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Throaty Whine or Low Pitch Whistle
#1
I need advice on a maintenance issue.

Ok, I am not a novice rider, but not a hard core rider either.  Normally I have had someone nearby that could or would help with minor maintenance over the years, so I know nothing.

The bike is essentially new.  Due to military obligations it was ridden a couple of times after purchase and then packed, stored, shipped, stored again and then packed and shipped again (purchased in '11).  I am now in Saudi Arabia and want to ride it around the compound to and from work/store.  

I had the tubes replaced since the ones that came with the bike were German and I could not find the adaptor required.  The pedals are on ok, the handle bars tightened and the brakes all work.  But, when I ride, and even when coasting or walking the bike, there is a hefty whine.  It is more than a whistle as it is deeper in sound quality, but it is not a hum since there is no vibration quality to it.  

Since the bike has mainly been sitting, I thought perhaps it needs lubrication.  I do not know if I can source a proper lube here.  I am female and cannot drive off compound, our on-compound support store is very limited.  If someone thinks lube is the way to fix this, or the first approach, please suggest a source or brand I can find online.

And, yes, it is HOT here.  Only here a month so far, but warm is not the way to describe it. ;-)

I am also looking for a good pop-up type shelter for the bike to help with the sand storms.  Suggestions?

Gut
(Gutgenug means good enough in Deutsche, pronounced Goot Gen OOg)
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#2
You need to lubricants for bikes: a light oil (0W or 10W motor oil or 3:1 oil is fine) and a grease - automotive wheel bearing grease is fine.  I use Tri-Flow for my light oil, and boat trailer wheel bearing grease.

Check out Alex's instructions for lubricating various systems on your bike.
Nigel
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#3
(07-07-2015, 06:24 AM)Gutgenug Wrote:  I need advice on a maintenance issue.

Ok, I am not a novice rider, but not a hard core rider either.  Normally I have had someone nearby that could or would help with minor maintenance over the years, so I know nothing.

The bike is essentially new.  Due to military obligations it was ridden a couple of times after purchase and then packed, stored, shipped, stored again and then packed and shipped again (purchased in '11).  I am now in Saudi Arabia and want to ride it around the compound to and from work/store.  

I had the tubes replaced since the ones that came with the bike were German and I could not find the adaptor required.  The pedals are on ok, the handle bars tightened and the brakes all work.  But, when I ride, and even when coasting or walking the bike, there is a hefty whine.  It is more than a whistle as it is deeper in sound quality, but it is not a hum since there is no vibration quality to it.  

e has mainly been sitting, I thought perhaps it needs lubrication.  I do not know if I can source a proper lube here.  I am female and cannot drive off compound, our on-compound support store is very limited.  If someone thinks lube is the way to fix this, or the first approach, please suggest a source or brand I can find online.

And, yes, it is HOT here.  Only here a month so far, but warm is not the way to describe it. ;-)

I am also looking for a good pop-up type shelter for the bike to help with the sand storms.  Suggestions?

Gut
(Gutgenug means good enough in Deutsche, pronounced Goot Gen OOg)

If the bike has fenders it may be the wheels and the fenders touching. If no fenders just ignore.
"Where ever we go, there we are"
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#4
nfmisso
Thanks. I will look at that and see if any of the other riders here on the compound have lube.

I went for a perimeter ride last night and through some test/evaluation I determined the whine is coming from the front disk brake.  If I put just a touch of tension on the brake handle the whine goes away.  If I put a bit too much weight on the brake handle it squeals as if the brake is dragging.

So, how do I adjust the brake cable/disk/pads to stop the whine?  Any tips/thoughts?


Gut

Elmore
you are wise; when a bike is packed and shipped the first thing we normally do is check the fenders. The packers, for the most part, do a good job, but when it comes to bikes..... The fenders do often get bent or the frame that holds the fenders gets bent.

When I unwrapped it both fenders had to be adjusted because of permanent contact with the tires.

After some adjustments, there is a random scraping noise when I pick up a rock, but otherwise the fenders are no longer rubbing.

Was not the source of the whine tho. That seems to be coming from the front disk brake. I posted another reply and described it.

Good advice tho, thanks!
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#5
Ah disc brakes.....

You'll need to identify the brand and model of the brakes you have, then use Google or similar to find documentation.  
Are the cable actuated or hydraulic?
Nigel
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#6
actuated or what?????? Already way out of my lane.

A guy that works on the compound came by, he said one pad was up against the disc. So, I adjusted the front spoke hub to loosen on one side and tighten on the other. I did not do it enough, but it seems to address the problem.

I will do a bit more of the adjustment and see if I can get a good solution. If not, I will have to do the research you suggest.... actuated??? (they are cables just like the back brake, very much a non-fancy bike, bought it in a grocery/household goods store in Germany).

I really appreciate all your support, THANKS!!

Gut
Reply
#7
Cable actuated bicycle disc brake:
[Image: aviddisc.gif]

Hydraulic actuated bicycle disc brake:
[Image: SRAM_Red_HRD_caliper.JPG]

Cable actuated  uses a metal stranded wire inside a housing to operate the brake.  Hydraulic uses oil inside a hose to operate the brake.

Hydraulic ones do not like to be turned upside down.

PLEASE NOTE: adjusting the spokes will have no effect on the brake.  None components of a disc brake are anywhere near the spokes, and are not connected to the spokes.
Nigel
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