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Frame Pump and Tube Patch Questions
#1
I want to create a "tire-repair kit" for next summer. I'd like to ride on the Katy (MKT) trail that runs through town but I don't want to have a repeat of what happened a couple summers ago, so I'd like to create a tire-repair kit.

A couple summers ago I was riding along on the trail, and was a good ten miles from home, when I heard a "psst..." coming out of my rear tire. Within about 30 seconds the tire was completely flat. It was pretty late at that point in the summer day (6:30 or so) so I had to ride my bike on the rocky terrain, on a flat tire, about 10 miles back home. (I didn't have a patch kit.) Thankfully, it did no damage to the rim (even though the terrain was really rocky), but the tire was toast. The bike was a road bike (I know, not the right type of bike for a rocky trail like that) but...

Now I have a mountain bike with 26x1.95 tires on it. I am running new inner tubes in relatively new tires. So, no problem there. One problem is- I have no patch kit or frame pump.

I would like to buy a reliable, yet inexpensive (under $30) frame pump for my 26-inch mountain bike. My worry is- the inner tubes I'm running (Hutchinson-brand tubes) are notorious (at least in my experience) for failure at the valve stem, so I can't be "bending" the valve stem to get the pump on at an angle. I also inspected the rear inner tube a few weeks ago and the valve stem was showing signs of "weakness" (i.e. don't bend it or it'll break off) so I need a frame pump that has a right-angle valve connector.

Another thing I need is a patch kit. I looked at a few online, but the only ones I could find with good ratings and not a high price were at REI. Since we don't have an REI store anywhere near where I live, I obviously can't get something from REI. Is there a cheap, yet reliable solution at Wal-Mart? I obviously need something that will seal the leak in the tube.

Also, I'm 99% sure I won't need tire levers. The tires are loose on the rim when deflated - I can practically reach under the tire and peel the tire off the rim with my hands when the tire is fully deflated.

Any solutions? Any help would be appreciated.

~Garrett
-Garrett, Boonville, MO
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#2
Pump: http://www.amazon.com/Topeak-Turbo-Morph-Bike-Gauge/dp/B000FIE4PO/ref=sr_1_9?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1419894747&sr=1-9&keywords=pump+topeak works great, even for 38-622 tires to 100 psi - that is a LOT of volume and quite a bit of pressure.

Change to Sunlite Thorn Resistant tubes, and you will not need to take a pump with you.....

Patch kit: http://www.amazon.com/Park-Tool-VP-1-Vulcanizing-Single/dp/B000JF2ZB8/ref=pd_bxgy_sg_text_y

I have never had good luck with patch kits, and just carry spare tubes.

Levers: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B001B13I8S/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pd_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=3D7G6CPMWK8AE&coliid=I3GVX9ZCB35RO3
Nigel
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#3
(12-29-2014, 11:19 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  Pump: http://www.amazon.com/Topeak-Turbo-Morph-Bike-Gauge/dp/B000FIE4PO/ref=sr_1_9?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1419894747&sr=1-9&keywords=pump+topeak works great, even for 38-622 tires to 100 psi - that is a LOT of volume and quite a bit of pressure.

Change to Sunlite Thorn Resistant tubes, and you will not need to take a pump with you.....

Patch kit: http://www.amazon.com/Park-Tool-VP-1-Vulcanizing-Single/dp/B000JF2ZB8/ref=pd_bxgy_sg_text_y

I have never had good luck with patch kits, and just carry spare tubes.

Levers: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B001B13I8S/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pd_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=3D7G6CPMWK8AE&coliid=I3GVX9ZCB35RO3

Thank You. The problem with carrying extra tubes is that my wheels don't have quick-release and I really don't know how to remove the rear wheel without screwing anything up.

But, with the Sunlite tubes, wouldn't you have to carry a pump anyways? Remember, that it's not just "thorns" that cause punctures on the MKT (Katy) trail. Idiots break glass bottles and even throw nails on the trail just to cause flats to unsuspecting bicyclists (and no, I'm not making this up...)
-Garrett, Boonville, MO
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#4
Quote:I really don't know how to remove the rear wheel without screwing anything up
It is time to learn.

Most (NOT ALL) B/O wheels need a 15mm wrench for removal.

On the critical rear tire, I also often add a tire liner between the tube and tire for additional protection.

