipples are breaking, but these would normally be brass and should corrode. Weird.

Regardless, I agree you should start by taking everything apart. A lot of the seized parts may be fine with a little lube and taking them off the cable that probably are seized. Disk brake calipers are notorious for seizing so I'd guess those are shot though. But I bet a lot of the serviceable bearings just need to be cleaned out. A little surface rust in most areas won't hurt anything.

I assume the frame's aluminum, so it should be fine. Though it might be a good idea to flush the interior of it with some cleaner (alcohol maybe?) to clear out any accumulated salt that could later work it's way into moving parts.
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