Bicycle TutorBicycle Tutor

Show off your bike!

Related video tutorials:
Telescoping Seat post
#1
My question will probably sound crazy, just bear with me. I have issues getting on and off the bike, a long story why, it seems to be my permanent reality. I like the seat way up so that I may maximize my leg stretch. I get on my bike and raise the seat several times but then must lay the bike down or lower the seat to get off. Hindsight is always 20-20, perhaps I should've bought a step thru frame but when buying, I wanted fat tires, disc brakes and a suspension fork and those were features were not on step thru frames at the LBS, and the LBS already thought I was crazy from my never ending questioning, so I bought a bike that matched most of my specs. I have been refining the bike ever since.

Is there a seat post product that drops the seat down all the way for getting on and off but will firmly "click" into position onto the post into the rider's setting?
Reply
#2
(10-04-2015, 03:37 PM)Old Duane Wrote:  My question will probably sound crazy, just bear with me. I have issues getting on and off the bike, a long story why, it seems to be my permanent reality. I like the seat way up so that I may maximize my leg stretch. I get on my bike and raise the seat several times but then must lay the bike down or lower the seat to get off. Hindsight is always 20-20, perhaps I should've bought a step thru frame but when buying, I wanted fat tires, disc brakes and a suspension fork and those were features were not on step thru frames at the LBS, and the LBS already thought I was crazy from my never ending questioning, so I bought a bike that matched most of my specs. I have been refining the bike ever since.

Is there a seat post product that drops the seat down all the way for getting on and off but will firmly "click" into position onto the post into the rider's setting?

That is rather a unsafe way to ride. You should be able to get up and down off the bike seat. I set my seat so my heel is flat at the bottom of the pedal with a very, very slight flex in the knee. I feel this is plenty high up and quite safe in any circumstance. The other thing is maybe your bike is too big for you?
"Where ever we go, there we are"
Reply
#3
(10-04-2015, 06:25 PM)elmore leonard Wrote:  
(10-04-2015, 03:37 PM)Old Duane Wrote:  My question will probably sound crazy, just bear with me. I have issues getting on and off the bike, a long story why, it seems to be my permanent reality. I like the seat way up so that I may maximize my leg stretch. I get on my bike and raise the seat several times but then must lay the bike down or lower the seat to get off. Hindsight is always 20-20, perhaps I should've bought a step thru frame but when buying, I wanted fat tires, disc brakes and a suspension fork and those were features were not on step thru frames at the LBS, and the LBS already thought I was crazy from my never ending questioning, so I bought a bike that matched most of my specs. I have been refining the bike ever since.

Is there a seat post product that drops the seat down all the way for getting on and off but will firmly "click" into position onto the post into the rider's setting?

That is rather a unsafe way to ride. You should be able to get up and down off the bike seat. I set my seat so my heel is flat at the bottom of the pedal with a very, very slight flex in the knee. I feel this is plenty high up and quite safe in any circumstance. The other thing is maybe your bike is too big for you?

Getting on and off the seat is easy. Lifting my leg over the seat to get on and off the bike can be challenging, sometimes dangerous. My range-of-motion issues have gotten better but are still not resolved. My preferred optimum foot position is when the ball of the foot is on the pedal with a very slight knee flex...during a past life, I used toe clips extensively. Because of my need to frequently adjust the seat, up and down, I find my arch is often on the pedal with a large bend in my knee, ultimately I stop, re-adjust the seat while on the bike and try again. The shorter the ride is, the more annoying these adjustments are. If I master getting on & off smoothly, I will be more confident in installing and using toe clips.
Reply
#4
Rockshox and others make what they call a "dropper" seatpost. they are quite expensive but will do what you are asking.
http://www.competitivecyclist.com/thomson-dropper-seatpost?CMP_SKU=THP0020&MER=0406&skid=THP0020-BK-S272XS430&CMP_ID=PLA_GOc014&mv_pc=r101&utm_source=Google&utm_medium=PLA&CSPID=0914&mr:trackingCode=0FE7856E-0BF4-E411-AAA2-001B21BCB944&mr:referralID=NA&mr:device=c&mr:adType=plaonline&mr:ad=81822233821&mr:keyword&mr:match&mr:tid=kwd-112886522461&mr:ploc=9022118&mr:iloc&mr:store&mr:filter=112886522461&gclid=CIOEutqjqsgCFQ6DaQod3nsAOg&gclsrc=aw.ds
this is an expensive one because after all it is a Thompson. Google dropper seat post and you will find cheaper ones out there, but probably still starting around $140. you can also find them used but still high $$$