Most pieces of glass are not a problem on the Katy because they sink into the surface and are not rigidly held. Nails will also only cause a puncture if they are pointed towards you. For the most part the Katy's surface is such that most things that can puncture a tire will sink in or get knocked off the trail.

For the Katy; with 559mm BSD ("26 inch MTB") I'd use Kenda's 100 psi 26 x 1.50 (40-559) with K-shield http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0026LLCAS/ tires. The Katy's surface is crush limestone, not really gravel.
Nigel
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#5
Thank You. I take it that you've been on the Katy yourself...

The Bell tires I got (26x1.95) have kevlar in them, if that helps. Not sure if Kevlar would stop a nail or sharp chunk of glass coming through the tire...

I probably will upgrade the tubes this summer, especially to something thicker and more better known. I'd like to try Schwalbe or Continental tubes... not that Hutchinson's are bad, it is just that all of them I've installed have had their valve stems break off while checking the pressure or inflating the tire. But if they're good, I'll keep them as a spare tube (put in my "kit".)

BTW, my wheels are not quick-release type. I know how to get the front off (you don't have to be a rocket scientist to know how to do that) but how do you get the back off? Every time I've tried it I screw something up, and on the trail an "uh oh" 10 miles from home is never good.
-Garrett, Boonville, MO
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#6
Are these your tires: http://www.walmart.com/ip/Mountain-26-Bike-Tire-with-DuPont-Kevlar/5750638 ?

If yes, great for deep mud and sand; awful for Katy and on the street. You want something with a continuous center rib for hard pack (Katy) and pavement.

Bolt On (B/O) rear wheels usually take a 15mm wrench, I do not understand how it is possible to screw something up by just removing and replacing the rear wheel. Have someone video you, and post it here, we can offer advice. Also look at youtube videos on removing rear bicycle wheels.

Schwalbe or Continental tubes - not worth it.

Breaking the valve stem is operator error 99% of the time. You need to firmly hold the valve stem in place when attaching or detaching the pump. A pump with a flexible hose - like the Topeak I recommend - results on less load on the valve stem.

I am a bicycle commuter and always go for minimum effort - I do not want to repair a flat, takes time and effort. I use smooth rolling tires - less effort and quieter. Any noise from a bike is power that could otherwise go into forward motion. Low frequency tire noise especially takes a LOT from forward motion (speed).
Nigel
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#7
(12-30-2014, 02:30 AM)nfmisso Wrote:  Are these your tires: http://www.walmart.com/ip/Mountain-26-Bike-Tire-with-DuPont-Kevlar/5750638 ?

If yes, great for deep mud and sand; awful for Katy and on the street. You want something with a continuous center rib for hard pack (Katy) and pavement.

Bolt On (B/O) rear wheels usually take a 15mm wrench, I do not understand how it is possible to screw something up by just removing and replacing the rear wheel. Have someone video you, and post it here, we can offer advice. Also look at youtube videos on removing rear bicycle wheels.

Schwalbe or Continental tubes - not worth it.

Breaking the valve stem is operator error 99% of the time. You need to firmly hold the valve stem in place when attaching or detaching the pump. A pump with a flexible hose - like the Topeak I recommend - results on less load on the valve stem.

I am a bicycle commuter and always go for minimum effort - I do not want to repair a flat, takes time and effort. I use smooth rolling tires - less effort and quieter. Any noise from a bike is power that could otherwise go into forward motion. Low frequency tire noise especially takes a LOT from forward motion (speed).

Yes, those are my tires. They seem to work fine on the streets, but I haven't had a chance to get on the Katy trail lately. I like the fact it has Kevlar- but I'm not sure if that will protect me from any "real" punctures like nails or glass.

The nice thing is that the Schwalbe and Continental tubes have threaded valves with lock-nuts. So the valve won't slide back in the rim when the tube is deflated, and makes inflation easier. I don't know if it is my fingers (fat fingers?) but I really can't "hold" onto the valve stem that well while inflating.

Also, does it hurt if only about half of the valve stem is sticking out of the rim while the tire is inflated?

BTW, the recommended pressure is 40-65 PSI on that tire. I usually inflate them to 20-40 PSI. Although I'm 300 pounds, I haven't had any real major problems with that pressure (no pinch flats or snakebites) and it adds some cushioning, although one time I pumped it up to 60-65 (rear 65# and front with 55#) and it was really easy to pedal, although it felt like I was riding on wood (I could feel every rock or crack in the road.)

