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Refurb help for a newbie
#1
Hello all. I am riding around on a 10-12 year old Schwinn Voyageur. In the past i have taken the bike to a shop whenever I need to tune it up and have any work done. Circumstances have changed and I can't really afford to pay anyone to work on things that I should be able to learn how to do.

I've ridden bikes all my life, but have never had to learn how to repair or maintain one. I don't own any tools other than a few basics like a hammer or a screwdriver.

From what I can tell, my bike is in desperate need of a new chain. Also a good number of the gear sprockets that fit the chain are worn and I'll be needing to replace the freewheel cassette and the chainwheel.

I don't mind taking everything apart and getting dirty while I learn how to replace it all. However I need to make certain I have all the tools needed for the job as well as all the parts. I don't own a car so running back and forth for parts after I've taken my bike apart would just be a disaster.

I'm hoping a more experienced member of this forum might be willing to provide a list of things I need to have and maybe a good place to order everything from as well as any tips or heads up on issues I need to be aware before I start the project.
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#2
I would first recommend getting photo's to upload on the site. Start with close up shots of the Bottom bracket area and the front chainrings, the rear cluster and any decals to help us pinpoint the year closer and make recommendations for you. tell us the tooth count on the inner and outer rings up front and in the rear set.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#3
[img][Image: IMG_02471_zpsanwsm9wr.jpg][/img]

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#4
Good job, now get the info we need, tooth count and the shots. Looks like a dept/ walmart type bike correct?

(02-24-2015, 12:49 AM)painkiller Wrote:  Good job, now get the info we need, tooth count and the shots. Looks like a dept/ walmart type bike correct?

I see them now. you are certain it is a freewheel than a cassette, and it is a 7 speed cluster
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#5
The crank set looks fine.  The chain rings are steel - they will out last all of us.

Get a ruler to measure the chain.  Place zero by one pin, now look at the ten inch mark; the pin should be less than 1/16" off the ten inch mark.  If it is more, you need a new chain.  If it is more than 1/8" off,  you need a new freewheel.  If the chain is okay length wise, wipe it down with a cleanish rag, and liberally lubricate it with Tri-Flo or similar light oil.  Run it thru all the gears, then wipe in down with a cleaner.

Are you close to San Jose?
Nigel
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#6
I will post the tooth count tomorrow. Please let me know if I need to provide some more images.

This bike was purchased from a bike shop a little over a decade ago.

Nigel I am indeed near San Jose. I should add that I took this to a bike shop recently and the owner measured and said I needed a new chain.
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#7
there ya go Hobo! Nigel will hook you up!
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#8
(02-24-2015, 01:12 AM)hobowheels Wrote:  I will post the tooth count tomorrow. Please let me know if I need to provide some more images.

This bike was purchased from a bike shop a little over a decade ago.

Nigel I am indeed near San Jose. I should add that I took this to a bike shop recently and the owner measured and said I needed a new chain.

I will PM you.
Nigel
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#9
Another good way to learn (and I did this myself) is to buy the two DVD set of lessons from this site
The lesson are very well done. The picture are extremely clear. The tools you need for each repair are identified in each lesson. Or you can subscribe monthly to these lessons for around $5 a month I think it is?
"Where ever we go, there we are"
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#10
Okay the tooth count for the outer/larger cog up front is 48 and it definitely has some worn teeth. The smallest cog up front has 28 teeth and they seem to be in pretty good shape. Do I not need a count on the middle cog up front? That's the one I use the most and likely the most worn of the three.

I'll update with a count for the rear setup in a bit.
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#11
(02-24-2015, 08:58 PM)hobowheels Wrote:  Okay the tooth count for the outer/larger cog up front is 48 and it definitely has some worn teeth. The smallest cog up front has 28 teeth and they seem to be in pretty good shape. Do I not need a count on the middle cog up front? That's the one I use the most and likely the most worn of the three.

........

