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How to set V-Brake Pads
#1
It has been asked a times how to set brake pads. This is one way to go about how to do it. It works really well and near automatic line up of the pad to rim surface and even pad toe. But first, I will try to be as short winded as I can but most all video's or explanation "how to's" seem to fall short on what leads up to the service to be performed. This involves everything up to the task at hand. (Brake pads) in this case.
Processes in proper order 1,2,3,etc... Before doing brakes start off the bike and inspect/adjust your way to the brakes first. So step one would be to make sure your axle is adjusted correctly, step 2 make sure your rim is true and dished/centered properly, step3 polish/clean lube the brake bosses. Now you can proceed to the task at hand. If you perform processes in proper order you will never have to complete a task only to then find out something just did not come out right and then go back and correct it. (The 1,3,2 Approach).
No video, only pics today as it is to cold outside and my video cam is not to clear inside. A quik explanation followed by a series of pics I hope it all falls together for you. If not feel free to ask any questions. You will probably not find this method in any publication or video. I have not made it yet! ha.
the first pic you will see "toe tape" and Glaze scuff marks on the pads. I give a quik 220 grit scuff to break the new surface of the pad. (optional). I use the rubber/foam tape on the rear of the pad so when I set the pad to rim I have automatic toe set.
release the springs and leave the pads loose and free moving. hold the pads to rim where you want them and set the clamp, now align the rear of the pads. now your pads will be automatically flush with the rim surface and toed, and equally lined in the obround of the arm. Now hold pad to keep from moving while you tighten the pad. I find that quick little torque twitches with the wrench help keep the pad from shifting til you can put the balls to it to lock it down. Take the clamp off and set the cable to your liking. That is all there is to it, perfect pad alignment automatic!. One note: If after a test ride and you have some squeal,re toe and set with thicker toe tape. (two layers).
[Image: toetape_zpswevlxljd.jpg]
[Image: clampII_zpsjq3ttwv3.jpg]
[Image: clampI_zpss1a6p1xq.jpg]
[Image: finI_zpspwi09hl3.jpg]
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#2
(03-28-2015, 04:53 PM)painkiller Wrote:  It has been asked a times how to set brake pads. This is one way to go about how to do it. It works really well and near automatic line up of the pad to rim surface and even pad toe. But first, I will try to be as short winded as I can but most all video's or explanation "how to's" seem to fall short on what leads up to the service to be performed. This involves everything up to the task at hand. (Brake pads) in this case.
Processes in proper order 1,2,3,etc... Before doing brakes start off the bike and inspect/adjust your way to the brakes first. So step one would be to make sure your axle is adjusted correctly, step 2 make sure your rim is true and dished/centered properly, step3 polish/clean lube the brake bosses. Now you can proceed to the task at hand. If you perform processes in proper order you will never have to complete a task only to then find out something just did not come out right and then go back and correct it. (The 1,3,2 Approach).
No video, only pics today as it is to cold outside and my video cam is not to clear inside. A quik explanation followed by a series of pics I hope it all falls together for you. If not feel free to ask any questions. You will probably not find this method in any publication or video. I have not made it yet! ha.
the first pic you will see "toe tape" and Glaze scuff marks on the pads. I give a quik 220 grit scuff to break the new surface of the pad. (optional). I use the rubber/foam tape on the rear of the pad so when I set the pad to rim I have automatic toe set.
release the springs and leave the pads loose and free moving. hold the pads to rim where you want them and set the clamp, now align the rear of the pads. now your pads will be automatically flush with the rim surface and toed, and equally lined in the obround of the arm. Now hold pad to keep from moving while you tighten the pad. I find that quick little torque twitches with the wrench help keep the pad from shifting til you can put the balls to it to lock it down. Take the clamp off and set the cable to your liking. That is all there is to it, perfect pad alignment automatic!. One note: If after a test ride and you have some squeal,re toe and set with thicker toe tape. (two layers).
[Image: toetape_zpswevlxljd.jpg]
[Image: clampII_zpsjq3ttwv3.jpg]
[Image: clampI_zpss1a6p1xq.jpg]
[Image: finI_zpspwi09hl3.jpg]

(03-28-2015, 04:53 PM)painkiller Wrote:  Good stuff PK. Enjoyed the read. Printed it out and in my shed it goes for the next brake job.
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It has been asked a times how to set brake pads. This is one way to go about how to do it. It works really well and near automatic line up of the pad to rim surface and even pad toe. But first, I will try to be as short winded as I can but most all video's or explanation "how to's" seem to fall short on what leads up to the service to be performed. This involves everything up to the task at hand. (Brake pads) in this case.
Processes in proper order 1,2,3,etc... Before doing brakes start off the bike and inspect/adjust your way to the brakes first. So step one would be to make sure your axle is adjusted correctly, step 2 make sure your rim is true and dished/centered properly, step3 polish/clean lube the brake bosses. Now you can proceed to the task at hand. If you perform processes in proper order you will never have to complete a task only to then find out something just did not come out right and then go back and correct it. (The 1,3,2 Approach).