ALSO:
Quote:Bolt On (B/O) rear wheels usually take a 15mm wrench, I do not understand how it is possible to screw something up by just removing and replacing the rear wheel. Have someone video you, and post it here, we can offer advice. Also look at youtube videos on removing rear bicycle wheels.
The rear wheel is quite difficult to get off. For an experienced bicyclist who has done it half a million times in his/her life, it should be easy. But for someone who hasn't done it in their life, it is difficult, especially with all of the mechanical components (derailleur, chain, brake, etc.)

I'll get some pictures of the wheel when I can - this week is pretty busy for me as it is Christmas Break for us at school (I'm in high school.)
-Garrett, Boonville, MO
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#8
if u was in georgia i could fix that ik how to well ive done a bunch to mountain bikes i got 4 mountain bike to be exact and im bout to sell two of my four mountain bikes
southern pride
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#9
(12-30-2014, 05:28 PM)joseph wolf man Wrote:  if u was in georgia i could fix that ik how to well ive done a bunch to mountain bikes i got 4 mountain bike to be exact and im bout to sell two of my four mountain bikes

???

I'm sorry (if I'm being rude) but I can't understand 1/2 of what you said. I don't need a new mountain bike - mine is perfectly fine. I just am wondering about a frame pump and patch kit.
-Garrett, Boonville, MO
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#10
The tube with a threaded stem is a whole different kind of stem. Those are Presta stems and take a different kind of pump head. You're not gonna air them up at a gas station (without an adapter).
I've never had a stem fail and I use walmart tubes and/or cheap tubes from Nashbar. You just have to be careful with them.
Craig Domingue - East Texas Hick
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#11
(12-31-2014, 12:32 PM)cradom Wrote:  The tube with a threaded stem is a whole different kind of stem. Those are Presta stems and take a different kind of pump head. You're not gonna air them up at a gas station (without an adapter).
I've never had a stem fail and I use walmart tubes and/or cheap tubes from Nashbar. You just have to be careful with them.
The Continental/Schwalbe tubes have threaded schrader valves.

[Image: Schwalbe-Extra-Light-Tubes-Review.jpg]

Sorry for the huge pic, don't really know how to resize pictures in BBC.
-Garrett, Boonville, MO
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#12
Ok, learn something every day.
Craig Domingue - East Texas Hick
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#13
(12-31-2014, 03:17 PM)cradom Wrote:  Ok, learn something every day.

Yep. The Continentals are also threaded. I knew Presta tubes are often threaded, but you can also buy them smooth.

My MTB has schrader rims, so it won't fit Presta tubes without a special grommet.
-Garrett, Boonville, MO
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#14
(12-31-2014, 03:19 PM)garrett01 Wrote:  
(12-31-2014, 03:17 PM)cradom Wrote:  Ok, learn something every day.

Yep. The Continentals are also threaded. I knew Presta tubes are often threaded, but you can also buy them smooth.

My MTB has schrader rims, so it won't fit Presta tubes without a special grommet.
While on this subject. Better than the plastic grommet for presta to a schrader rim.
I find these to work great. much better style. worth the extra to me.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#15
A couple suggestions. Get the tools you need o take off your rear wheel. Practice at home removing the wheel and reinstalling it. You cant mess anything up, maybe change some adjustments that you'll need to readjust. But, this is all part of the mechanics learning process and it will make you more confident with your tire changing/wheel removal skills when your out there. Quicker too.

I ride with one extra tube, a patch kit, two tire levers, CO2 cracker and two CO2 cartridges. Oh yeah, and a cell phone. I transformed from carrying a pump to CO2 cartidges. Why? They are cheap, easy to use and small to carry. I would buy it from REI.com and they are cheap for the low end kit(genuine-innovations $15). The spent cartridges are recyclable too!

The thorn resistant tubes are good way to go too. Many cyclists take this approach for peace of mind. But heavier if thats a concern.
Good Luck and practice, practice, practice
GO RIDE...
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#16
sorry yesterday i didnt mean how i put that i meant i could possibly fix the whole u not knowing how to fix a rear wheel n plus also get u a tire patch kit easy i had a bad migrane yesterday n everything was foggy in my mind
southern pride
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