try this, sorry
http://www.jensonusa.com/Thomson-Elite-Dropper-Seatpost
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
Reply
#5
OMG PK, I just looked at $5,000 bikes and $450 seat post. You must hang with a different crowd than I. :-))

As per bike Duane . IMO bite the bullet and trade your bike in on one that works for you. You do not need all the gizmos. Ask PK to find you a nice used step through that will cost way more than that seat post.

You do not say what kind of riding you do or how big you are , but I doubt you really need disc brakes and suspension fork.

AS per toe clips I got rid of mine. I am not that serious a rider that I need them, and I like getting off quickly when I need to without getting my foot stuck.

YMMV..........
Never Give Up!!!
Reply
#6
I hear ya George, can you say heart attack! ha. I just answered his question thats all. Your advice is the way to go. Get a different bike. when a seatpost costs as much as a good bike or a front fork. crazy I know. I work to hard for my money.
There are two kinds of people in the world, "Those who help themselves to people, and those who help people!"
Reply
#7
[quote='painkiller' pid='33994' dateline='1444012109']
Rockshox and others make what they call a "dropper" seatpost. they are quite expensive but will do what you are asking.
http://www.competitivecyclist.com/thomson-dropper-seatpost?CMP_SKU=THP0020&MER=0406&skid=THP0020-BK-S272XS430&CMP_ID=PLA_GOc014&mv_pc=r101&utm_source=Google&utm_medium=PLA&CSPID=0914&mr:trackingCode=0FE7856E-0BF4-E411-AAA2-001B21BCB944&mr:referralID=NA&mr:device=c&mr:adType=plaonline&mr:ad=81822233821&mr:keyword&mr:match&mr:tid=kwd-112886522461&mr:ploc=9022118&mr:iloc&mr:store&mr:filter=112886522461&gclid=CIOEutqjqsgCFQ6DaQod3nsAOg&gclsrc=aw.ds
this is an expensive one because after all it is a Thompson. Google dropper seat post and you will find cheaper ones out there, but probably still starting around $140. you can also find them used but still high $$$


try this, sorry
http://www.jensonusa.com/Thomson-Elite-Dropper-Seatpost
[/

I googled alot and couldn't find a realistic option but I didn't use the word "dropper", but a dropper seat post might be too expensive. I want to ride daily, rain or shine, even if it is 120 degrees. Swimming and bicycling are the best exercise for me, these activities work better than pain pills. After having handicap plates for many years, I thought I'd never be on a bicycle again. Many years ago, At 300 lbs with mobility issues, I needed alot of convincing to buy a Walmart bike and I even crashed with it shortly after the purchase, bent the steel frame, and stopped riding out of fear and to heal. I eventually replaced that bike with a name brand. I am much better today, weight 60 lbs less and I am strong and active. On a good day, I can hop on and off with no issues, things are more difficult on a bad day. I have been concentrating on owning just one bike. Instead of a dropper, perhaps owning another bicycle for those bad days, a step thru, is wiser. I will research more, Thanks, Duane Smile
Reply
#8
(10-05-2015, 02:43 PM)Old Duane Wrote:  
(10-05-2015, 02:28 AM)painkiller Wrote:  Rockshox and others make what they call a "dropper" seatpost. they are quite expensive but will do what you are asking.
http://www.competitivecyclist.com/thomson-dropper-seatpost?CMP_SKU=THP0020&MER=0406&skid=THP0020-BK-S272XS430&CMP_ID=PLA_GOc014&mv_pc=r101&utm_source=Google&utm_medium=PLA&CSPID=0914&mr:trackingCode=0FE7856E-0BF4-E411-AAA2-001B21BCB944&mr:referralID=NA&mr:device=c&mr:adType=plaonline&mr:ad=81822233821&mr:keyword&mr:match&mr:tid=kwd-112886522461&mr:ploc=9022118&mr:iloc&mr:store&mr:filter=112886522461&gclid=CIOEutqjqsgCFQ6DaQod3nsAOg&gclsrc=aw.ds
this is an expensive one because after all it is a Thompson. Google dropper seat post and you will find cheaper ones out there, but probably still starting around $140. you can also find them used but still high $$$