No video, only pics today as it is to cold outside and my video cam is not to clear inside. A quik explanation followed by a series of pics I hope it all falls together for you. If not feel free to ask any questions. You will probably not find this method in any publication or video. I have not made it yet! ha.
the first pic you will see "toe tape" and Glaze scuff marks on the pads. I give a quik 220 grit scuff to break the new surface of the pad. (optional). I use the rubber/foam tape on the rear of the pad so when I set the pad to rim I have automatic toe set.
release the springs and leave the pads loose and free moving. hold the pads to rim where you want them and set the clamp, now align the rear of the pads. now your pads will be automatically flush with the rim surface and toed, and equally lined in the obround of the arm. Now hold pad to keep from moving while you tighten the pad. I find that quick little torque twitches with the wrench help keep the pad from shifting til you can put the balls to it to lock it down. Take the clamp off and set the cable to your liking. That is all there is to it, perfect pad alignment automatic!. One note: If after a test ride and you have some squeal,re toe and set with thicker toe tape. (two layers).
[Image: toetape_zpswevlxljd.jpg]
[Image: clampII_zpsjq3ttwv3.jpg]
[Image: clampI_zpss1a6p1xq.jpg]
[Image: finI_zpspwi09hl3.jpg]

Good stuff PK. Enjoyed the read. I printed it out and will use it on my next brake job.
"Where ever we go, there we are"
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#3
Thanks Elmore, I did this with you in mind buddy. I saw a 2pk of the 4 1/4in clamps on Ebay for like $11 US shipped. I did this with the tire off for clarity, but the clamp can go on the under side too. No more fumbling with the pads and wrenches and spring pressure and totally self aligning and toe in. The steps are a tad different for the post type canti pads but still sweet without fumbling or worrying about all the moving parts that annoy Nigel. pretty much self aligning also without fumbling with wrenches and springs. That is why I did not post this one in your post as it was for canti's. Plus I want to make a video for that one so you can see it happen in real time and I can better show what, how, and why things are happening as I do it. Remember to leave the pads loose as a goose until clamped and lined up. you will laugh at how automatically everything is lined up and how easy this method is. So much it fact, you scoff at every tutorial or video ever done on this subject. Sorry Sheldon and the other Pro's out there. I mean no dis respect though. They are all just repeating the same thing with their spin on it. When the weather breaks I will post a video for your Canti's Elmore, on its own and in your thread
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#4
(03-29-2015, 05:00 PM)painkiller Wrote:  Thanks Elmore, I did this with you in mind buddy. I saw a 2pk of the 4 1/4in clamps on Ebay for like $11 US shipped. I did this with the tire off for clarity, but the clamp can go on the under side too. No more fumbling with the pads and wrenches and spring pressure and totally self aligning and toe in. The steps are a tad different for the post type canti pads but still sweet without fumbling or worrying about all the moving parts that annoy Nigel. pretty much self aligning also without fumbling with wrenches and springs. That is why I did not post this one in your post as it was for canti's. Plus I want to make a video for that one so you can see it happen in real time and I can better show what, how, and why things are happening as I do it. Remember to leave the pads loose as a goose until clamped and lined up. you will laugh at how automatically everything is lined up and how easy this method is. So much it fact, you scoff at every tutorial or video ever done on this subject. Sorry Sheldon and the other Pro's out there. I mean no dis respect though. They are all just repeating the same thing with their spin on it. Whn the weather breaks I will post a video for your Canti's Elmore, on its own and in your thread
Thanks again PK. I will get a set of those Irwin Quick grip 41/4 inch clamps. i think my hardware store has them. If not I will get them off if the net.
"Where ever we go, there we are"
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#5
You are quite welcome Elmore, Once you try it out, please share your experience with this method for us, I would like to hear your thoughts. I will get your canti video soon!
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#6
Step last...
Clean heck out of those braking surfaces? That rim looks a little rough.
Craig Domingue - East Texas Hick
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#7
(03-30-2015, 12:06 PM)cradom Wrote:  Step last...
Clean heck out of those braking surfaces? That rim looks a little rough.
What kind of cleaner do you recommend Craig? A mill? ha. you should see the front rim. It is as if they never used the front brake at all. It looks worse in the picture than reality. One reason I never liked black ano braking surfaces and another reason why one should never use dry 20+ year old pads! Smile
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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#8
I hear ya on the old pads! And I don't think the rims will fit on a clutch grinding mill Smile
I have a BSO from Target with those kind of brakes and I don't think I'll ever get them operating properly. They're just too cheaply made. Long as the thing stops I'm OK.
Thank goodness for my two road bikes. Not going to spend money upgrading on such a cheap bike.
Craig Domingue - East Texas Hick
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#9
These brakes are AVid single digit 5 with speed dial levers. not quite the same as on a Target bike, unless they offer $700+ bikes. These are a breeze to set up and hit as hard as you need. I suggest you give yours an upgrade.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
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