Please note that the large and middle rings have teeth of varying height and shape; this to help with shifting into the larger ring.  The varying tooth profile, along with pins and ramps (separately) came out in the '90's as far as I can tell with indexed front shifting.   The smallest ring usually has all the teeth the same.  The 48T ring in the picture does not look worn.   Worn teeth have an undercut on the back side.
Nigel
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#12
The Original Voyager was a upper mid level bike. with a Columbus Tenex frame.

The chain guard on crank is broken. I'd take that off. Stamped steel teeth are fine. Cassette looks OK too that large low gear is unusual. Check chain length as described above. I doubt its badly worn. You just need to go through it and fix whats not working clean and lubricate, head, crank, wheel bearings and levers, chain. There may be solid wheel bearings and crank in which case if not wobbly or noisy leave alone. Only way to tell is look.
Never Give Up!!!
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#13
(02-25-2015, 12:46 AM)GeorgeET Wrote:  ........ Cassette looks OK too that large low gear is unusual. ......

Hi George;

The bike in the pictures has a Shimano Megarange Freewheel, not a cassette.

http://www.niagaracycle.com/categories/shimano-tourney-mf-tz31-7-speed-megarange-freewheel-14-34?gclid=CNnuhtLz-8MCFQdhfgodQJoAIQ

Looking closely at the picture, you can see the edge of the freewheel behind the drop out that matches the picture on Niagara's site.  This freewheel is VERY common OEM on low end bikes, even more so than the 14-28 and 13-28 7 speed freewheels.  Of course, if you have a bike with the Megarange on it, after riding for awhile, you will replace it with a 14-28 or 13-28 - that 24 to 34 jump is murder on the knees.
Nigel
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#14
(02-25-2015, 01:09 AM)nfmisso Wrote:  
(02-25-2015, 12:46 AM)GeorgeET Wrote:  ........ Cassette looks OK too that large low gear is unusual. ......

Hi George;

The bike in the pictures has a Shimano Megarange Freewheel, not a cassette.

http://www.niagaracycle.com/categories/shimano-tourney-mf-tz31-7-speed-megarange-freewheel-14-34?gclid=CNnuhtLz-8MCFQdhfgodQJoAIQ

Looking closely at the picture, you can see the edge of the freewheel behind the drop out that matches the picture on Niagara's site.  This freewheel is VERY common OEM on low end bikes, even more so than the 14-28 and 13-28 7 speed freewheels.  Of course, if you have a bike with the Megarange on it, after riding for awhile, you will replace it with a 14-28 or 13-28 - that 24 to 34 jump is murder on the knees.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Thanks for info, Nigel. Did not think recently made bikes used freewheel. But guess at this level they still do. BTW on my MB I want to a 20T granny gear in front, the 28T is large. But that's for climbs only.
Never Give Up!!!
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#15
Hi George;

Am I reading you correct, 20T granny ring in front, instead of a 28T granny ring in front?  What about in back?  Or did I mis-understand, and you have a 20T in front and a 28T in back?

For my '83 Trek 620 (touring) build; I am planning a 3x9 with 12-36 in back, with 48-38-28 in front, but thinking that maybe it should be 48-36-24 instead.  I do not have high cadence (big heavy old legs), and level with a slight tail wind will get me into a 48-12 combination with 35-622 tires.  

I have been debating about building my '92 Trek 950 up as a 1X9 with a 12-36 and a 48T front ring.

I tend to go with larger cogs and rings, which reduce the stretch stress in the chain and on the individual teeth.

My WT is going to be change to 2X8 with 52-39 in front and to 14-32 (custom made of a Shimano 13-26 8 speed, plus a Miche 14T first position cog and a Shimano 32T from a 11-32).  The leftovers plus a Mich 12T first position cog will be made into a 12-28 8 speed cassette for my PDG70.
Nigel
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#16
Ooops you are right Nigel its a 24T granny gear. The mountain bike a Schwinn Aluminum "High Plains" 1991 by PDG. Came with 48/38/28 on crank and 13-30 rear cluster. I rode mountain bike patrol in Santa Monica Mountains with some serious climbs so I put a 24 T granny gear on crank to replace the 28T oem..
Never Give Up!!!
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