try this, sorry
http://www.jensonusa.com/Thomson-Elite-Dropper-Seatpost
[/

I googled alot and couldn't find a realistic option but I didn't use the word "dropper", but a dropper seat post might be too expensive. I want to ride daily, rain or shine, even if it is 120 degrees. Swimming and bicycling are the best exercise for me, these activities work better than pain pills. After having handicap plates for many years, I thought I'd never be on a bicycle again. Many years ago, At 300 lbs with mobility issues, I needed alot of convincing to buy a Walmart bike and I even crashed with it shortly after the purchase, bent the steel frame, and stopped riding out of fear and to heal. I eventually replaced that bike with a name brand. I am much better today, weight 60 lbs less and I am strong and active. On a good day, I can hop on and off with no issues, things are more difficult on a bad day.  I have been concentrating on owning just one bike. Instead of a dropper, perhaps owning another bicycle for those bad days, a step thru, is wiser. I will research more, Thanks, Duane Smile
Have you ever though of getting a 3 wheel bike? Some of them are pretty nice. It may solve all your problems.
"Where ever we go, there we are"
Reply
#9
(10-05-2015, 03:52 PM)elmore leonard Wrote:  
(10-05-2015, 02:43 PM)Old Duane Wrote:  
(10-05-2015, 02:28 AM)painkiller Wrote:  Rockshox and others make what they call a "dropper" seatpost. they are quite expensive but will do what you are asking.
http://www.competitivecyclist.com/thomson-dropper-seatpost?CMP_SKU=THP0020&MER=0406&skid=THP0020-BK-S272XS430&CMP_ID=PLA_GOc014&mv_pc=r101&utm_source=Google&utm_medium=PLA&CSPID=0914&mr:trackingCode=0FE7856E-0BF4-E411-AAA2-001B21BCB944&mr:referralID=NA&mr:device=c&mr:adType=plaonline&mr:ad=81822233821&mr:keyword&mr:match&mr:tid=kwd-112886522461&mr:ploc=9022118&mr:iloc&mr:store&mr:filter=112886522461&gclid=CIOEutqjqsgCFQ6DaQod3nsAOg&gclsrc=aw.ds
this is an expensive one because after all it is a Thompson. Google dropper seat post and you will find cheaper ones out there, but probably still starting around $140. you can also find them used but still high $$$




try this, sorry
http://www.jensonusa.com/Thomson-Elite-Dropper-Seatpost
[/

I googled alot and couldn't find a realistic option but I didn't use the word "dropper", but a dropper seat post might be too expensive. I want to ride daily, rain or shine, even if it is 120 degrees. Swimming and bicycling are the best exercise for me, these activities work better than pain pills. After having handicap plates for many years, I thought I'd never be on a bicycle again. Many years ago, At 300 lbs with mobility issues, I needed alot of convincing to buy a Walmart bike and I even crashed with it shortly after the purchase, bent the steel frame, and stopped riding out of fear and to heal. I eventually replaced that bike with a name brand. I am much better today, weight 60 lbs less and I am strong and active. On a good day, I can hop on and off with no issues, things are more difficult on a bad day.  I have been concentrating on owning just one bike. Instead of a dropper, perhaps owning another bicycle for those bad days, a step thru, is wiser. I will research more, Thanks, Duane Smile
Have you ever though of getting a 3 wheel bike? Some of them are pretty nice. It may solve all your problems.

