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#1
I just wanted to put this out there to see if anyone else is aware of these. I just ran across this website and these bikes seem interesting. Any opinions?
http://www.dynamicbicycles.com/

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#2
Definitely interesting. The major test of an idea is not whether it's technically good, but whether it catches on in a marketing sense to cause people to want to turn aside from ubiquitous and cheaper tech. The grass has grown high at many companies that have put out technically better things (though I can't say without riding & working on one).
This reminds me of a infomercial that caught my eye one night that featured a bicycle with an automatic shift (rear). I'm not sure if this is the company that was advertising, but it's an example of one.
So what do people think of these seemingly better but one-off technologies?

Why is it that they make adult bikes that'll generally work for 5'9" or above, yet when you pedal these same bikes they only work for someone who is 5'4" or so?
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#3
Shaft drive is more popular in Europe for commuter style bikes because they are lower maintenance and you don't have to worry about grease on your clothes, etc. They probably work pretty well for moderate riding. But I suspect you will pay a bit more for a bike like this than a similarly equipped bike with a regular drive train.

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#4
Remember in the "old" days when automatic transmissions for automobiles started to appear? The general feeling was that they were less fuel efficient and performance was inferior to a manual transmission. The manual transmission guys were pretty elitist and automatic transmissions were looked down on. But, try to find a new car with a manual transmission now. There are some but not very many still available.
This looks like a very interesting concept with a lot of potential. I agree with what Skyguy9999 says, though. Even if it is technically sound, marketing and consumer acceptance will determine the success, or failure.

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#5
I purchased a shaft drive bike from dynamic bicycles and it's truly an outstanding ride different from any chain bike... Quiet and very strong bike, the Shimano alfine hub is seamless, only time will tell if the claim of this Sussex shaft drive system is truly very low maintenance, but so far it's working great. I'll keep you all posted.
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#6
Shaft drive bicycles have been around for more than 110 years......

Here is an 1899 Columbia:
http://coopertechnica.com/_image/1899-Columbia-Model-59-Shaft-Drive-Bicycle-1.jpg
Nigel
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#7
(05-06-2013, 02:27 PM)biking4life Wrote:  I purchased a shaft drive bike from dynamic bicycles and it's truly an outstanding ride different from any chain bike... Quiet and very strong bike, the Shimano alfine hub is seamless, only time will tell if the claim of this Sussex shaft drive system is truly very low maintenance, but so far it's working great. I'll keep you all posted.
I want to see some pics baby!
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#8
Yeah, pics or it didn't happen! My thought would be that the efficiency is lower than with a regular chain based system? Any commetns from the engineers?

(and @srglassw, in my part of the world you have a hard time finding a car without a manual shift, except for the semi-manual shifting of the very high end cars)
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#9
Efficiency delta; 1 or 2 % at most, assuming everything is pristine; a slightly dirty or rusty chain will eliminate any efficiency advantage.
Nigel
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#10
Wow, that is impressive, and I also guess that the shaft drive system is much easier to encapsulate.
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#11
(05-08-2013, 08:31 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  Efficiency delta; 1 or 2 % at most, assuming everything is pristine; a slightly dirty or rusty chain will eliminate any efficiency advantage.

Yeah, unless you're looking at a race bike where a few % make a big difference, I wonder why these haven't taken off more. It does lock you into a set gear range more than a chain or even belt drive, and there is a weight penalty. But it seems so durable and clean, I wonder...

Maybe it's more a matter of experience on the manufacturer and consumer sides? Shaft drive just seems weird? Don't know.
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#12
(05-09-2013, 09:06 PM)DaveM Wrote:  ...... I wonder why these haven't taken off more.....

Cost; bevel gears and the associate bearings are very expensive compared to chain rings.
Nigel
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#13
(05-10-2013, 03:13 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  Cost; bevel gears and the associate bearings are very expensive compared to chain rings.

Well that makes sense. I did always wonder why shaft drive was pretty niche in motorcycles as well where weight and efficiency weren't as big issues. But there's no industry where cost isn't an issue.
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#14
(05-06-2013, 03:48 PM)nfmisso Wrote:  Shaft drive bicycles have been around for more than 110 years......

Here is an 1899 Columbia:
http://coopertechnica.com/_image/1899-Columbia-Model-59-Shaft-Drive-Bicycle-1.jpg

Man Nigel I was just gonna say that!
Good maintenance to your Bike, can make it like the wheels are, true and smooth!
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