Yes I have considered it, but I want to challenge myself, not resign myself too early. I became in bad shape by following the bad advice of one Dr. Another Dr. cited the need to challenge my capabilities. I have gone from handicap plates, walking with a cane with lots of pain and balance issues, with many sick hours.....to walking 13 miles without a cane, climbing mountain trails, balancing on a bicycle again and riding 26 miles. Now I can also lift heavy things(up to 100 lbs) and work all day in the hot desert sun. I'm saving the three wheeled bike option for my 80th birthday, one with lots of gears that goes fast as well as climbs hills. I have been on this transformation for 7 years already, I have come a long way and need to go a long way yet. I want to ride a 80 mile bike ride. I want to be able to own and ride a road bike again(but no spandex please). Keep looking in your rear mirror, one day crazy me will be there.

The dropper seat post is ridiculous for me. I have already acquired access to a single speed step thru beach cruiser bicycle for my bad days.
Reply
#10
Here's a couple DIY suggestions:
- Find a coil spring that will fit around the seatpost and that is roughly the right length to bring the seat up to your "riding height". With a quick release skewer on the seat post, you can flip it open and let the spring pop the seat up for you.

- Use a piece of wire or cable as a lease cut to the length of the seat post again when it would be at "riding height" and attach it to the seat and frame. When you're on the bike, you can flip open the QR seat skewer and manually pull the seat up. It won't pop it up for you, but the leash will make the height adjustment quick and easy.

Neither of these would be as nice as a fancy post, but if you're looking for a quick, cheap improvement.
Reply
#11
(10-06-2015, 04:24 PM)DaveM Wrote:  Here's a couple DIY suggestions:
- Find a coil spring that will fit around the seatpost and that is roughly the right length to bring the seat up to your "riding height". With a quick release skewer on the seat post, you can flip it open and let the spring pop the seat up for you.

- Use a piece of wire or cable as a lease cut to the length of the seat post again when it would be at "riding height" and attach it to the seat and frame. When you're on the bike, you can flip open the QR seat skewer and manually pull the seat up. It won't pop it up for you, but the leash will make the height adjustment quick and easy.

Neither of these would be as nice as a fancy post, but if you're looking for a quick, cheap improvement.

VERY clever idea.....Thanks. Smile
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Cutting carbon seat post ajstevo 2 3,877 02-25-2016, 03:09 AM
Last Post: ajstevo
  Seat post clamp pops off the frame thebluepixie 4 5,624 01-13-2013, 11:16 PM
Last Post: painkiller
  The screw of my Seat Post Clamp has worn and I need to get it Off. Parkinson021 14 13,885 11-03-2012, 04:32 AM
Last Post: nfmisso
  Suspension type Seat post? Bill 5 13,953 05-06-2011, 07:34 PM
Last Post: JohnV
  Seat post stuck ecoull 5 17,263 04-02-2011, 01:41 AM
Last Post: RobAR
  Quintana roo system 6 seat post question tglas1 1 6,981 09-30-2010, 04:32 AM
Last Post: nfmisso
  Simple Seat Post/Tube question from a MTB newbie NewbieAM 6 16,831 09-23-2010, 07:56 PM
Last Post: jinxy72
  Seat post stuck in seat tube danr2013 1 8,376 08-30-2010, 01:48 AM
Last Post: Bill
  Seat Post Lubrication TopTube 4 10,745 05-06-2010, 03:32 PM
Last Post: TopTube
  Stuck saddle post colinJG 8 13,130 03-07-2010, 06:46 PM
Last Post: marathon marke

Forum Jump:



ISSN 1918-3445 © Copyright 2007-2010 Bicycle Tutor / Privacy Policy / Created by Alex Ramon

feed